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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 241 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 217 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 208 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 169 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 158 36 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 81 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 72 20 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 71 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 68 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hancock or search for Hancock in all documents.

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k of the action. Then McClellan's long-range guns materially assisted the Union advance, but later in the day the demand for artillery was so great that when General Hancock asked for more to assist his attenuated line, he could not get them until he finally borrowed one battery from Franklin. After the battle ended (September 17everely from the fire of the Federal guns. At 10 A. M., September 17th, two of Sumner's batteries were being closely assailed by Confederate sharpshooters, and Hancock formed a line of guns and infantry to relieve them. Cowan's battery of 3-inch guns, Frank's 12-pounders, and From private to General: Brigadier-General Robertporting infantry, a brigade, drove away the threatening skirmishers and silenced the Confederate batteries. The demand for artillery was so great that when General Hancock asked for more guns to assist his attenuated line, the request could not be complied with. However, he borrowed, for a time, from Franklin, one battery, and
he body of the Confederate Brigadier-General John R. Chambliss, by Federal cavalrymen under Gregg. Chambliss had been killed in an engagement with these troopers near White Oak Branch, seven miles from Richmond, on August 16, 1864. Early that month Grant heard that reinforcements were being sent to General Early in the Shenandoah for the purpose of threatening Washington. In order to compel the recall of these troops, and to cause the weakening of the Confederate lines before Petersburg, Hancock took the Second and part of the Ninth Corps and Gregg's cavalry to the north side of the James, threatening the works of Richmond. On the morning of August 16th, Gregg advanced on the right of the Federal line toward White's Tavern, near White Oak Branch. It was here that the action, the death of Chambliss, and the capture of the map took place. Even with the plans of the Southerners thus unexpectedly in their possession, the Federals were unable to pass these defenses until Lee's little