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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 129 9 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 100 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 74 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 63 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Wade Hampton or search for Wade Hampton in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 4 document sections:

son's troops fell in behind Gregg's line, somewhat the worse for their morning's adventure. When the Army of the Potomac commenced crossing the Rapidan on the 4th, General J. E. B. Stuart, commanding the Confederate cavalry, began concentrating his command on the right of Lee's infantry, bringing it from Hamilton's crossing and other points where it had been wintering. Stuart's force at this date was a little more than eight thousand men, organized in two divisions, commanded by Generals Wade Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades, commanded by Generals Gordon, Young, and Rosser; Fitzhugh Lee's division comprised three brigades also, Generals W. H. F. Lee, Lomax, and Wickham commanding them. Information of this concentration, and of the additional fact that the enemy's cavalry about Hamilton's crossing was all being drawn in, reached me on the 5th, which obviated all necessity for my moving on that point as I intended at the onset of the c
dowed his intention of using his cavalry in connection with the manoeuvres of his infantry by issuing an order himself, now that Stuart was dead, directing that the three divisions of cavalry serving with the army [Lee's] will constitute separate commands, and will report directly to and receive orders from the headquarters of the army. The order indicates that since Stuart's death the Confederate cavalry had been re-organized into three divisions, that were commanded respectively by General Wade Hampton, General Fitzhugh Lee, and General W. H. F. Lee, the additional division organization undoubtedly growing out of the fact that General M. C. Butler's brigade of about four thousand men had joined recently from South Carolina. When this force developed in Gregg's front, he attacked the moment his troops could be dismounted; and the contest became one of exceeding stubborness, for he found confronting him Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's divisions, supported by what we then supposed to
d toward Gordonsville, under command of General Wade Hampton, the information being confirmed by a st determine. On the night of the 10th General Hampton's division camped about three miles northlayton's. Fitzhugh Lee's division was to join Hampton at Clayton's store from Louisa Court House, b Court House to Clayton's store to unite with Hampton. Custer, the moment he found himself in H House road. The effect of this was to force Hampton back, and his division was so hard pushed thaup and proceeded to Twyman's Store, while General Hampton's main body moved down the south bank of vance of the Confederate cavalry corps, while Hampton discovered from it that we were already in poion: the Trevillian raid. Meanwhile, General Hampton, who had conjectured that I would try to bbornly resisting — to Hopewell Church, where Hampton ceased to press him. Gregg's losses were llowed by my troops in like manner. When General Hampton discovered this, he moved to Drury's Bluf[9 more...]
eing signal till he reached the vicinity of Stony Creek depot on his return. At this point General Hampton, with his own and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, got between Wilson and the Army of the Potomac, t Potomac should cover the Weldon road the next day, the Southside road the day after, and that Hampton having followed Sheridan toward Gordonsville. I need not fear any trouble from him. I doub a great degree control our movements after leaving Burkeville. If Sheridan will look after Hampton, I apprehend no difficulty, and hope to be able to do the enemy great damage. The ammunitio would be, but Wilson is in error when he intimates that he was assured that I would look after Hampton. I do not think General Meade's instructions are susceptible of this interpretation. I received no orders requiring me to detain Hampton. On the contrary, when I arrived at the White House my instructions required me to break up the depot there, and then bring the train across the Peninsul