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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Margaret Strother Hancook or search for Margaret Strother Hancook in all documents.

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tember, they traveled by carriage, passing through Fredericksburg on the 11th, and reaching Baltimore on the 14th. They spent several days in Philadelphia, in order to consult the eminent Dr. Physick; and, after visiting New York, returned to Louisville, where they arrived on the 21st of October. During their absence their youngest child had died. Mrs. Johnston says: After much traveling and fatigue I am here again. My babe is in her place of rest, and my dear grandmother Mrs. Margaret Strother Hancook, who died about this time, at a very advanced age. living long enough to bless us once more-and die. Mr. Johnston devoted the autumn and winter to the care of his invalid wife, whom he tenderly nursed through an almost painless decline. In the spring they removed to Hayfield, about five miles from Louisville, the country-home of Mr. George Hancock, Mrs. Johnston's uncle. Mr. Hancock and his newly-wedded wife did all in their power to cheer these last sad hours. In this kind
thout seeing one; but after passing Corpus Christi they appeared in great numbers, fiercely rearing themselves up and offering battle to an approaching horse and rider. The Texans were gathering in hot haste at Point Isabel to defend their border, and their organization was rapidly effected. As General Johnston's extant letters give a clear and succinct account of the campaign and his connection with it, they may be allowed to tell their own story: Point Isabel, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancook: I suppose some time since you have stricken me from the roll of your friends, and, seemingly to yourself, with great justice; but things are not all that they seem. About the time I should have written to you I felt myself obliged, by the request of the Governor, who desired to give me rank next himself in the Texas quota of four regiments, to go by land to Corpus Christi. Once away from Galveston there was no opportunity of writing until I should reach this point, and since my arrival