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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 129 9 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 100 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 74 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 63 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Wade Hampton or search for Wade Hampton in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
tle of Big Bethel and up to the arrival of General McClellan the events of the war in and around Fort Monroe were, with few exceptions, of minor importance. On July 1st, 1861, Brigadier-General Peirce, under orders from General Butler, occupied Hampton, and at once proceeded to intrench. In this work the volunteers were assisted by former slaves. When General Magruder sent some cavalry to Hampton with orders to burn the village, a stampede of the Union soldiers occurred. Our forces on the eHampton with orders to burn the village, a stampede of the Union soldiers occurred. Our forces on the east side of I the bridge were greatly surprised when the disorganized troops and the contrabands came dashing over. The Confederate cavalrymen sent to burn the beautiful village remained, and at night we saw flames issuing from several buildings. We Major Theodore Winthrop. From a Portrait. could readily discern the incendiaries going about the streets setting fire to the houses. In August, 1861, General John E. Wool was appointed to succeed General Butler in command at Fort Monroe. Ea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
r six miles long. The only thing he ought to have done, or had time to do, was postponed almost twenty hours--the putting General Lee, who was near, in command of the army. The operations of the Confederate troops in this battle were very much retarded by the broad ponds of rain-water,--in many places more than knee-deep,--by the deep mud, and by the dense woods and thickets that covered the ground. Brigadier-General Hatton was among the killed, and Brigadier-Generals Pettigrew and Hampton were severely wounded. The latter kept his saddle, and served to the end of the action. Among the killed on the Williamsburg road were Colonels Moore, of Alabama, Jones, and Lomax. In the two days battle, the Confederate loss, so far as the reports indicate, was 6134 (including the loss in G. W. Smith's division, which was 1283); and the Federal loss, according to the revised returns, was 5031. Prisoners to the number of 350, 10 pieces of artillery, 6700 muskets and rifles in excellen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
l Gustavus W. Smith. Couriers: Capt. R. W. Carter's Co. 1st Va. Cav. Smith's division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting (temporarily). Whiting's Brigade, Col. E. McIver Law: 4th Ala.; 2d Miss.; 11th Miss.; 6th N. C. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 286; m, 42 = 346. Hood's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood: 18th Ga., Col. W. T. Wofford, or Lieut.-Col. So Z. Ruff; 1st Tex., Col. A. T. Rainey; 4th Tex., Col. John Marshall; 5th Tex., Col. James J. Archer, Brigade loss: w, 13. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton, (w): 14th Ga.; 19th Ga.; 16th N. C.; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 284=329. Hatton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Hatton (k): 1st Tenn.; 7th Tenn.; 14th Tenn. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 187; m, 13 = 244. Pettigrew's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. J. Pettigrew (w and c): Arkansas Battalion; 35th Ga.; 22d N. C.; 47th Va. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 240; m, 54 == 341. The Official Records indicate that Semmes's and Griffith's brigades were in position for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
crossing, I halted for the purpose of giving instructions to General Wade Hampton, whose brigade had reached the rear of Pettigrew's. Generalsdid not again see either of them until after dark. I directed General Hampton to lead his brigade to the left, on the wood road, a little momade at the time. parallel to theNine-mile road, which would bring Hampton into line of battle on Pettigrew's left, in the attack General Johe line of battle formed by the brigades of Whiting, Pettigrew, and Hampton. In the meantime the action had commenced near Fair Oaks. On readirection almost exactly opposite to that in which I had given General Hampton to understand that General Johnston's movement would be made. hit ing's brigade was pressed back on the right, and learning that Hampton and Pettigrew were suffering great losses in the small wood, 600 ode reached the front line of battle; and in a very few minutes General Hampton was severely wounded. In this state of affairs, I sent word t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
149 == 179. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Brig.-Gen. J. R. Jones (w), Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr.: 21st Va., Maj. John B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Maj. John B. Moseley; 42d Va., Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Capt. John M. Vermillion; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh; Va. Batty. (Hampden Arty.), Capt. William H. Caskie. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 15 == 16. Third Brigade, Col. S. V. Fulkerson (mu w), Col. E. T. H. Warren, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Capt. A. V. Scott; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams; Va. Battery (Danville Arty.), Capt. George W. Wooding. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 15; m, 1==18. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander R. Lawton: 13th Ga., Col. Marcellus Douglass; 26th Ga., Col. E. N. Atkinson; 31st Ga., Col. C. A. Evans (w); 38th Ga., Lieut.-Col. L. J. Parr (w), Capt. William H. Battey; 60th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. H. Stiles; 61st Ga., Col. John H. Lamar. Brigade loss: k, 115; w, 4
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
ommand that Burnside brought from North Carolina.--Editors. (Burnside's, under Reno), constituting the right wing, were assembling. Our formal assignment to the Ninth Corps was made a day or two later. On the 8th, the division was ordered to take the advance and marched to Brookville; on the 9th to Goshen; on the 11th to Ridgeville, and on the 12th, shortly after noon, to Frederick City, being the first to enter that place, and driving out the Confederate rear-guard of cavalry under General Wade Hampton. The insignificant skirmish which occurred there had a considerable influence upon the battle of the 14th, in an indirect way. The enemy's cavalry had been driven from the banks of the Monocacy River and retired into the town. The division, consisting of two brigades (Moor's and Scammon's), had crossed at the stone bridge on the National road, and Moor's, deployed on both sides of the turn-pike, advanced upon the city. Colonel Moor himself, with a troop of cavalry and a single cann
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
lson: Va. Battery (Amherst Art'y), Capt. T. J. Kirkpatrick; Va. Battery (Fluvanna Art'y), Capt. John J. Ancell; Va. Battery, Capt. Charles T. Huckstep; Va. Battery, Capt. Marmaduke Johnson; Ga. Battery (Milledge Art'y), Capt. John Milledge. Miscellaneous: Va. Battery, Capt. W. E. Cutshaw; Va. Battery (Dixie Art'y), Capt. W. It. Chapman; Va. Battery (Magruder Art'y), Capt. T. J. Page, Jr.; Va. Battery, Capt. W. H. Rice. cavalry, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton: 1st N. C., Col. L. S. Baker; 2d S. C., Col. M. C. Butler: 10th Va.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. P. M. B. Young (w), Maj. William G. Delony; Jeff. Davis (Miss.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Martin. Lee's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee: 1st Va., Lieut.-Col. L. T. Brien; 3d Va., Lieut.-Col. John T. Thornton (mo w); 4th Va., Col. W. C. Wickham; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va.,----. Robertson's Brigade, Col. Thomas T. Munford: 2d Va., Lieut.-Col. Richard H. Burks; 7th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson's intentions at Harper's Ferry. (search)
ning and intercept such of the enemy as may attempt to escape from Harper's Ferry. Jackson's advance division reached the vicinity of Harper's Ferry during Saturday forenoon, the 13th; Walker and McLaws reached the designated points Saturday night, but were not in position for offensive action until September 14th. Now, when the army was moving to the positions assigned by Special orders no. 191, it was a matter of common knowledge that McClellan's advance was in contact with our rear. Hampton had a sharp affair in the streets of Frederick late on the 12th. Fitz Lee, hanging on to the advance, located McClellan and reported his presence to Stuart, who held the mountain pass over Catoctin at Hagan's. During the 13th Stuart delayed the advance of the Federal infantry through Middletown Valley by sturdily defending the practicable points on the National road. On the 14th, when, according to General Walker, Jackson, then a day late, proposed to give the commander of Harper's Ferr