Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry W. Halleck or search for Henry W. Halleck in all documents.

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tle of Farmington, Miss. General Pope's report. near Farmington, May 9--P. M. To Major-General Halleck: the enemy, twenty thousand strong, drove in our pickets beyond Farmington, and advansouthward, ready to aid the pickets, gave them a warm reception, but owing to a despatch from Gen. Halleck, requesting that no general engagement should be brought on, Gen. Paine was ordered to fall bh, hold Farmington if it could be done easily, and should that prove difficult, fall back. General Halleck had given orders to do so, and avoid bringing on any general engagement. Nearer and neareras there were plenty of troops near, the place could have been held had such been the wish of Gen. Halleck. All the rebels obtained was the benefit of any knowledge their reconnoissance afforded themeached the rebel position and attacked it. The reasons of the present delay are known only to Gen. Halleck. Doubtless they are good and sufficient. Every thing here would seem to be in readiness — t
Doc. 41.-battle at Russell's House, near Corinth, Mississippi, May 17. Report of Gen. W. T. Sherman. headquarters Fifth division army of the Tennessee, camp before Corinth, May 19, 1862. Capt. Geo. E. Flynt, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Gen. Thomas's Staff: sir : I have the honor to report that, in compliance with the purpose of Major-Gen. Halleck, as explained at the interview of the eleventh instant, Gen. Thomas being present, I made all possible inquiry as to the topography of the ground in my front, with its water-courses, fields, and roads, and on the seventeenth made dispositions to drive the enemy from his position at Russell's house. I requested Gen. Hurlbut to put in motion two regiments and a battery of artillery, at three o'clock P. M., on the road which passes the front of his line and runs to Russell's house. I ordered Gen. Denver to take a right-hand road with two regiments of his brigade and one battery of light artillery, namely, the Seventieth
eral days. Col. Elliott's command subsisted upon meat alone, such as they could find in the country. For daring and despatch, this expedition has been successful in the highest degree, and entitles Col. Elliott and his command to high distinction. Its results will be embarrassing to the enemy and contribute greatly to their loss and demoralization. He reports the road full of small parties of the retreating enemy, scattering in all directions. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. A National account. on the Tuscumbia, Miss., June 1, 1862. Col. Elliott, with his cavalry, has returned, and given us such news as to justify a large portion of this army to advance with hot haste on the fleeing rebels. The battery over the swamp of Tuscumbia has been evacuated during the night. Our men sawed down trees above the road, out of range of the battery, and would have captured the whole crew at daylight. Perhaps they will get them betw
tary of War: General Pope's heavy batteries opened upon the enemy's intrenchments yesterday about ten o'clock A. M., and soon drove the rebels from their advanced batteries. Major-Gen. W. S. Sherman established another heavy battery yesterday afternoon within one thousand yards of their works, and skirmishing parties advanced at day-break this morning. Three of our divisions are already in the enemy's advance works, about three fourths of a mile from Corinth, which is in flames. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. General Sherman's report. headquarters First division, army of the Tennessee, camp near Corinth, Miss., May 30, 1862. Captain George E. Flynt, Assist. Adjt.-Gen. to Major-Gen. Thomas: sir: On the nineteenth instant, I reported the operations of this division in taking from the enemy the position at Russell's. After driving the enemy away, we found it one of great natural strength, and proceeded to fortify it. Lines were laid off by the engineers, Captain Kossa
nd of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themselves the best way they could. We have captured nine locomotives and a number of cars. One of the former is already repaired, and is running to-day. Several more will be in running order in two or three days. The result is all I could possibly desire. H. W. Halleck, Major-General Commanding. Gen. Pope did not push hard upon me with forty thousand men, thirty miles from Corinth on the fourth instant; for my troops occupied a defensive line in the rear of Twenty-Mile Creek less than twenty-five miles from Corinth until the eighth instant, when the want of good water induced me to retire at my leisure to a better position; moreover, if Gen. Pope had attempted at any time during the retreat from Corinth, to push hard upon me, I would have given him
