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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
not so long as unwearied time shall count out the years to mortal man! There is a law which governs the compilation of history, gentlemen,—a law which is succinctly stated in this sentiment to which I am responding: The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicles of nations. Rome made the literature of her day; Carthage made none; Rome was the victorious power; Carthage was obliterated:—and yet, the figure of Hannibal stands out, luminously clear, from the misty background of those times, while Scipio Africanus is known to the ear only as a name, and the heroic defence of Carthage, when the women of that devoted city plaited their long tresses into bow-strings for the archers, and beat their jewels into arrow points, remains among the inspirations of history. Or, to take more modern instance, England made the literature of her time—Scotland made none; England conquered—Scotland was overcome; and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our cause in history. (search)
not so long as unwearied time shall count out the years to mortal man! There is a law which governs the compilation of history, gentlemen,—a law which is succinctly stated in this sentiment to which I am responding: The triumphs of might are transient—they pass and are forgotten—the sufferings of right are graven deepest on the chronicles of nations. Rome made the literature of her day; Carthage made none; Rome was the victorious power; Carthage was obliterated:—and yet, the figure of Hannibal stands out, luminously clear, from the misty background of those times, while Scipio Africanus is known to the ear only as a name, and the heroic defence of Carthage, when the women of that devoted city plaited their long tresses into bow-strings for the archers, and beat their jewels into arrow points, remains among the inspirations of history. Or, to take more modern instance, England made the literature of her time—Scotland made none; England conquered—Scotland was overcome; and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
al of his native State and of the Confederacy. History contains no finer specimen of the boldness, sagacity and skill with which a comparatively small army may be so handled as to cripple and baffle far larger and better appointed forces. Like Hannibal, Lee, for years, sustained the fortunes of his country by a series of splendid achievements; like Hannibal, he went down at last before the too mighty power of his foe; but, unlike the great Carthaginian, the splendor of his genius shone most brger and better appointed forces. Like Hannibal, Lee, for years, sustained the fortunes of his country by a series of splendid achievements; like Hannibal, he went down at last before the too mighty power of his foe; but, unlike the great Carthaginian, the splendor of his genius shone most brightly as years and difficulties increased, and the solid foundations of his military fame will rest more securely upon his last campaign, which ended in disaster, than upon any of his preceding victories.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
nly been begun. However gratifying the change which has been brought about in Northern sentiment in regard to the events of the war, we must not, we should not, allow the history of our side of this great struggle to be written by those who fought against us. Future generations should not learn of the motives, the sacrifices, the aims, the deeds of our Southern people, nor of the characters of their illustrious leaders only through the pens of their adversaries. What have not Carthage and Hannibal lost in the portraits—the only ones that remain to us—drawn by Roman historians? An example will illustrate what I mean. The other day I went over the field which will be ever memorable for the two great battles of Manassas, two of the most illustrious of Confederate victories. The quiet of twenty years of peace had settled upon that field. Few signs remained of the grand strifes in which the South drove back the invaders. I found upon that field two monuments, and but two. One of them