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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 129 9 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 100 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 74 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 65 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 63 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Wade Hampton or search for Wade Hampton in all documents.

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, and some ship-yards were burned. Five miles below the city of Norfolk is Crany Island, lying at the entrance of the harbor, three miles from Hampton Roads.--During the last war with England this was the scene of a battle. On the 22d of June, 1813, a large fleet made an attack upon it, with a force of about 4,000 men, but met with a serious defeat. The loss to the enemy was two hundred, while the Virginians did not lose a man. The fortifications on this island were erected by Maj. Gen. Wade Hampton, then in command of this district. One more event of interest, and I have done. In the year 1856, the city of Norfolk was the scene of a serious and fatal epidemic that has been appropriately denominated "the great pestilence in Virginia." The yellow fever swept through the town until it was more than decimated. The tale of horrors that terrible disease unfolded, beggars the power of words to describe. It has, however, been made the subject of an interesting book from the pen