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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 207 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 90 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 32 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 28 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Alexander Hamilton or search for Alexander Hamilton in all documents.

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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Southern Notions of the North. (search)
to tempt men from the comforts of home to the discomforts of the field. Nine-tenths of the wealth of the South is in fancy human stock; of no particular value to the soldier of fortune — of no value at all to the patriotic Northern volunteer. Mercenary, indeed! These noble soldiers who have just left home and comfort and their loved ones to fight the battle of the Constitution, asking no recompense but the consciousness of rectitude — mercenaries! If so, then Warren and Washington, then Hamilton and Schuyler were mercenaries! If so, who would not be a mercenary? The men of the North know indeed the value of money. They know what it will do; and they know, as Southern rebels will find out to their cost, just the right time to spend it. History hardly records such a profuse, yet enlightened liberality as that which the Northern States have exhibited. It is hardly an exaggeration to say, that the entire wealth of cities and towns, of private corporation and of individuals has be
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Constitution — not Conquest. (search)
lode this feeble hypothesis. The question was argued, and it was settled before the present Southern belligerent expounders were begotten. The men who established the Union may be reasonably supposed to have understood what they were about — to have known what they desired to effect and to have been capable of effecting it. The identical question of the right of a State to withdraw from the compact, was debated and decided at the very time when the compact was adopted. We quote only Alexander Hamilton, who said: A law, by the very meaning of the term, includes supremacy. It is a rule which those to whom it is prescribed are bound to preserve. This results from every political association. If individuals enter into a state of society, the laws of that society must be the supreme regulator of their conduct. If a number of political societies enter into a larger political society, the laws which the latter may enact, pursuant to the powers intrusted to it by the Constitution, must
riginal of the Confederacy175 De Bow on Confederate Manufactures230 Debt, The Confederate285 Everett, Edward45, 181 Fielder, Herbert, his Pamphlet46 Fillmore, Millard116 Floyd, John B162 Fortescue on Slavery303 Free States, Southern Opinion of316 Freedmen, Probable Vices of362 Franklin on British Policy366 Fast Day, Mr. Davis's377 Gregory, M. P.163 Greenville, Lord, on Emancipation329 Goethe on the Future of America808 Greatness, Historical856 Hamilton, Alexander, on the Union297 Hawks, Dr., his Twelve Questions305 Independence, Declaration of139 Independence, Southern Association for265 Ireland, The Case of294 Johnson, Reverdy42 Johnson, Dr., his Favorite Toast329 Lord, President3, 319 Lawrence, Abbot25 Ludovico, Father54 Lincoln, Abraham181, 384 Letcher, Governor340 Mason, John Y13, 24 Mitchel, John20, 50 Matthews, of Virginia, on Education92 Montgomery, The Muddle at181 Morse, Samuel and