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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 9 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 5 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
slowly, were kept under a galling fire. The men were struck down by an invisible foe, who lurked in the bushes or fired from over the edge of the bluffs without any danger of being struck from the vessels. Flusser had been ordered to go to Hamilton, and he was determined to get there, no matter what might be the consequence. This gallant officer was now placed in a most trying position. but he stood unflinchingly at his post and continued on his way. The only thing to be done was to keepn under cover as much as possible and return the enemy's fire when opportunity offered. In spite of all precautions, however, the fleet had one man killed and ten wounded. The Confederates deserted their forts as the steamers approached, and Hamilton was reached. Having taken possession of the Confederate steamer Nelson at this place, the expedition returned in safety to the Sound. In the latter part of October, 1862, another expedition, a combined military and naval force, was started f
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
herein the Taylor participated so largely, has already been reported to the Department. There is no doubt left in the minds of any, but that the Taylor saved Helena, for, though General Prentiss fought with a skill and daring not excelled in this war, his little force of thirty-five hundred men were fast being overpowered by the enemy with eighteen thousand men, when the Taylor took a position and changed the fortunes of the day. I must not omit to mention Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenants Hamilton and Richardson of the powder vessels Great Western and Judge Torrence. They were unremitting in their attention to their duties during the siege, supplying without de lay every requisition made on them by the Army and Navy, and volunteering for any service. When the Army called on the Navy for siege guns, I detailed what officers and men I could spare to man and work the batteries. Lieutenant Commander Selfridge had command of the naval battery on the right wing in General Sherman's
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
; Acting-Ensigns, C. F. Keith and J. T. Chadwell; Acting-Master's Mates, W. W. Reed, George Couch and Wm. B. Dyer, Jr.; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, E. A. Whipple; Acting-Second-Assistant, John Carren; Acting-Third-Assistants, Andrew McTurk, Wm. Moran and W. R. Nutz; Acting-Gunner, J. H. Pennington. Iron-clad steamer Patapsco. Commander, Daniel Ammen; Lieutenant, Henry Erben, Jr.; Assistant Surgeon, W. L. Wheeler; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Daniel Leach, Jr.; Acting-Master, William Hamilton; Acting-Ensigns, J. T. Ross and Henry Kloeppel; Engineers: First-Assistant, B. B. H. Wharton; Second-Assistant, John B. Carpenter; Third-Assistants, J. W. Huxley and G. C. Cook. Steam-Sloop Pawnee. Commander, G. B. Balch; Lieutenant, F. M. Bunce; Surgeon, W. T. Hord; Assistant-Paymaster, F. R. Curtis; Acting-Masters, J. C. Champion and J. P. Lindsay; Acting-Ensign, Thomas Moore; Acting-Master's Mates, C. J. Rogers, J. G. Bache and A. A. Franzen; Engineers: Second--Assistant, Alfre
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
There was great danger in some of the expeditions, and good judgment and gallantry shown in all. Lieutenant C. W. Flusser, who has already figured as a brave and energetic officer, was a leading spirit in every enterprise set on foot. He seemed to delight in making explorations where little was to be gained except hard knocks, and it is remarkable that in the severe river-fighting to which he was exposed he did not sooner lose his life. On the 9th of July, 1862, he left Plymouth for Hamilton in the steamer Commodore Perry, having taken on board Captain W. W. Hammell, Company F., 9th New York Volunteers, and twenty of his men, with the steamers Shawsheen and Ceres in company; the latter vessel having on board Second-Lieutenant Joseph A. Green and ten men. While ascending the river, at 1 o'clock P. M., the flotilla was fired upon from the south bank by riflemen. Flusser returned the fire and pushed on, expecting to meet the enemy at Hamilton in force. The vessels were under
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
conducted themselves. I have already mentioned Lieutenant-Commander Perkins, of the Chickasaw, and Lieutenant Yates, of the Augusta, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant William Hamilton, late commanding officer of the Augusta Dinsmore, had been invalided by medical survey, but he eagerly offered his services on board the iron-clad Chickhe officers and men for their coolness and efficiency under fire, and their endurance while at quarters. I would mention in particular Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant William Hamilton, the executive officer, who, when on his way home, condemned by medical survey, volunteered for this vessel. I owe much to him, his energy, in fitting Engineer, John Purdy; Pilot, Wm. H. Wroten; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman. [Note.--A more complete list cannot be obtained.] Chickasaw. Lieutenant-Commander, Geo. H. Perkins; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, William Hamilton; Acting Master, E. D. Percy; Gunner, J. A. McDonald. [Note.--A more complete list cannot be obtained.]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
