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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Roger W. Hanson or search for Roger W. Hanson in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 4 document sections:

Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
regiment, Col. Ben Hardin Helm; Tennessee regiment, Maj. J. J. Cox. Artillery: Lyon's and Porter's batteries. First brigade, infantry, Col. Roger W. Hanson: Hanson's, Thompson's, Trabue's, Hunt's, Lewis' and Cofer's Kentucky regiments. Second brigade, infantry, Col. W. E. Baldwin: Fourteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel r identification of these commands, of which in the course of this history frequent mention will be made, a brief summary of their organization will be given. Hanson's regiment, the Second Kentucky, was organized at Camp Boone, July 21, 1861, with J. Morrison Hawes as colonel, a graduate of West Point, who was promoted brigadi Barclay, W. W. Bagby, Granville Utterback, W. Lee Harned, Samuel B. Crewdson, John G. Jones. The command designated as Cofer's regiment in the organization of Hanson's brigade was afterward consolidated with Lewis' regiment, and formed the Sixth regiment, of which Col. M. H. Cofer became second in command. Lyon's battery, t
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
s will be found.) About ten o'clock on the morning of the 13th, General Buckner says, the enemy made a vigorous attack on Hanson's position, but was repelled with heavy loss. The attack was subsequently renewed by three heavy regiments, but was agaist grievous must have been their suffering. General Buckner in his report speaks in terms of the highest praise of Colonel Hanson and his regiment, and of Graves' battery. Speaking of one point in the action of the 15th, an advance upon the righticipated, playing with destructive effect upon the enemy's left, while about the same time the Second Kentucky, under Colonel Hanson, charged in quick time as if upon parade, through an open field and under a destructive fire, without firing a gun, ution of the enemy's right dispersed through the woods and made their way, as was afterward learned, to Fort Henry. Colonel Hanson, in referring to the same incident in his report, says: In front of us was an open space which had formerly been occu
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
oops the Kentucky brigade again reunited General Hanson in command cavalry organizations brillia loss in Breckinridge's division death of General Hanson Breckinridge's report retreat from Murfidge's division was composed of five brigades: Hanson's, Preston's, Adams', Palmer's and Jackson's, t three commanders being natives of Kentucky. Hanson's brigade was as follows: First brigade, Col. nnessee was to recommend the promotion of Colonels Hanson, Hunt and Morgan to the rank of brigadierhick wood about five hundred yards in front of Hanson's position and extended to the river. Directit formed a little less than a right angle with Hanson's line, from which the center of the position second two hundred yards in rear. Pillow and Hanson formed the first line, Pillow on the right. Pade (commanded by Col. R. L. Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the secowith the army, the premature death of Brigadier-General Hanson, who received a mortal wound at the m
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
leet and the more dreadful storm of shot and shell, Hanson and his men were distinguished for bravery and steaofficial reports. It was late in the year when Colonel Hanson was exchanged. On the 13th of December, 1862, ame the tremendous battle of Murfreesboro, in which Hanson commanded the Kentucky brigade of Breckinridge's diys: In the assault that followed a brief cannonade, Hanson's left was thrown forward close to the river bank, Col. S. W. Price's brigade, and the charge made by Hanson's Sixth Kentucky was met by Price's Eighth Kentucky regiment, followed by Hanson and Pillow in successive strokes from right to left of Beatty's lines. * * * Beag to advance, but the bank bristled with bayonets. Hanson was mortally wounded and his brigade lost 400 men. in common with the army, the premature death of General Hanson, who received a mortal wound at the moment the ered to take command of the brigade of the late General Hanson, in Breckinridge's division. He commanded this