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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 38 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 36 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 13 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Hannibal Hamlin or search for Hannibal Hamlin in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 8 document sections:

in such State or States as may be formed out of said territory north of said Missouri Compromise line, Slavery or involuntary servitude (except for crime) shall be prohibited. The amendment of Mr. Brown was adopted by Yeas 118 to Nays 101--the Yeas consisting of 114 Democrats and 4 Southern Whigs (as yes)--Milton Brown, of Tennessee; James Dellet, of Alabama; Duncan L. Clinch and Alexander Stephens, of Georgia. The Nays were 78 Whigs and 23 Democrats (from Free States), among them, Hannibal Hamlin, John P. Hale, Preston King, George Rathbun, and Jacob Brinckerhoff — since known as Republicans. The joint resolve, as thus amended, passed the House by Yeas 120 to Nays 98--the division being substantially as before. In the Senate, this resolve was taken up for action, February 24th; and, on the 27th, Mr. Foster (Whig), of Tennessee, proposed the following: And provided further, That, in fixing the terms and conditions of such admission, it shall be expressly stipulated and de
hasty consultation, in default of time or opportunity for one more deliberate, among those Democratic members from Free States who felt that the extreme limit of justifiable or tolerable concession to Slavery had already been reached; wherein Messrs. Hamlin, of Maine, George Rathbun, Martin Grover and Preston King, of New York, David Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, Jacob Brinckerhoff and James J. Faran, of Ohio, McClelland, of Michigan, and others, took part; as the result of which, Mr. Wilmot moved tomember present from the Slave States, with Messrs. Cameron, of Pennsylvania; Douglas, of Illinois; Bright, of Indiana; Dickinson, of New York; and Fitzgerald, of Michigan, from Free States--to 21 Nays, including Messrs. Webster, of Massachusetts, Hamlin, of Maine, Dix, of New York, and Breese, of Illinois. The bill, thus amended, passed the Senate by 33 Yeas to 22 Nays. But the House, on its return, thus amended, utterly refused (August 11th) to concur in any such partition of the territorie
priate representatives, may, if they see fit, prohibit the existence of Slavery therein. This touchstone of the true nature and intent of the measure was most decisively voted down; the Yeas and Nays being as follows: Yeas — Fessenden and Hamlin, of Maine; Sumner, of Massachusetts; Foot, of Vermont; Smith, of Connecticut; Fish and Seward, of New York; Chase and Wade, of Ohio; Dodge (Henry), of Wisconsin--10. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodheafixing a day of election, appointing commissioners to lay off Counties, etc., etc., and enabling the people of these Territories to choose their own Governor as well as Legislature,--which was rejected; Yeas 10; Messrs. Chase, Fessenden, Foot, Hamlin, Norris, Seward, Shields, Smith, Sumner, Wade--10. Nays 30. So far, the bill had been acted on as in Committee of the Whole. On coming out of Committee, Mr. Clayton's amendment, above mentioned, was disagreed to--22 to 20--and the bill engros
ated by the constitutional Union party Lincoln and Hamlin by the Republicans the canvass Gov. Seward's clos, Doolittle, Fessenden, lost, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, King, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, and Total 35. The Nays were--Messrs. Fessenden and Hamlin, of Maine, Clark and Hale, of New Hampshire, Sumner, Crittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, Foot, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, PoMessrs. Clark, Clingman, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Hamlin, Latham, Pugh, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, and Wilson, votiwas then adopted ; as follows: Yeas 35; Nays 2--Messrs. Hamlin and Trumbull: the Yeas being as upon the adoption proceeded to ballot for Vice-President, when Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, received, on the first ballot, 194 vcast for other candidates. On the second ballot, Mr. Hamlin received 367 votes to 99 for all others, and was a miracle could prevent the success of Lincoln and Hamlin the next month. Yet the mercantile fears of conv
the good wishes for their success of at least a large proportion of the advocates of Breckinridge and Lane. The toasts drunk with most enthusiasm at the Fourth-of-July celebrations throughout South Carolina pointed to the probable election of Mr. Lincoln as the necessary prelude to movements whereon the hearts of all Carolinians were intent. Southern Fire-Eaters canvassed the Northern States in behalf of Breckinridge and Lane, but very much to the satisfaction of the friends of Lincoln and Hamlin. The Fusion arrangements, whereby it was hoped, at all events, to defeat Lincoln, were not generally favored by the Fire-Eaters who visited the North, whether intent on politics, business, or pleasure; and, in some instances, those who sought to commend themselves to the favor of their Southern patrons or customers, by an exhibition of zeal in the Fusion cause, were quietly told: What you are doing looks not to the end we desire: we want Lincoln elected. In no Slave State did the supporter
ber 9, 1860. in The New York Tribune: going to go.--The people of the United States have indicated, according to the forms prescribed by the Constitution, their desire that Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, shill be their next President, and Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, their Vice-President. A very large plurality of the popular vote has been cast for them, and a decided majority of Electors chosen, who will undoubtedly vote for and elect them on the first Wednesday in December next. The electoand forwarded to Washington, there to be opened and counted, on a given day in February next, in the presence of both Houses of Congress; and it will then be the duty of Mr. John C. Breckinridge, as President of the Senate, to declare Lincoln and Hamlin duly elected President and Vice-President of these United States. Some people do not like this, as is very natural. Dogberry discovered, a good while ago, that When two ride a horse, one must ride behind. That is not generally deemed the pr
the retiring and incoming Presidents, who rode in the same carriage, to the Capitol, was quite respectable — unusually so for that non-enthusiastic, and, as yet, strongly pro-Slavery, metropolis. The Senate had been sitting through most of the preceding forty-eight hours, though this was Monday, and barely concluded the labors of the session in time to allow Vice-President Breckinridge to resign the Chair in a few courteous words, and take his seat on the floor as a member, while Vice-President Hamlin left the floor to take the Chair with as little parade — the two thus exchanging places. This done, and several other new Senators beside Mr. Breckinridge having been sworn in, the space in the Chamber allotted for this occasion to the Embassadors of Foreign Powers ( Dixie not included) was promptly filled by the diplomatic body in full dress; the magnates blazing with stars and orders. Soon, the Justices of the Supreme Court entered in a body, and the assemblage rose in silent hom
of N. H., 171; 175; nominated for President, 223; 224; 402; his report on the destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard, 473-4; 477. Hall, Willard P., of Mo., 225; chosen Lieut. Governor of his State, 576. Halleck, Gen. Henry W., succeeds to the command in Missouri, 594. Hamilton, Alexander, 42; letter from Lafayette to, 51; 82; 107; letter to Madison, 357. Hamilton, Andrew J., of Texas, 339; 350. Hamilton, Gen. James, Jr., of S. C., 169. Hamlet, James, a fugitive slave, 215. Hamlin, Hannibal, 189; nominated for Vice-President, 321. Hammet, Wm. H., of Miss., 161. Hammond, James H., of S. C., 144; 180; 181; 830; 337. Hamner, Rev. James G., on Slavery, 631. Hampton, Va., burnt by Magruder's order, 529. Hampton, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 543. Hardy, Commander Robert, 603. Hardwicke, Lord, on Slavery, 29. Harlan, Mr., of Iowa, 307. Harney, Gen. Wm. S., makes a compact with Gen. Price; is superseded, 491. Harper's Ferry, 414; arsenal fired and