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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xlxv. (search)
over the property by order of the commanding general; and, while civilians like himself were permitted freely to drink at the spring, the suffering soldiers were prohibited from approaching it! Mr. W.‘s indignation was so greatly aroused that, upon reaching Baltimore, on his return home, he, with two other gentlemen, cognizant of the facts, determined to go to Washington and lay the case before the War Department. Upon hearing their statement, the Secretary of War referred them to Surgeon-General Hammond, saying that a requisition from him, to the effect that the grounds of the estate were needed for the wounded, would be instantly responded to by the War Department in the issue of the necessary order, taking possession. They immediately waited upon the Surgeon-General, and procured the document required, upon which Secretary Stanton made out the order, saying, as he signed it: Now, gentlemen, you had better see the President also about this matter, and get his indorsement of the
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
and you've no idea what a power of good it did Sarah Ann? The Rev. Dr. Bellows, of New York, as President of the Sanitary Commission, backed by powerful influences, had pressed with great strenuousness upon the President the appointment of Dr. Hammond as Surgeon-General. For some unexplained reason, there was an unaccountable delay in making the appointment. One stormy evening — the rain falling in torrents--Dr. Bellows, thinking few visitors likely to trouble the President in such a stors, to accomplish the end sought, the President keeping steadily on signing the documents before him. Pausing, at length, to take breath, the clergyman was greeted in the most unconcerned manner, the pen still at work, with,--Shouldn't wonder if Hammond was at this moment Surgeon-General, and had been for some time. You don't mean to say, Mr. President, asked Dr. B. in surprise, that the appointment has been made? I may say to you, returned Mr. Lincoln, for the first time looking up, that
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
40. Garrison, 167. Gilbert, Wall Street Assessor, 255. Goldsborough, Admiral, 240. Grant, General, 56, 57, 265, 283, 292. Greeley, 152. Greene, W. T., 267. Gulliver, Rev. J. B., Reminiscences, 309. H. Halpine, Colonel, 63, 278 Hammond, Surgeon-General, 274, 275 Hanks, Dennis, 299. Harris, Hon., Ira, 175. Hay, John, 45, 149. Henderson, Rev. Mr., 320. Henry, Dr., (Oregon,) 302. Herndon, Hon., Wm. H.; analysis of Mr. Lincoln's character, 323. Higby, Hon., William, 5; as a flat-boatman, 267; Louisiana negro, 268; Stonewall Jackson, 268; reply to Kentuckians, 269; letter to General Wadsworth, 270; extract from speech in Congress, 271; browsing around, 272; the negro porter, 272; Rev. Dr. Bellows and Surgeon-General Hammond, 274; the election of President the people's business, 275; appointment of chaplains, 277; appreciation of humor, 278; public opinion baths, 281; on the Lord's side, 282; going down with colors flying, 282; opinion of General Grant, 253;
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Address to Christians throughout the World, signed by ninety-five Clergymen of the Confederate States. The American Union, its Effect on National Character and Policy, by James Spence. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Reply of S. Teackle Wallis, Esq., to the Letter of Hon. John Sherman, published by the Officers of the First Maryland Infantry, 1863. Address on the Constitution and Laws of the Confederate States of America, by Hon. Robt. H. Smith. Confederate States' Almanac of 1862. Senator Hammond and the Tribune, by, Troup. Rev. J. H. Thornwell, D. D., of Columbia, S. C., on the State of the Country in 1861. The North and the South, by John Forsyth, of Mobile, Ala. Proceedings of the Congress of the Confederate States, on the announcement of the death of Hon. John Tyler, Jan'y 20th and 21st, 1862. . Addresses of Hon. D. W. Voorhees, of Indiana, on the trial of John E. Cook, Nov. 8th, 1859, and before the Literary Societies of the University of Virginia, July 4th, 1860. Life a
impetuous was the first charge, the whole command would have been thrown into the wildest confusion, and, as a necessary consequence, suffered a severe loss and a disastrous defeat. The force was in the hands of a master. Speedily making his dispositions, the General hurled upon the insolent and advancing enemy the Fifth New-York cavalry--a regiment never known to falter in an emergency. General Stuart in person led the charging column, and the Fifth was led by General Farnsworth and Major Hammond. For some time the contest hung in the balance, but General Custer's brigade returning after a severe struggle, which lasted nearly four hours, the enemy was forced to retire. They lost in this engagement a stand of colors, fifty men--ten of whom were killed — and included among the latter was Captain James Dickenson, of Baltimore, attached to the Tenth Virginia cavalry. Lieutenant-Colonel Payne, of the same regiment was taken prisoner, together with forty others — officers of the line
