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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 321 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 262 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 225 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 206 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 202 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 101 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 54 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 51 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 50 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Winfield S. Hancock or search for Winfield S. Hancock in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
oon of the 4th, and not only impeded the advance of troops by land, but delayed the movement by water so much that it was not until the morning of the 7th that the leading division — Franklin's — disembarked near West Point and took up a suitable position to hold its own and cover the landing of reenforcements. This division was attacked not long after it landed, but easily repulsed the enemy. Meanwhile the enemy's rear-guard held the Williamsburg lines against our advance, except where Hancock broke through, until the night of the 5th, when they retired [see map, p. 188]. The army was now divided: a part at the mouth of the Pamunkey, a part at Williamsburg, and a part at Yorktown prepared to ascend the York River. The problem was to reunite them without giving the enemy the opportunity of striking either fraction with his whole force. This was accomplished on the 10th, when all the divisions were in communication, and the movement of concentration continued as rapidly as cir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
on the arrival before Williamsburg, formed the brigades of Hancock and Brooks for an advance through a piece of woods which s two of their forts unoccupied. I immediately ordered General Hancock to advance with a brigade and ten pieces of artillery,orced back from Fort Magruder, the threatening position of Hancock on the Confederate left was noted by the enemy, and D. H. , Early and Hill in person leading, toward the crest where Hancock's infantry was posted. The Confederates were met by a se musketry fire, and at length by a counter charge, led by Hancock, in which the bayonet was used in open field. Generals Sumner, Keyes, and Smith all mentioned Hancock's victory, which was brilliant and decisive. General Smith said in his report, General-in-Chief for just praise. General Keyes wrote, If Hancock had failed, the enemy would not have retreated. It was of this action that McClellan telegraphed to his wife, Hancock was superb.--Editors. The division of Kearny, that was com
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
Artillery, Maj. Robert M. West: C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Edward H. Flood: E, 1st Pa., Capt. Theodore Miller; H, 1st Pa., Capt. James Brady. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock (also in temporary command of Davidson's Third Brigade): 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Col. Francis L. Vinton; 49th Pa., Col. William H. Irwin; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 76; m, 1 == 85. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks: 2d Vt., Col. Henry Whiting; 3d Vt., Col. Breed N. Hyde; 4th Vt., Col. Edwin H. Stoughton; 5th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Lewis A. Grant; 6th Vt., Col. Nathan Lord. Brigade loss: w, 2. Third Brigade (temporarily under Hancock's command): 7th Me., Col. Edwin C. Mason; 33d N. Y., Col. Robert F. Taylor; 49th N. Y., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 76th N. Y., Col. James B. McKean. Brigade loss (33d N. Y.): w, 10. Artillery, Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres: 1st N. Y., Lieut. Andrew Cowan; 3d N.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
to a detached affair, unimportant, because it had, and could have, no influence upon the real event. Mr. Davis says of General Early's account of his attack upon Hancock at Williamsburg: He [Early] confidently expresses the opinion that had his attack been supported promptly and vigorously, the enemy's force there engaged musto much that it could not be relied upon next day, and that Kearny's could not do more than hold its own without reenforcements, being satisfied that the result of Hancock's engagement was to give us possession of the decisive point of the battle-field, (luring the night I countermanded the order for the advance of the divisions of gade of that division which took part in the battle. Five regiments of Kearny's division (2 of Birney's brigade and 3 of Berry's) and 6 of Smith's division (4 of Hancock's and 2 of Davidson's) were engaged, so the loss (exclusive of Hooker's) of 528 belonged, in fact, to only 16 regiments.--Editors. Mr. Davis says: Soon af
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
e R. Myers, Maj. John C. Meginnis; 31st N. Y., Col. Calvin E. Pratt (w), Maj. Alexander Raszewski; 32d N. Y., Col. Roderick Matheson; 95th Pa., Col. John M. Gosline (in w), Lieut.-Col. Gustavus W. Town. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 279; in, 114==433. Artillery, Capt. Edward R. Platt: 1st Mass., Capt. Josiah Porter; 1st N. J., Capt. William Hexamer; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Emory Upton. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 13; m, 4==18. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock: 6th. Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Col. Francis L. Vinton; 49th Pa., Col. William H. Irwin; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: k, 9; w, 93; m, 98 == 200. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. H. Brooks (w): 2d Vt., Col. Henry Whiting; 3d Vt., Lieut.-Col. Wheelock G. Veazey; 4th Vt., Col. Edwin H. Stoughton; 5th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Lewis A. Grant; 6th Vt., Col. Nathan Lord, Jr. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 271; m, 139 == 455. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John W. Davidson; 7th Me., C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
