hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Hancock or search for James Hancock in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nts of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captung for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expressioniry of several persons if they had seen a lost corpse anywhere. Hancock's sudden death was a part of his plan to escape. While he had gres to be picked up by a patrol; to remain was to be hunted down. Hancock had money sewed in the lining of his vest, and he walked straight to have his mouth drawn to one side. The men were bewildered, and Hancock was feeling for letters to prove his identity, when the hotel clerthe Castle, and there a wonderful thing occurred. Guards who knew Hancock's face perfectly well, were so confused by his squint that no man in vain. She died on the 12th of August, 1835, at the house of Mrs. Hancock, the daughter of Dr. Davidson In a letter written in after years
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
f the occupants of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under ci while waiting for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expression and great pnd made inquiry of several persons if they had seen a lost corpse anywhere. Hancock's sudden death was a part of his plan to escape. While he had great nerve and the city was to be picked up by a patrol; to remain was to be hunted down. Hancock had money sewed in the lining of his vest, and he walked straight to the best s-eyed, and to have his mouth drawn to one side. The men were bewildered, and Hancock was feeling for letters to prove his identity, when the hotel clerk happened tr, taken to the Castle, and there a wonderful thing occurred. Guards who knew Hancock's face perfectly well, were so confused by his squint that no man dared give a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
eutenant in the United States Army. Returning from New Orleans after his resignation from the army, he devoted himself to the care of his invalid wife, making with her the tour of the Virginia Springs, thence to Baltimore and Philadelphia, consulting the highest medical skill with the hope to save the life of the noble woman who had been to him the light of his life and the joy of his household; but all his love and care was in vain. She died on the 12th of August, 1835, at the house of Mrs. Hancock, the daughter of Dr. Davidson In a letter written in after years by this good lady to his son and biographer, among other interesting incidents and characteristics, she narrates one incident which gives the keynote to the life and character of General Johnston. She says of him: In the smallest as in the greatest affairs of his life, he took time to deliberate before acting. I was struck with an observation of his (which goes to prove this) when I remarked that he took a long while to wr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
but still adheres to the charge, that dying in the effort to extend the area of slavery over the free States, he saw, with a clearer vision, that he had been engaged in an unholy cause, and said to one of our officers, who leaned over him, Tell Hancock I have wronged him, and have wronged my country! In the edition sent us there is a foot-note, written in red ink, after the statement concerning Armistead's action at First Manassas, to the following effect: This is a mistake. A Richmond pa and you can put it into any form or make any use of it you may see fit. With thanks to Mr. Gerrish and Mr. Moore for their generous defence of the memory of a gallant Confederate, we add the above to the letters of Colonel R. W. Martin, General Hancock, and General Bingham, and respectfully submit that this testimony refutes, beyond all cavil, the reckless slander which General Doubleday based on camp rumor, and to which he clings with a persistence which savors more of the blindness of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
endered him familiar with all the Federal movements in the campaign of 1864, while his subsequent career as commander of Hancock's (Second) corps was not less conspicuous and important. His long and eminent service after the war in Washington placere and some furious battles, the most memorable of which occurred May 12th, when Grant threw the half of his army, under Hancock and Burnside, against Lee's lines. Burnside was repulsed, but Hancock's attack on the Confederate centre was for a timeHancock's attack on the Confederate centre was for a time successful, the Federals capturing a sallient position on Ewell's line with a number of guns and a large part of Johnson's division. All day long raged at this point the sanguinary contest. The ground was piled with dead. A dead tree, nearly twont of Confederates and made a fearful gap in their lines. An assault was at once made by Burnside's corps, supported by Hancock, Warren, and Ord. Some preparations had been made by General Beauregard against such a contingency, but only skill of th