Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Ham or search for Ham in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
a precious book—the rule of conduct. I have always supposed that its spirit was directly opposed to everything in the shape of fraud and oppression. However, sir, I should be glad to hear your text. He somewhat hesitatingly muttered out— Ham—Noah's curse, you know. O, sir, you build on a very slender foundation. Granting, even—what remains to be proved—that the Africans are the descendants of Ham, Noah's curse was a prediction of future servitude, and not an injunction to oppressHam, Noah's curse was a prediction of future servitude, and not an injunction to oppress. Pray, sir, is it a careful desire to fulfil the Scriptures, or to make money, that induces you to hold your fellow-men in bondage? Why, sir, exclaimed the slavite, with unmingled astonishment, do you really think that the slaves are beings like ourselves?—that is, I mean do you believe that they possess the same faculties and capacities as the whites? Certainly, sir, I responded; I do not know that there is any moral or intellectual quality in the curl of the hair or the color
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
—some profound thinker—who wished justice to be done though the heavens should fall, but he was despondent. It seemed as though nearly the whole business of the press, the pulpit, and the theological seminary, was to reconcile the people to the permanent degradation and slavery of the negro race. The church had its negro pew, and caste was as strictly enforced between the African and European complexions as it ever was between Pariah and Brahmin. Biblical scholars justified the slavery of Ham's descendants from the Bible. And, what was worst of all, the humanity and philanthropy which could not otherwise be disposed of, was ingeniously seduced into an African Colonization Society, whereby all slaves who had grown seditious and troublesome to their masters could be transplanted on the pestiferous African Coast. That this wretched and seemingly transparent humbug could have deluded anybody, must now seem past belief: but I must with shame confess the fact that I for one was delude