ominy moving against General Porter, causing them to fall back and seek some other route of attack. The range was about two and one-half miles. About sundown General Hancock's brigade, which held the extreme right of General Smith's line, was attacked furiously by the enemy. It was nearly dark when the fight began, and the combatants were not fifty yards apart; but General Hancock was, as usual, equal to the occasion, and the enemy was driven back. This fight was preceded by a severe artillery fire from the enemy, which, however, was soon silenced. This day's operations of Smith's division were known as The action at Golding's [or Garnett's] farm. Theeeting with heavy loss, particularly in the 5th Vermont Regiment. Darkness ended the fight. General Brooks was wounded in the leg, but did not leave the field. Hancock's and Davidson's brigades [Smith's division] were posted some distance to the rear to repel an anticipated attack from the right and rear, but were not engaged.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
ositions of Union and Confederate troops. Also disposition of troops during the artillery engagement at White Oak Bridge. Union brigades: 1, Sickles; 2, Carr; 3, Grover; 4, Seymour; 5, Reynolds (Simmons); 6, Meade (this brigade should be represented as north of the road); 7, Robinson; 8, Birney; 9, Berry; 10, Newton; 11, Bartlett; 12,12, Taylor; 13, Burns; 11, 14, Dana; 15,15, Sully; 16, 16, Caldwell; 17, French; 18, Meagher; 19, Na glee (of Keyes's corps); 20, Davidson; 21, Brooks; 22, Hancock. Randol's battery was on the right of the road, Kerns's and Cooper's on the left, and Diederichs's and Knieriem's yet farther to the left. Thompson's battery of Kearny's division was with General Robinson's brigade (7). Confederate brigades: a, Kemper; b, Pickett (Hunton); c, R. II. Anderson (Jenkins); d, Wilcox; e, Featherston; f, Pryor; g, Branch; h, Archer; i, Field; j, J. R. Anderson; k, Pender; l, Gregg; m, n, o, p, Armistead, Wright, Mahone, and Ransom. Of the Confederate batte
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
galloped around field-works. We soon heard of the gallantry of Colonel Grier, Major Lawrence Williams, Captains Sanders, Davis, Baker, and others in cavalry charges, and that the French Princes were among the first in the advance. Lieutenant-Colonel Grier, commanding the 1st ( Old Billy Grier, the bucno commandante ), had led a charge and engaged two of the enemy in personal combat, wounding one and himself receiving a wound. Then came tidings of the dash of Chambliss and McLean leading Hancock's column and crowding the left-center of the enemy's line, and soon the 3d Pennsylvania cavalry met the enemy in the woods and drove him out with skirmishers and canister, and cleared our left toward the James of the enemy's cavalry under Stuart. During the following day, the cavalry were spectators of the battle at Williamsburg (except the 3d Pennsylvania actively engaged on our left) and were only occupied with the rather serious business of procuring food for the horses. Although pur
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
y odds, indeed, but so are stone walls and a steep mountain pass. My losses were 533. The losses in Parham's (Mahone's) brigade, spoken of as heavy, are not reported; those in Cobb's and Semmes's brigades are given as 749. At the end of the fight, after nightfall, the division of the corps which had borne the brunt of the fight (Slocum's), was, as it were, astride of the mountain. Of the other division (Smith's), the brigades of Brooks and Irwin were on the mountain, the reserve under Hancock being at the eastern base. Couch's division reported to me at 10 P. M. In October, 1862, when Mr. Lincoln visited the army, he came through Crampton's Gap; he told me that he was astonished to see and hear of what we had done there. He thanked me for it, and said that he had not understood it before. He was in all respects very kind and complimentary.--W. B. F. Early the next morning, Smith's division was sent into Pleasant Valley, west of the Blue Ridge, to begin the movement toward
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Gen. Edwin V. Sumner. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 2. Escort: D and K, 6th N. Y. Cav., Capts. Henry W. Lyon and Riley Johnson. Loss: Antietam, w, 1. first division, Maj.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson (mi w), Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell: 5th N. H., Col. Edward E. Cross; 7th N. Y., Capt. Chas. Brestel; 61st and 64th N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow (w), Lieut.-Col. Nelson A. Miles; 81st Pa., Maj.. Wolcott; 1st Mass., Capt. Josiah Porter; 1st N. J., Capt. William Hexamer; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward B. Williston. Artillery loss; Antietam, k, 1; w, 13; nm, 2 == 16. Second division, Maj.-Gen. William F. Smith. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, Col. Amasa Cobb: 6th Me., Col. Hiram Burnham; 43d N. Y., Maj. John Wilson; 49th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William Brisbane; 137th Pa., Col. Henry M. Bossert; 5th Wis., Col. Amasa Cobb. Brigade loss: Antietam, w, 6. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen.
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