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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 129 9 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 100 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 74 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 63 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wade Hampton or search for Wade Hampton in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduri, to the effect that General Magruder should be kept advised by us, in order that his command might be concentrated near Hampton when our attack should be made. The movement was prevented in consequence of a large portion of the command having beens known, Breckinridge was sent back to Rockfish Gap to unite with Vaughan (who had succeeded Jones) in opposing Hunter. Hampton, at the same time, was sent to drive back Sheridan's cavalry, which had been sent forward to meet Hunter at Charlottesvr, General Early, with the Second corps, was detached and ordered in the same direction to ensure the defeat of Hunter. Hampton performed his work admirably, barred Sheridan's progress at Louisa Courthouse, and forced him to return, baffled, from a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ome the weapons with which we are to fight over again, before the forum of the world's judgment, the great war of secession and independence. In that contest the Southern mind and the Southern tongue and pen will not be less brilliant but more successful than than the Southern heart and the Southern sword. Let us do what we can to help this great purpose and end. Fellow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduring page the memory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr., and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
and her draft, over twenty-two feet, prevented her from going to Washington. Her field of operation was therefore restricted to the bay and its immediate vicinity; there was no regular concerted movement with the army. There was, however, an informal understanding between General Magruder, who commanded the Confederate forces on the Peninsula, and the Executive officer, to the effect that General Magruder should be kept advised by us, in order that his command might be concentrated near Hampton when our attack should be made. The movement was prevented in consequence of a large portion of the command having been detached just before the fight. The frigates Congress and Cumberland temptingly invited an attack. It was fixed for Thursday night, March 6th, 1862; the pilots, of whom there were five, having been previously consulted. The sides were slushed, supposing that it would increase the tendency of the projectiles to glance. All preparations were made, including lights at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
king as vigorous steps as his resources permitted, to checkmate this movement in his rear. As soon as the defeat of Jones was known, Breckinridge was sent back to Rockfish Gap to unite with Vaughan (who had succeeded Jones) in opposing Hunter. Hampton, at the same time, was sent to drive back Sheridan's cavalry, which had been sent forward to meet Hunter at Charlottesville and coperate with him in the attempt on Lynchburg. A few days later, General Early, with the Second corps, was detached and ordered in the same direction to ensure the defeat of Hunter. Hampton performed his work admirably, barred Sheridan's progress at Louisa Courthouse, and forced him to return, baffled, from a fruitless expedition. Breckinridge transferred his troops to Lynchburg to hold it as long as he might against Hunter. It was the 13th June that Early left General Lee's lines at Richmond, and on this day Hunter threw forward his advance from Lexington to Buchanan. Early made a rapid march, reaching
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 54 (search)
r long silence should lead you to expect. Upon the very day I wrote to you last, our brigade, with General F. Lee's and Hampton's, started from Lovdon in a southerly direction, encamping at night, for a few hours, near Salem, in Fauquier. This movlling and capturing a few; then halted a few moments to feed, and commenced the march for Rockville, near which town General Hampton was in line of battle, having there had a little fight, in which he captured many prisoners and wagons. General HamGeneral Hampton supposing the enemy to be in force near the town, waited for us to come up before making an attack. When we came up, a charge was ordered, which the squadron I commanded led, Company K taking a road to the right, and Company C moving straight e enemy in this fight was very great, indeed. We suffered considerably, but small, I think, in proportion to them. General Hampton who led the second charge, was severely wounded. Ashton is missing in our company; Rust (mortally); Carroll and Pal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
eneral J. E. Johnston, General J. A. Early, and Colonel W. H. Taylor, of Virginia; General G. T. Beauregard, Louisiana; General D. H. Hill, North Carolina; General Wade Hampton, South Carolina; General J. B. Gordon, Georgia; General W. J. Hardee, Alabama; General S. D. Lee, Mississippi; General R. S. Ewell, Tennessee; General J. Bay's proceedings, and announced the following Marshals and Assistant Marshals, all of whom were mounted and distinguished by sashes: Chief Marshal, Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton. Marshals: General R. D. Lilley, Colonel W. T. Poague, Colonel John A. Gibson, Colonel J. D. H. Ross, Major Charles F. Jordan, Major W. Paxton, Mr. Jostitute; seventh, specially invited guests; eighth, members of the Lee Memorial Association. Among the more notable persons present on the platform were Generals Wade Hampton, of South Carolina; J. A. Early, of Virginia; William Smith, (the last war Governor of Virginia); William Terry, of Wytheville, Virginia; George H. Steuart
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
hard fighters knew how to appreciate kindness shown them in the hour of their need. The exercises were appropriately closed with the benediction by Rev. Dr. J. L. Burrows, of Norfolk, Va. The homes of the city were thrown wide open to the men whom Lexington always gladly greeted in the shifting scenes of the war, and far famed Blue Grass hospitality was abundantly illustrated. We found our home with our old friend Major H. B. McClellan, who used to ride so gallantly with Stuart and Hampton as Adjutant-General of the cavalry corps, Army of Northern Virginia, and has, with his accomplished wife, made the Sayre Female Institute so renowned for honest teaching and accomplished graduates. Major McClellan has made considerable progress in his Biography of J. E. B. Stuart, and having had the privilege of reading some of the chapters, we do not hesitate to say that the work is admirably done, and will be a very valuable contribution to the history of the Army of Northern Virginia.