Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Haney or search for Haney in all documents.

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est lasted until nearly dark. My Fifty-sixth and One Hundred and Fourth suffered dreadfully, lost the greater part of their officers and men, and were compelled to give way, carrying their wounded with them. It was then, in the language of Lieut. Haney, of the One Hundred and Fourth, that I (Lieut. Haney) and Lieut. Ashenfelder and others led Capt. Corcoran, Capt. Swatzlander, and Lieut. Hendric off the field. It was about half an hour before dark. We went down theNine-mile road, and alongLieut. Haney) and Lieut. Ashenfelder and others led Capt. Corcoran, Capt. Swatzlander, and Lieut. Hendric off the field. It was about half an hour before dark. We went down theNine-mile road, and along the Williamsburgh road. The fighting was nearly over. Our troops were all retiring. We saw the enemy not over seventy-five yards in our rear, and no troops between us and them. All of our forces were moving back, little regard being paid to brigade, regimental, or even company organization. Kearney's troops came, but did not stay long. Capt. Corcoran becoming continually weaker, we were compelled to carry him. Fully confirming the statements of my officers, I assert that I saw no runni
McGrath's battery were blown to pieces. I was standing close by at the time watching the splendid firing of the piece. God deliver me from ever again witnessing such a painful sight as those mangled and disfigured bodies presented. One lived for several moments, but died as we were lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first re
McGrath's battery were blown to pieces. I was standing close by at the time watching the splendid firing of the piece. God deliver me from ever again witnessing such a painful sight as those mangled and disfigured bodies presented. One lived for several moments, but died as we were lifting him into an ambulance. The men who were manning the gun at the time of the accident were as follows: Gough, first sponger and loader, killed; Flanagan, first sponger, killed; M. Kennedy, first shotman; Haney, first assistant sponger; Gorman, first train tackle man; Cunningham, first train tackle-man; Acaney, second train tackle-man; Thomas Gallaway, first handspike man; John Farrell, second handspike man; McKenny, powder-man; Cook, First Captain; Griffin, Second Captain; Captain McGrath, who stood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first re