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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 207 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 90 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 32 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 28 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters. You can also browse the collection for Alexander Hamilton or search for Alexander Hamilton in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

ss of the American and the temporary nature of many of his arrangements are largely due to the experimental character of the exploration and development of this continent. The new energies released by the settlement of the colonies were indeed guided by stern determination, wise forethought, and inventive skill; but no one has ever really known the outcome of the experiment. It is a story of faith, of Effort, and expectation, and desire, And something evermore about to be. An Alexander Hamilton may urge with passionate force the adoption of the Constitution, without any firm conviction as to its permanence. The most clear-sighted American of the Civil War period recognized this element of uncertainty in our American adventure when he declared: We are now testing whether this nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. More than fifty years have passed since that war reaffirmed the binding force of the Constitution and apparently sealed the perpetui
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 3: the third and fourth generation (search)
eton, Edwards is called to the vacant Presidency. He is reluctant to go, for though he is only fifty-four, his health has never been robust, and he has his great book on the History of redemption still to write. But he accepts, finds the smallpox raging in Princeton upon his arrival in January, 1758, is inoculated, and dies of the disease in March--his dreams unfulfilled, his life-work once more thwarted. Close by the tomb of this saint is the tomb of his grandson, Aaron Burr, who killed Hamilton. The literary reputation of Jonathan Edwards has turned, like the vicissitudes of his life, upon factors that could, not be foreseen. His contemporary fame was chiefly as a preacher, and was due to sermons like those upon God glorified in man's Dependence and The reality of spiritual life, rather than to such discourses as the Enfield sermon, Sinners in the hands of an Angry God, which in our own day is the best known of his deliverances. Legends have grown up around this terrific Enfi
f the National Gazette in Philadelphia, he becomes involved in the bitter quarrel between his chief, Jefferson, and Alexander Hamilton. His attachment to the cause of the French Revolution makes him publish baseless attacks upon Washington. By and fervor which transformed them and made his pages gay and bold and clear as a trumpet. Clear and bold and gay was Alexander Hamilton likewise; and his literary services to the Revolution are less likely to be underestimated than Thomas Paine's. TheHamilton's military career, upon the defects of the Articles of Confederation and of the finances of the Confederation. Hamilton contributed but little to the actual structure of the new Constitution, but as a debater he fought magnificently and trie signature Publius in two New York newspapers between October, 1787, and April, 1788, owed their conception largely to Hamilton, who wrote more than half of them himself. In manner they are not unlike the substantial Whig literature of England, an
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 7: romance, poetry, and history (search)
cendant of John Cotton, and a clergyman's son, who detested Puritanism and the clergy; who, coming to manhood in the eighteen-forties, hated the very words Transcendentalism, Philosophy, Religion, Reform; an inheritor of property, trained at Harvard, and an Overseer and Fellow of his University, who disliked the ideals of culture and refinement; a member of the Saturday Club who was bored with literary talk and literary people; a staunch American who despised democracy as thoroughly as Alexander Hamilton, and thought suffrage a failure; a nineteenth century historian who cared nothing for philosophy, science, or the larger lessons of history itself; a fascinating realistic writer who admired Scott, Byron, and Cooper for their tales of action, and despised Wordsworth and Thoreau as effeminate sentimentalists who were preoccupied with themselves. In Parkman the wheel has come full circle, and a movement that began with expansion of self ended in hard Spartan repression, even in inhibit
this and in many similar rhapsodies Whitman holds obstinately to what may be termed the three points of his national creed. The first is the newness of America, and its expression is in his well-known chant of Pioneers, O pioneers. Yet this new America is subtly related to the past; and in Whitman's later poems, such as Passage to India, the spiritual kinship of orient and occident is emphasized. The second article of the creed is the unity of America. Here he voices the conceptions of Hamilton, Clay, Webster, and Lincoln. In spite of all diversity in external aspects the republic is one and indivisible. This unity, in Whitman's view, was cemented forever by the issue of the Civil War. Lincoln, the Captain, dies indeed on the deck of the victor ship, but the ship comes into the harbor with object won. Third and finally, Whitman insists upon the solidarity of America with all countries of the globe. Particularly in his yearning and thoughtful old age, the poet perceived that h
; quoted, 230 Excelsior, Longfellow 5-6, 156 Exiles' Departure, Whittier 159 Fablefor critics, Lowell 170 Fall of the House of Usher, the, Poe 193 Farewell address, Washington 66 Farewell sermon, Edwards 51 Farmer refuted, the, Hamilton 76 Faust (translation), Taylor, 255 Federalist, 65, 76, 77 Ferdinand and Isabella, history of the Reign of, Prescott 179 Fiction of the 20th century, 261-262 Fire of Driftwood, the, Longfellow 156 First Snowfall, the, Lowell 172 God glorified in man's Dependence, Edwards 50 Gold Bug, the, Poe 193 Gookin, Daniel, 38 Greeley, Horace, 217-18 Greenslet, Ferris, 169 Hale, E. E., 224 Half-century of conflict, a, Parkman 185 Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 107 Hamilton, Alexander, 76-77 Hanging of the Crane, the, Longfellow 156 Harris, J. C., 246 Harte, Bret, 240-42 Harvard, John, 16 Harvard College, 62 Haunted Palace, the, Poe 192 Hawthorne, Nathaniel, in 1826, 89; opinion of Bryant, 105; opinion of