nsigns, James Whitworth, Michael Murphy and John Morrisey, Jr.; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. Edgar, H. C. Atter and J. L. Hall; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Simon Schultice; Acting-First-Assistant, James Munroe; Second-Assistant, John Wilson; Acting-Second-Assistant, Philip Allman; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. M. Quin, R. D. Wright, T. J. Myers, James Morris, S. W. Dalton, Jr., and John Donaldson. Chickasaw--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, George H. Perkins; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, Wm. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. K. Bacon; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. S. Wheeler; Acting-Master and Pilot, Benj. Lancashier; Acting-Ensign, G. L. Jordan; Acting-Master's Mates, F. A. Case, M. F. Keeshan, Chas. Atkins, W. A. Osborn and M. J. Jones; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Wm. Rodgers; Acting-First-Assistant, E. P. Bartlett; Acting-Second-Assistant, J. M. Maratta; Acting-Third-Assistants, Alfred Wilkinson, A. H. Goff, George Harris, Henry Duckworth and Alexander Wiggins; Gunner, J. A. McD
mned by medical survey. The reports of the different commanders will show how they conducted themselves. I have already mentioned Lieutenant Commander Perkins of the Chickasaw, and Lieutenant Yates of the Augusta. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William Hamilton, late commanding officer of the Augusta Dinsmore, had been invalided by medical survey, but he eagerly offered his services on board the iron-clad Chickasaw, having had much experience in our Monitors. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant P. G I advanced and shelled Fort Gaines. Too much praise cannot be given to all the officers and men for their coolness and efficiency under fire, and their endurance while at quarters. I would mention in particular, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William Hamilton, the executive officer, who, when on his way home, condemned by medical survey, volunteered for this vessel. I owe much to him for his energy in fitting out the vessel, and for his gallantry and coolness during the fight. Acting Mast
nry, the cavalry and Elder's battery, and Captain Hamilton the artillery. As soon as possible, Metcn attempt to enfilade the enemy on his right, Hamilton moved forward four pieces; but before he got e up to his support. In twenty minutes time, Hamilton lost forty-four men, killed and wounded, and ably lose the day for us. The behavior of Captain Hamilton at this critical period of the battle is f to be an officer of no ordinary merit. Captain Hamilton kept his pieces at work until it was evidnto possession of the enemy. On the right of Hamilton, the Seventh Connecticut and the Seventh New-to us, and, of course, whipped us badly. Captain Hamilton is wounded in his left arm severely, and Stevens; and the artillery, consisting of Captain Hamilton's, Captain Langdon's, and Captain Elder'sies a better and more elevated position. Captain Hamilton, with battery M, Third United States artiso wounded in a short time. At this time Captain Hamilton's battery became endangered, and he cried[5 more...]
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 8: the siege of Yorktown. (search)
rried his piece of shelter tent. Six wagons only were allowed each regiment for officers' tents, baggage and the hospital and commissary stores. As the column took up its line of march, the cavalry and sharpshooters were sent in advance, to reconnoitre and to remove any obstructions of felled trees or broken bridges by which the enemy might have endeavored to retard their progress. The main body of the troops advanced by the direct route to Yorktown. General Morrill's Brigade and General Hamilton's Division of the Third Corps took a road which led to the right. The route traversed by both wings of the army led through the old fortifications of Big Bethel and over a fertile and very beautiful region, shaded with forests and embellished with the mansions of the wealthy planters. It was formerly the garden spot of Virginia, but the war had already spread its desolation over the once fair fields and they were now perfectly devastated. The farms were forsaken, and the little villa
Connor. Charles Cook. James Cooper. David G. Copp. Philip Carey. Duncan Crawford. Andrew Cronan. Francis W. Devine. William Dow. Stephen Doer. Edward Dillon. John F. Jordan. Co. C.Edward C. Doherty. Thomas A. Dow. Reuben B. Dow. James Eckelman. James Eldridge. John Fisher. John Farren. Winslow P. Eayers. Robert H. Eastman. Joseph Frey. George Riese. John Davis. William Barnes. Co. D.James Dunn. John W. Gallagher. Henry G. Fuller. Michael Hogan. Philip Hunt. William Hamilton. Charles Harris. Fred W. Hubner. Andrew P. Green. Michael Gahagin. Co. D.Frank Heill. Charles Ferguson. William Smith. Co. E.William Johnson, Corporal. Julius Rieser. James M. Harrison. Henry Hagedon. Michael Holligan. Alfred Horstman. Peter Kennedy. William B. Kelley. Rodney King. Michael Kenney. George Jones. Robert Slocum. Henry Urban. Co. F.Charles Lynch, Corporal. George Doherty. Jeremiah Lucius. John Larouche. James Lynch. Frank Lopez. William Marsha
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