hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Frank Hanson or search for Frank Hanson in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

troyed, severe; Patrick Duggin, landsman, fracture of left leg, severe; John McPherson, seaman, scalp-wound and contusions, severe; John Dunn, coal-heaver, left eye destroyed, severe; Charles Steinbeck, ordinary seaman, fracture of skull, severe; Daniel McCarthy, landsman, compound fracture of scapula, severe; George W. Hersey, seaman, flesh-wound over hip, severe; Wm. H. Harrison, ordinary seaman, flesh wound in right arm, severe; Thomas Dennison, landsman, wounded over left eye, severe; Frank Hanson, seaman, contusion of both eyes, severe; Alvin A. Carter, ordinary seaman, fracture of right thigh, severe; George R. Leland, private marine, bolt driven into left thigh, severe. William McCaffrey, seaman, wound over right eye, slight; John Bryant, Armorer's Mate, scalp wound, slight; Roland M. Clark, ordinary seaman, flesh wound in left fore-arm, slight; William Brown, landsman, splinter-wounds in thigh and shoulder, slight; Charles Miner, landsman, contusion of shoulder, slight; Lewi
rd and Crufts found the enemy east of the ridge in heavy force and very strongly posted, skirmishing heavily with him until nightfall, when both divisions were withdrawn, ascertaining before leaving, that the enemy was in much stronger force than was supposed, and that, in consequence of late movements on our part, he had been obliged to order back to Dalton the reenforcements he had sent to relieve Polk in Alabama. Cleburne's division (one of those reported to have gone south) attacked Colonel Hanson's mounted infantry command at daylight on the morning of the twenty-sixth, and forced him to retire from the gap. Being convinced that the rebel army at Dalton largely outnumbered the strength of the four divisions I had opposed to it, and the movement against Johnston being a complete success insomuch as it caused the recalling of reenforcements sent to oppose General Sherman's expedition against Meridian, I concluded to withdraw my troops to the position they had occupied previous to t