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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
), Col. Patrick E. Burke. Loss: r, 6; w, 14; m, 3 = 23. Sixth division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. McKean. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin Allen, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur: 21st Mo., Col. David Moore, Maj. Edwin Moore; 16th Wis., Maj. Thomas Reynolds; 17th Wis., Col. John L. Doran. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 67; m, 23 = 101. Second Brigade, Col. John M. Oliver: Indpt. Co.,, Ill. Cav., Capt. William Ford; 15th Mich., Lieut.-Col. John McDermott; 18th Mo. (4 co's), Capt. Jacob R. Ault; 14th Wis., Col. John Hancock; 18th Wis., Col. Gabriel Bouck. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 108; m, 38 = 191. Third Brigade, Col. Marcellus M. Crocker: 11th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William Hall; 13th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Shane; 15th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William W. Belknap, Col. Hugh T. Reid; 16th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Addison H. Sanders (w), Maj. William Purcell. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt. Andrew u Hicken-looper: F, 2d Ill., Lieut. J. W. Mitchell; 1st Minn., Lieut. G. F. Cooke; 3d Ohio (section), C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
), Col. Patrick E. Burke. Loss: r, 6; w, 14; m, 3 = 23. Sixth division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. McKean. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin Allen, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur: 21st Mo., Col. David Moore, Maj. Edwin Moore; 16th Wis., Maj. Thomas Reynolds; 17th Wis., Col. John L. Doran. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 67; m, 23 = 101. Second Brigade, Col. John M. Oliver: Indpt. Co.,, Ill. Cav., Capt. William Ford; 15th Mich., Lieut.-Col. John McDermott; 18th Mo. (4 co's), Capt. Jacob R. Ault; 14th Wis., Col. John Hancock; 18th Wis., Col. Gabriel Bouck. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 108; m, 38 = 191. Third Brigade, Col. Marcellus M. Crocker: 11th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William Hall; 13th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Shane; 15th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William W. Belknap, Col. Hugh T. Reid; 16th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Addison H. Sanders (w), Maj. William Purcell. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt. Andrew u Hicken-looper: F, 2d Ill., Lieut. J. W. Mitchell; 1st Minn., Lieut. G. F. Cooke; 3d Ohio (section), C
robably greater a good deal than my own. Gen. Hancock has taken two redoubts and repulsed Early'ssachusetts was sent to the right to support Gen. Hancock, and did good service. The General Commandion was doing nobly on the right and centre. Hancock's brigade, composed of the Fifth Wisconsin, F especially his order for reenforcements to Gen. Hancock, joined him in a ride throughout our lines.f the bayonet, after the thrilling example of Hancock. By four o'clock in the afternoon the larg to the right of the enemy's lines, whereby Gen. Hancock was enabled to undertake the flanking movemed and were possessed by him, and when from Gen. Hancock we learned that the foe was nowhere in sighng to the right, we soon reached the scene of Hancock's brave exploits, and examined the formidableigade, of Casey's division, as a reserve to Gen. Hancock, had early scoured the field. The great ed, if not so brilliant, as heroic service as Hancock. At one o'clock in the morning the eagle-eye[5 more...]
