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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
seen! . . . [A few words will recall the position of the Army of the Potomac at that time. Halleck was virtually in command of the Union armies. In June, Lee turned the right wing of the Union satisfaction at the Capitol. At Centreville, writes Lyman, we had a set — to between Meade and Halleck. Meade had asked, by telegraph, for some advice, and stated that he was not sufficiently assured of the enemy's position to risk an advance; so conflicting were the reports. Halleck, apparently after dinner, replied in substance, Lee is plainly bullying you. If you can't find him, I can't. Iketry fire, than hold my place! Lee, finding that he could not outflank Meade, fell back, and Halleck apologized.] Headquarters Army Op Potomac October 23, 1863 And where do you think I was allawaiting us; the guard-post near by turned out in our honor, and we drove in great state to General Halleck's office; where General Meade went in and held a solemn pow-wow; the two came forth present
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
its of shell that the farmers will sometimes pick up. But Master, who lived in the big house, is shot, long ago — he and his regime both. February 5, 1864 General Humphreys sent for me and showed me a cipher correspondence between Butler and Halleck, and Halleck and Sedgwick. B. telegraphed that large reinforcements had been sent from the Rapid Ann to North Carolina, and that he wished a demonstration to draw their forces from Richmond. S. replied that, with the exception of some two or tHalleck and Sedgwick. B. telegraphed that large reinforcements had been sent from the Rapid Ann to North Carolina, and that he wished a demonstration to draw their forces from Richmond. S. replied that, with the exception of some two or three brigades, nobody had been sent to that place from the army in our front. B. then said he was going to move on Richmond, or something of the sort, and would like a demonstration not later than Saturday (to-morrow). S. said it was too short a time to make any great show and that it would spoil our chances for a surprise on their works, in future. H. then telegraphed to do, at any rate, what we could. So Kilpatrick has been sent to their right via Mine Ford, and Merritt is to threaten Barn
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
Speaking of Butler's visit, he had sent him an aide without consulting him, and Benjamin thought it a good chance to hit Halleck over the aide's head. Aide-de-camp, sir! Ordered on my Staff, sir! I'm sure I do not know what you are to do. I have really nothing for you. All the positions are filled. Now there is General Halleck, what has he to do? At a moment when every true man is laboring to his utmost, when the days ought to be forty hours long, General Halleck is translating French bookGeneral Halleck is translating French books at nine cents a page; and, sir, if you should put those nine cents in a box and shake them up, you would form a clear idea of General Halleck's soul! July 22, 1864 I had one of the most amusing excursions that I have had during the campaign General Halleck's soul! July 22, 1864 I had one of the most amusing excursions that I have had during the campaign — really quite a picnic. Colonel de Chanal, Rosy, and myself made the party. The distance to Butler's Headquarters, whither we were bound, is about eight miles, and the road all the way was either through the woods or shaded by trees, and the dust
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
that. All these moves being a part of what we may call a throttling plan. Their struggles, though often apparently successful, do them thus far no good. They flank us on the Weldon railroad and brush off 2000 prisoners: no use! we hold the road. They flank us again at the Pegram house, and capture 1000 more: no use; we hold the Pegram position and add it to former acquisitions. Then they flank Butler and get eight of his guns; but they have to go back, and Benjamin remains in what General Halleck terms a threatening attitude. . . . Yesterday, Loring, whom I saw over at General Parke's Headquarters, was speaking of the quaint ways of talking among soldiers. Their lines are at peace out there, and the soldiers don't fire; notwithstanding, some sharpshooters, with telescopic rifles, are posted here and there. As he rode along, he met two of these gentry coming with faces as of men who had labored in a good cause, without profit. Hullo! said L., did you get good places out in fr
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
hen not to fight). It was in just such a move that Pope was smashed all to pieces and driven into Washington. Then Meade forced the Rappahannock, and drove Lee in haste over the Rapid Ann. The Mine Run expedition followed; we did not go fast enough — that was unfortunate; but it would have been more unfortunate to have left 10,000 men on the slopes there. If Meade had lacked the great moral courage to say retreat, after having been called timid by the papers, and having been hounded on by Halleck and Stanton to do something, he would not only have got a disastrous defeat, but would have destroyed the plan of re-enlistments by which we obtained the very backbone of our army for this campaign. His timidity lies in this, that he will not try to build a house without enough of tools and timber. Lately, they have turned round, 180 degrees, and now call him butcher ; but that does just as well — blow hot, blow cold. This is a fair statement. I don't say he is Napoleon, Caesar and Alex
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
, 316, 329; anger of, 90, 168n. Guerillas, repressing, 5; operations, 39. Guinea Bridge, 119. Gurley house, 234. Guzman, captain, 178, 179, 183, 190, 214. Hagood, Johnson, 222. Hail Columbia and North Carolina regiment, 182. Halleck, Henry Wager, 37, 68; difference with Meade, 35; Butler on, 193. Halsted, George Blight, 317. Hamlin, Hannibal, 76. Hampton, Wade, 252. Hamyl, —, 151. Hancock, Winfield Scott, 88, 90, 93, 96n, 107, 119, 121, 122, 129, 145, 148, 150; qualities to, 359. Meade, George Gordon, 97, 107, 122, 338; at Key West, III; accepts Lyman as volunteer aide, 3; manner of riding, 8; at Gettysburg, 12; characteristics, 25, 38, 57, 61, 73, 123, 128, 134, 138, 148, 167, 176, 188, 225, 358; difference with Halleck, 35; visits Washington, 36, 48; well laid plans, 46; succession to, 60; illness, 64, 345, 355; in danger, 105, 232, 238, 332; Sheridan and, 105, 271, 348; Sherman's despatch, 126; before Petersburg, 165, 214, 242; Burnside and, 200; rumored remo