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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
refuse; General Warren is very young, and is, besides, under a cloud about his movement on our left. General Sickles, people would say, is too much of a Bowery boy. Generals French, Newton, and Sykes are out of the question. General Humphreys has no influence strong enough to put him up. Any subordinate general would have to be of great note to be lifted thus high; there is no such one. I think they would not try a western general, after Pope's experience. The only one I can think of is Hancock, for a long while laid up by his Gettysburg wound, and not yet in the field. He belongs in this army, is popular, and has an excellent name. The New York Herald insists on General Pleasonton, which is an original idea. I heard of an officer who asserted that he had seen the order putting him in command; a rather unlikely assertion. Headquarters Army of Potomac December 12, 1863 I still think, and more strongly than ever, that no change will be made in our chief command; and those wh
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
about to do it. I have much confidence in him. April 13, 1864. We went to a review of Birney's Division near J. M. Bott's house. The two brigades are under H. Ward and Alex. Hays. About 5000 men were actually on the ground. Here saw General Hancock for the first time. He is a tall, soldierly man, with light-brown hair and a military heavy jaw; and has the massive features and the heavy folds round the eye that often mark a man of ability. Then the officers were asked to take a littlenervous and associating them with the fighting she had seen round the very house. Then there was a refreshment at Birney's Headquarters, where met Captain Briscoe (said to be the son of an Irish nobleman, etc., etc.); also Major Mitchell on General Hancock's Staff. The Russ was delighted with the politeness and pleased with the troops. Introduced to General Sheridan, the new Chief of Cavalry--a small, broad-shouldered, squat man, with black hair and a square head. He is of Irish parents, bu
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
g back. Tell him to stop them, sir!! roared Hancock in a voice of a trumpet. As he spoke, a crowthe woods and fell back into the Brock road. Hancock dashed among them. Halt here! halt here! F go in as soon as he can be put in position. Hancock's face changed. I knew it! he said vehementde's Corps) which had been sent to strengthen Hancock; the other brigade came later and was put on and knew too that he was late, very late. If Hancock could first be paralyzed, the day was safe fran says in his journal: 1.15 (about). Back to Hancock. He alone, in rear of Brock road; and there ight we made no impression; but, on the left, Hancock punished the enemy so fearfully that they, thely occupied the left and right centre, while Hancock, in the neighborhood of Todd's Tavern, covereral Meade, with three aides, rode back to General Hancock, and had a consultation with him. The dayled, I suppose, the taking of the Salient. Hancock was ordered to attack with his corps as soon [15 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
despite the late hour, General Meade ordered Hancock and Burnside to advance, so as to relieve Wary a flag of truce, to the enemy's lines. General Hancock will tell you where you can carry it out.dly toward the river, close to which we found Hancock, sitting on the grass and waiting for his Coreeth, so to speak, teeth with a black frame. Hancock got up that evening and joined the 18th Corpsl started with me. Do you know the way to General Hancock's? Yes, sir! In a few moments: This is ay after the Wilderness battles, when I heard Hancock say that Colonel Lyman had been useful to himfterwards. The Rebels got well alarmed about Hancock and sent reinforcements, recalling troops tharches of this Corps have given it the name of Hancock's cavalry. When a halt was ordered, one sold1864 There has been more fighting to-day. Hancock, at Reams' station, was destroying the railroough a part of our right, just at nightfall. Hancock hoped to retake the part of the line lost, wi[27 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
which was plenty early enough, as turned out. We rode down to General Hancock's about 9.30. He was camped not far from us, or had been, forith Mrs. P. and another lady, who came, on their return, as far as Hancock's Headquarters. The hospitable H. did thereat cause supper to be o questions, but puffed away at Grant's prime Havanas. Arrived at Hancock's and supper done, the General said to Porter: I think now is the have look at you, and you did not doge! It don't do to dodge with Hancock's Staff about; they would never forgive you. At length says the Geages, and so here we are back again, nobody having fought much but Hancock, who had a most mixed — up and really severe action, on the extrem in which the Rebels got rather the worst of it; but Grant ordered Hancock to withdraw during the night, or early in the morning, by which he General Davies', and, the last I heard of them, were pledging General Hancock in the national whiskey! . . . I omitted to mention a third or
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
kable for the departure of my dear General Humphreys to take command of the 2d Army Corps. For Hancock has got a leave of absence, and will doubtless be put to recruiting fresh troops, while it is hers and honored me by taking a piece of your plum cake. He was much tried by the noisy ways of Hancock's late Headquarters. They whistle of mornings, said the fidgety little General, and that Shaw,s about weather to his own wife he must be pretty hard up. I heard a characteristic anecdote of Hancock which made me laugh, as I knew his ways. It appears that he had issued stringent orders agains the troops had fallen on a large flock of sheep and were making short work of them. Away went Hancock, followed by the inevitable Morgan, Mitchell, and Parker. Very soon all these three were sent re he can get in, poor ba-ba is down and still. You blank blank all-sorts-of-bad-things, roars Hancock, how dare you? How dare you kill that sheep? Please, General, we didn't kill it, cried the te
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
nry Wager, 37, 68; difference with Meade, 35; Butler on, 193. Halsted, George Blight, 317. Hamlin, Hannibal, 76. Hampton, Wade, 252. Hamyl, —, 151. Hancock, Winfield Scott, 88, 90, 93, 96n, 107, 119, 121, 122, 129, 145, 148, 150; qualities to command, 60, 204; described, 82, 91, 120, 189; white shirt, 107, 184; at the Salient, 110; on Ricketts' division, 139; before Petersburg, 162, 168, 197, 216, 221, 224, 233, 234, 251; on Lyman, 177; on Shaw, 191; plundering, 288. Hancock's cavalry, 221. Hapgood, Charles Eager, 150. Hartranft, John Frederic, 323. Harvard Club, Washington, i. Harwood, Franklin, 201. Hatcher's Run, 292, 309, 329, 837. Ha. Platt, Edward Russell, 123. Pleasonton, Alfred, 75, 79, 80; Lyman with, 14; for command, 60. Pleasants, Henry, 195, 198. Plunder, demoralizing effect, 40; Hancock and, 288. Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, 193. Pontoon bridge, 130, 159. Po-Ny, 119. Pope, John, 60. Poplar Grove church, 234. Porter, David Dixon,