Doc. 81-army of the Tennessee. Report of General J. A. McClernand of the operations of the reserve corps from the battle of Shiloh to the evacuation of Corinth. headquarters reserve corps, army of the Tennessee, camp Jackson, July 4, 1862. Major-General H. W. Halleck, Commanding Department of the Mississippi: my report of the part taken by my command, consisting of the First division of the Army of the Tennessee, in the battle of Shiloh, explains how the enemy was driven from my camp on the seventh and forced with great loss to abandon the ground he had gained on the sixth of April. I will not dwell upon the incidents of that great event now, it would be supererogatory to do so. They have passed into glorious and imperishable history, and there let them rest. Devoting my attention during the interval to measures necessary to repair the consequences of a protracted and sanguinary battle, and to restore the vigor and efficiency of my command; and having prepared the wa
, Cedar Mountain, August 13-5 P. M. To Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: on Thursday morginia. In accordance with those views, Major-Gen. Halleck was called to Washington and placed in ge works at Manassas Junction, and requested Gen. Halleck to push Franklin with all speed to Gainesvie forces will be in to-morrow. (Signed) H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: T. C. H. S. Don't yield an inch if you can help it. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: T. C. H. Se news more often if possible. (Signed) H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: Myer Asch,arrival of cavalry to-day. Yours truly, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. P. S.--Acknowledgnd Middletown, Sunday, Sept. 14-9.40 P. M. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: after a very severe Potomac, Sept. 15, 1862-8 o'clock A. M. Henry W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: I have just learneunmindful of the honors due to the living. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Wilcox's or[10 more...]
Doc. 93.-battle of Cedar Mountain, Va. this battle is also known as the battle of slaughter's Mountain, Cedar Creek, and South-west Mountain. General Pope's report. headquarters army of Virginia, Cedar Mountain, August 13-5 P. M. To Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: on Thursday morning the enemy crossed the Rapidan at Barnet's Ford in heavy force, and advanced strong on the road to Culpeper and Madison Court-House. I had established my whole force on the turnpike between Culpeper and Sperryville, ready to concentrate at either place as soon as the enemy's plans were developed. Early on Friday it became apparent that the move on Madison Court-House was merely a feint, to deceive the army corps of Gen. Sigel, at Sperryville, and that the main attack of the enemy would be at Culpeper, to which place I had thrown forward part of Banks's and McDowell's corps. Brig.-Gen. Bayard, with part of the rear of McDowell's corps, who was in the advance near the Rapidan
rginia. In accordance with those views, Major-Gen. Halleck was called to Washington and placed in gresident, to the Secretary of War, and to General Halleck, my desire to be relieved from the commanpahannock. Meantime, before the arrival of Gen. Halleck, I instructed Gen. King, at Fredericksburghe works at Manassas Junction, and requested Gen. Halleck to push Franklin with all speed to Gainesvilp you. Fight hard and aid will soon come. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: T. C. H. Se forces will be in to-morrow. (Signed) H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: T. C. H. S. Don't yield an inch if you can help it. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: T. C. H. Sead of taking them to Bealton. (Signed) H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief United States militarye news more often if possible. (Signed) H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. A true copy: Myer Asch,arrival of cavalry to-day. Yours truly, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. P. S.--Acknowledg[1 more...]
l McClellan. headquarters of the army of the Potomac, three miles beyond Middletown, Sunday, Sept. 14-9.40 P. M. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: after a very severe engagement, the corps of General Hooker and General Reno have carried the hkilled. George B. Mcclellan, Major-General. headquarters army of the Potomac, Sept. 15, 1862-3 o'clock A. M. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: I am happy to inform you that General Franklin's success on the left was as complete as ge B. McClellan, Major-General Commanding headquarters of the army of the Potomac, Sept. 15, 1862-8 o'clock A. M. Henry W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: I have just learned from General Hooker, in the advance, who states that the information is p their retreat to the utmost. George B. McClellan. headquarters army of the Potomac, Bolivar, Sept. 15-10 A. M. To H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: Information this moment received, completely confirms the rout and demoralization of the rebel
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