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
Grant         2       2 River Defense Boats.                   Warrior, Capt. John A. Stephenson         1       1 Stonewall Jackson, Capt. Geo. W. Philips           1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burdett Paris         1       1 R. J. Breckinridge, Capt. James Smith.           1     1 Total 2 4 4 10 15 2 1 2 40 Unarmed tugs. Landis, Captain Davis, and W. Burton, Captain Hammond (tenders to the Louisiana); Phoenix, Captain James Brown (tender to the Manassas); Mosher, Captain Sherman, and Belle Algerine, Captain Jackson (k); Music, Captain McClellan (tender to the forts); Star, Captain Laplace (telegraph boat). The last four were chartered by the army. Grand total of Confederate guns, 166. Confederate Army. Major-General Mansfield Lovell. Coast defenses, Brig.-Gen. Johnson K. Duncan. forts Jackson an
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
ront or assist the other two brigades. Foster began battle at eight o'clock. His troops consisted of the Twenty-third, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-seventh Massachusetts, commanded respectively by Colonels Kurtz, Stevenson, Upton, and Lee; and the Tenth Connecticut, Colonel Drake. At the same time Reno pushed on toward the Confederate right flank, while Parke took position on their front. Foster was supported on his left by the boat-howitzers, manned by Lieutenants McCook, Hammond, Daniels, and Tillotson, with marines and a detachment of the Union Coast Guard. Before the Confederate center was placed a 12-pounder steel cannon, under Captain Bennett, of the Cossack, who was assisted in its management by twenty of that ship's crew; and on the left of the insurgents was Captain Dayton's battery, from the transport Highlander. Foster's brigade bore the brunt of the battle for about four hours. In response to his first gun, the assailed ran up the Confederate flag wit
tillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosion was teHammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosion was terrific — and some one yelled out Two men killed! I rushed up immediately and saw at once that they were killed. The gun had exploded into a thousand atoms. One of the men had his right arm torn to pieces, and the ribs on that side pulpified, though the skin was not broken. He breathed half an hour. The other poor fellow received a piece of iron under the chin, which passed up into the brain — the blood gushing from his nose and ears. He never breathed afterward. A third man received a s
tillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosion was teHammond and I retired some ten or twelve yards. The gun was fired — the explosion was terrific — and some one yelled out Two men killed! I rushed up immediately and saw at once that they were killed. The gun had exploded into a thousand atoms. One of the men had his right arm torn to pieces, and the ribs on that side pulpified, though the skin was not broken. He breathed half an hour. The other poor fellow received a piece of iron under the chin, which passed up into the brain — the blood gushing from his nose and ears. He never breathed afterward. A third man received a s
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Appendix C, p. 31. (search)
of the subject began; but I am unable to lay my hand on the speech, in which, if I recollect rightly, this view was taken by the distinguished senator. I find the following extracts from the speeches of two distinguished southern senators, in The Union, a spirited paper published at St. Cloud, Minnesota: It was often said at the North, and admitted by candid statesmen at the South, that anti-slavery agitation strengthened rather than weakened slavery. Here are the admissions of Senator Hammond on this point, in a speech which he delivered in South Carolina, October 24, 1858:-- And what then (1833) was the state of opinion in the South? Washington had emancipated his slaves. Jefferson had bitterly denounced the system, and had done all that he could to destroy it. Our Clays, Marshalls, Crawfords, and many other prominent Southern men, led off in the colonization scheme. The inevitable effect in the South was that she believed slavery to be an evil — weakness — disgracefu
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