e whole line, since Fair Oaks. They threatened the key of the rebel position before Richmond. Hancock's and Burns's brigades held the most exposed lines. The former had taken a critical position ition, a strong force pressed strongly upon Gen. Burns's picket-line. He sent word instantly to Hancock to prepare for action. The latter was vigilant, but he had hardly received the message, beforeground manfully, and the enemy was briskly driven back, our lads yelling at them triumphantly. Hancock was victorious after a bitter fight, in which two Georgia regiments were almost cut to pieces. ough not half so great as that of the enemy, was not trifling. Among the prisoners captured by Hancock, was one of the smartest and most mischievous of Southern politicians, Col. J. Q. C. Lamar, of and Heintzelman, and Franklin, and Hooker, and Smith, and Sedgwick, and Franklin, and McCall — Hancock, and Davidson, and Meade, and Seymore, and Burns, and Sickles, and Sully, and Owens, and dead W
s made the duty of the President to declare, on or before the first day of July then next following, by his proclamation, in what States and parts of States insurrection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased r
. headquarters army of the Potomac, Williamsburgh, May 6, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I have the pleasure to announce the occupation of this place, as the result of the hard-fought action of yesterday. The effect of Hancock's brilliant engagement yesterday afternoon was to turn the left of the enemy's line of works. He was strongly reenforced, and the enemy abandoned the entire position during the night, leaving all his sick and wounded in our hands. The enemy's llent, with scarcely an exception. The enemy's works are very extensive and exceedingly strong, both in respect to their position and the works themselves. Our loss is heavy in Hooker's division, but very little on other parts of the field. Hancock's success was gained with a loss of not more than twenty killed and wounded. Am I authorized to follow the example of other generals, and direct the names of battles to be placed on colors of regiments? We have other battles to fight before
. headquarters army of the Potomac, Williamsburgh, May 6, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I have the pleasure to announce the occupation of this place, as the result of the hard-fought action of yesterday. The effect of Hancock's brilliant engagement yesterday afternoon was to turn the left of the enemy's line of works. He was strongly reenforced, and the enemy abandoned the entire position during the night, leaving all his sick and wounded in our hands. The enemy's llent, with scarcely an exception. The enemy's works are very extensive and exceedingly strong, both in respect to their position and the works themselves. Our loss is heavy in Hooker's division, but very little on other parts of the field. Hancock's success was gained with a loss of not more than twenty killed and wounded. Am I authorized to follow the example of other generals, and direct the names of battles to be placed on colors of regiments? We have other battles to fight before
parties were immediately despatched in different directions to find the enemy. Major James M. Deems was sent with three companies eight miles towards Sperryville, as far as Devil's Run, but no enemy in force was found. A few bushwhackers were seen, and three of them taken prisoners. The Major returned to town at sundown, when he was again ordered, and with six companies, namely, company L, Capt. Thistleton; company I, Captain Charles Russell; company H, Captain Grafflin; company B, Capt. John Hancock; company D, Lieut. Marsdorf, and company E, Lieut. Joseph Cook. The order was to proceed at once to Rapidan station, and burn the large railroad bridge over the Rapidan River. Six miles from Fairfax the command was fired upon by the enemy, when a brisk skirmish for ten miles in succession took place, the enemy being driven rapidly before us. On the arrival at the railroad bridge, where the enemy's guards were stationed, a sharp encounter took place, in which a secesh Lieutenant by the
ators. Ebenezer Bridge37 Josiah Stone36 Abraham Fuller37 Eleazer Brooks37 Jonas Dix35 Joseph Hosmer3 At the fourth annual election, April 7, 1783, Governor Hancock had, in Medford, 36 votes; Lieutenant-Governor Gushing, 30. Each Senator had 24. These facts show remarkable political harmony in the town. The recognittowards Lexington, and did duty through the day. Lieut. Gould, taken prisoner at Concord, was committed to his custody at Medford. He was chaplain in the frigate Hancock, in 1777, when she captured the British frigate Fox. Afterwards, when the Hancock and Fox were retaken by the British off Halifax, he was carried there as prisonHancock and Fox were retaken by the British off Halifax, he was carried there as prisoner of war, but was soon released. He had not money to give, but he would have given his life, to the American cause. He died at Medford, May 6, 1781, aged 48. Medford took steps to pay its debts at the earliest period. It was to be done by degrees; and, May 12, 1785, they vote thus: To raise £ 400 to defray the expenses of th
Charlestown, caused great stir at Medford. Mr. John Hancock, grandfather of the patriot of 1775, who preac was five shillings per week. In November, 1693, Mr. Hancock's ministrations ceased, and the town voted to appford. Mr. Angier, of Watertown, gave the charge; Mr. Hancock, of Lexington, the right hand of fellow-ship. Th Watertown; Mr. William Brattle, of Cambridge; Mr. John Hancock, of Lexington; Mr. Simon Bradstreet, of Charleone, the Rev. Mr. Angier proceeded to ordination; Mr. Hancock, Mr. Bradstreet, and Mr. Parsons joining in the imposition of hands. After this, the Rev. Mr. Hancock gave me the right hand of fellowship. We then sung partprocuring a minister; and Rev. Messrs. Colman, Fox, Hancock, Brown, and Appleton were invited to conduct the rellowing; viz., the Rev. Dr. Cotton Mather, the Rev. Mr. John Hancock, the Rev. Mr. Benjamin Colman, the Rev. Mr the grace of God in vain. This being done, the Rev. Mr. Hancock proceeded to ordination,--Mr. Colman, Mr. Ap
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