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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 54 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ed. Down he came upon our left with a momentum that nothing could check. The rifled guns that lay before our infantry on a knoll were in danger of capture. General Hancock was wounded in the thigh, General Gibbon in the shoulder. The Fifth corps, as the First and Second wavered anew, went into the breach with such shouts and su, however, he sent for General Ewell. When the latter arrived many precious moments had been lost. But the enemy, who did not see its value until the arrival of Hancock, had not yet appeared in force. General Hays told me ten years after the battle that he could have seized the heights without the loss of ten men. Here we see G anticipated my attack on the 3d, and was determined, if we moved our army in a direct column of assault, to attack it upon the flanks and destroy it. He told General Hancock upon the evening of the 3d that if we attacted him he would throw the Fifth and Sixth Corps upon the enemy's flank. This determination was thwarted by the po
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
n of the subject, I give a letter from Major General Hancock, and also one from Colonel Bachelder. seven of them being Generals Commanding. General Hancock writes of him to General Humphrey's: Mr. sed by any one else. ) Letter from General Winfield Hancock. New York, January 17th, 1878. der the command and magnetic influence of General Hancock--who in the meantime had reached the fielwas ordered to move up to Gettysburg, but General Hancock met it on the road on his return to Taneydelay would have been involved in doubt. General Hancock says that an attempt had been made to refm mander's, testimony). Of the Eleventh, (see Hancock,) 1,200. Estimating Buford's cavalry at abouto me). It will be noticed, however, that General Hancock says that portions of the Second and Thirexcept in an attack on fortified places. General Hancock, the opposing commander, does not enumerathen up. Mark the point-the the Second corps, Hancock's, 12,088, by the return of June 30th, was in[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
had charged his position in the afternoon of the 2d. He says: The Third corps received the shock most heroically. Troops from the Second were sent by Major-General Hancock to cover the right flank of the Third corps, and soon after the assault commenced. The Fifth corps most fortunately arrived and took position on the left briefly review the situation on the morning of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the ground lying between General Hancock's left and Round Top, General Geary's division of the Twelfth corps occupying part of the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupyPickett's division was 4,500 bayonets. It was printed at 5,500. In the paragraph where I stated that General Meade anticipated my attack of the 3d, and told General Hancock that he intended to throw the Fifth and Sixth corps against its flanks when it was made, it is printed that he gave this information in the evening, when, of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
or at any other hour in the forenoon, is an utter failure. It is sought to sustain it by the testimony of Federal officers, by detaching scraps of their testimony from the context, in order to give them a different meaning from that intended by the parties testifying. Here is what is said on that head in the article: Let us briefly review the situation on the morning of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the ground lying between General Hancock's left and Round Top, General Geary's division of the Twelfth corps occupying part of the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupy Round Top if it were practicable; and in reply to his question as to what sort of position it was, General Sickles had answered, There is no position there. At the first signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d, General Sickles became apprehensive that we were about to attack him, and so reported to General Meade. As our move pr
the United States Army or the Volunteers. In some cases for distinguished gallantry or marked efficiency brevet rank higher than the next grade above was given. The date is that of the appointment. Lieutenant-General, United States army (full rank) Grant, Ulysses S., Mar. 2, 1864. Lieutenant-General, United States army (by Brevet) Scott, Winfield, Mar. 29, 1847. Major-generals, United States army (full rank) Fremont, J. C., May 14, 1861. Halleck, H. W., Aug. 19, 1861. Hancock, Winfield, July 26, 1866. McClellan, G. B., May 14, 1861. Meade, G. G., Aug. 18, 1864. Sheridan, P. H., Nov. 8, 1864. Sherman, Wm. T., Aug. 12, 1864. Thomas, Geo. H., Dec. 15, 1864. Wool, John E., May 16, 1862. Major-generals, United States army (by Brevet) Allen, Robert, Mar. 13, 1865. Ames, Adelbert, Mar. 13, 1865. Anderson, Robert, Feb. 3, 1865. Arnold, Richard, Mar. 13, 1865. Augur, Chris. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Averell, Wm. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Ayres, R. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Baird
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg--report of General Junius Daniel. (search)
ly, on the first day. Major Winston, however, notwithstanding the painful character of his wound, did not quit the field, but remained with his regiment until late in the engagement of the 3d July, when a second wound, more severe than the first, compelled him to retire; both of these officers were wounded while leading their men in an advance upon the enemy. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, Second North Carolina battalion, was killed July 1st while gallantly leading his men in a charge. Major Hancock, of this battalion, at the same time received a wound through the breast. Major Lewis, of the Thirty-second, severely wounded at the close of the first day's fight, and Colonel Kernan, of the Forty-third regiment, severely wounded on the 3d July while leading his men against the enemy's works. These officers, with the exception of Captain Hammond, are in the hands of the enemy. I desire also to mention specially Colonel E. C. Brabble, Thirty-second; Lieutenant-Colonel W. G. Lewis, F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee to the rear --the incident with Harris' Mississippi brigade. (search)
s his intention to relieve Hill's two divisions with Longstreet's, and throw them farther to the left, to fill up a part of the great unoccupied interval between the Plank road and Ewell's right, near the Old turnpike, or use them on his right, as the occasion might demand. It was unfortunate that any of these troops should have become aware they were to be relieved by Longstreet. It is certain that owing to this impression, Wilcox's division, on the right, was not in condition to receive Hancock's attack at early dawn on the morning of the 6th, by which they were driven back in considerable confusion. In fact some of the brigades of Wilcox's division came back in disorder, but sullenly and without panic, entirely across the Plank road, where General Lee and the gallant Hill in person helped to rally them. The assertion, made by several writers, that Hill's troops were driven back a mile and a half, is a most serious mistake. The right of his line was thrown back several hundred
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
redoubt on our extreme left, defended by General Hancock with five regiments and ten guns, affords, and to have resulted in the easy capture of Hancock's whole command, had due precaution been take no mood to detain the flying foe, and orders Hancock to retire. The latter, well knowing the lucknnoying to Fort Magruder, 'tis said, although Hancock showed no signs of making use of the positionhave been no necessity for this, however, for Hancock's fire had done no damage all day, and was noing to fall back farther for the night. (See Hancock's report, battle of Williamsburg.) The Confedteady are clearly heard. In a. word, General Winfield Hancock's five regiments and ten guns have beof Her Majesty's Scotch Fusileers, who was in Hancock's redoubt, and saw the charge, made himself kengagements of the war, and declared that General Hancock merited the highest praise So far from prwere evidently the main body itself. See General Hancock's official report of the arrangement of h[16 more...]