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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for William H. Hannah or search for William H. Hannah in all documents.

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nly lift from the ground enormous weight, but could throw a cannon-ball or a maul farther than anyone else in New Salem. I heard him explain once how he was enabled thus to excel others. He did not attribute it to a greater proportion of physical strength, but contended that because of the unusual length of his arms the. ball or projectile had a greater swing and therefore acquired more force and momentum than in the hands of an average man. From this time forward Jack Armstrong, his wife Hannah, and all the other Armstrongs became his warm and trusted friends. None stood readier than they to rally to his support, none more willing to lend a helping hand. Lincoln appreciated their friendship and support, and in after years proved his gratitude by saving one member of the family from the gallows. The business done over Offut's counter gave his clerk frequent intervals of rest, so that, if so inclined, an abundance of time for study was always at his disposal. Lincoln had long
letter, Aug. 22, 1866, Ms. Before passing it may be well to listen to the humble tribute of old Hannah Armstrong, the defendant's mother: Lincoln had said to me, Hannah, your son will be cleared before sundown. I left the court-room, and they came and told me that my son was cleared and a free man. I went up to the court-house. ds with me; so did the judge and Lincoln; tears streamed down Lincoln's eyes ... .. After the trial I asked him what his fee would be; told him I was poor. Why, Hannah, he said, I sha'n't charge you a cent, and anything else I can do for you, will do it willingly and without charge. He afterwards wrote to me about a piece of land which certain men were trying to get from me, and said: Hannah, they can't get your land. Let them try it in the Circuit Court, and then you appeal it; bring it to the Supreme Court and I and Herndon will attend to it for nothing. From statement, Nov. 24, 1865. The last suit of any importance in which Lincoln was perso
ied that Jesus was the son of God as understood and maintained by the Christian Church. David Davis tells us this: The idea that Lincoln talked to a stranger about his religion or religious views, or made such speeches and remarks about it as are published, is to me absurd. I knew the man so well; he was the most reticent, secretive man I ever saw or expect to see. He had no faith, in the Christian sense of the term — had faith in laws, principles, causes and effects. Another man William H. Hannah. testifies as follows: Mr. Lincoln told me that he was a kind of immortalist; that he never could bring himself to believe in eternal punishment; that man lived but a little while here; and that if eternal punishment were man's doom, he should spend that little life in vigilant and ceaseless preparation by never-ending prayer. Another intimate friend I. W. Keys. furnishes this: In my intercourse with Mr. Lincoln I learned that he believed in a Creator of all things, who had neithe
no doubt he will make your situation very pleasant. Sincerely your son, A. Lincoln. On the 9th of the same month he writes his step-brother John D. Johnston: If the land can be sold so that I can get three hundred dollars to put to interest for mother I will not object if she does not. But before I will make a deed the money must be had, or secured beyond all doubt at ten per cent. She bade him good-bye, but was filled with a presentiment that she would never see him alive again. Hannah, he said, jovially, if they do kill me I shall never die again. Isaac Cogsdale, another New Salem pioneer, came, and to him Lincoln again admitted his love for the unfortunate Anne Rutledge. Cogsdale afterwards told me of this interview. It occurred late in the afternoon. Mr. Nicolay, the secretary, had gone home, and the throng of visitors had ceased for the day. Lincoln asked about all the early families of New Salem, calling up the peculiarities of each as he went over the list. Of t