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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Paul F. Hammond or search for Paul F. Hammond in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign of General E. Kirby Smith in Kentucky, in 1862. (search)
Campaign of General E. Kirby Smith in Kentucky, in 1862. by Paul F. Hammond. Prefatory Note.--This narrative was written in the spring of 1863, a few months after the return of the Confederate armies to Tennessee, more for the purpose of recording the facts, while they were fresh in my memory, than from any view of publishing, then or thereafter. It may contain reflections and speculations which will seem novel, curious, and perhaps absurd, to the reader of to-day, especially in the light of subsequent events; and doubtless there are many crudities which one, ambitions for the reputation of a fine writer, would not willingly submit to public criticism. But it may be that those very reflections which appear the least reasonable to the reader who was not familiar, from personal experience, with the tone of thought and feeling, the hopes and fears and aspirations of the soldiers and citizens of the Southern Confederacy, will serve, in some measure, to give the truest pictures of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. By Paul F. Hammond. Paper no. 2. General Kirby Smith is comparatively young — just fairly entering upon the prime of life. He is thirty-seven. You would not be impressed as by a man of remarkable intellectual endowments, but the phrenologist would say, that his high, receding forehead, narrow at the base, but prominent over the eyes, and widening as it ascends, gives evidence, if not of great mental powers, of uncommon quickness of perception and rapid mental movements. Tall, sinewy, not graceful, every gesture indicates intense physical activity and muscular vigor. In perfect health, black haired, black bearded and mustached, slightly graying, black eyes, penetrating and restless, swarth complexion; the simple statement of these features might give the idea of only the rude, rough soldier; but on the contrary, with the exception of the gentle Pegram, I have known no officer of the army more habitually under the influence
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. by Major Paul F. Hammond.--paper no. 3. The next day--Sunday--the army remained in the vicinity of Richmond, and the day was occupied in paroling prisoners, burying the dead and taking care of the wounded. In this the Federals were given every facility, and treated with consideration and humanity. The able and humane medical director of our army, Dr. S. A. Smith, of Louisiana, offered their surgeons an equal share in the hospitals and hospital stores. In every respect, by officers and by privates, the prisoners were treated with greatest courtesy. In the main they appreciated it, and conducted themselves very well. But one instance, a piece of sharp practice occurred, worthy of notice, as illustrating the absurd and lying boastfulness of a large portion of the Northern press in this war, and, at the same time, the low cunning which has made the name Yankee, in a certain sense odious, and only another synonym for trickery and treachery the wor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. No. 4. by Major Paul F. Hammond. It is not without anxiety that I now approach that part of the campaign in Kentucky which brought disaster upon our arms. Hitherto I have had to speak only of success and award well merited praise; but it devolves upon me now to deal with failure, and to try to show wherein lay the causes of it. To ascertain how far defeat is the result of inevitable accident, and how far it comes from errors which should have been avoided, to what extent fortune intervenes to wrest away fruits fairly won, and to what extent they are lost by faults of conception or of execution, requires a knowledge of facts in detail and an accuracy and nice discrimination of judgment not easily attained. It is natural, therefore, to approach with diffidence and much misgiving the discussion of these grave and difficult questions. On the 13th of September General Bragg reached Glasgow, Ky., and on the 15th advanced on Mumfordsvill