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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 109 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Jones, Col. Ellison Capers. Stevens's (or Jackson's) Brigade, Brig.-Gen. C. H. Stevens, Brig.-Gen. H. R. Jackson, Col. W. D. Mitchell: 1st Ga. (Confederate), Col. G. A. Smith; 25th Ga., Col. W. J. Winn, Maj. A. W. Smith, Capt. G. W. Holmes; 29th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. D. Mitchell, Maj. J. J. Owen, Capt. J. W. Turner; 30th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. S. Boynton, Maj. H. Hendrick; 66th Ga., Col. J. C. Nisbet, Capt. T. L. Langston; 1st Ga. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Maj. A. Shaaf, Capt. B. H. Hardee, Maj. A. Shaaf; 26th Ga. Battalion, Maj. J. W. Nisbet. Mercer's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. H. W. Mercer, Col. W. Barkuloo, Lieut.-Col. M. Rawls, Lieut.-Col. C. S. Guyton, Col. C. H. Olmstead: 1st Ga., Col. C. H. Olmstead, Maj. M. J. Ford; 54th Ga., Lieut.-Col. M. Rawls, Capt. T. W. Brantley; 57th Ga., Col. William Barkuloo, Lieut.-Col. C. S. Guyton; 63d Ga., Col. G. A. Gordon, Major W. F. Allen, Capt. E. J. Craven. Bate's division, Maj.-Gen. William B. Bate, Maj.-Gen. John C. Brown. Esc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
adily and bravely into the reentrant angles on Hardee's front. Schofield's right division, under Jule to the left and forward as we came on, till Hardee was at Dallas and Hood at New Hope Church. Ouminent knoll, and, with rapid discharges, took Hardee in reverse. That night, the 16th of June, Jow had Polk's corps, and Cheatham took Hood's. Hardee on the right and Stewart on his left, in lines the Confederates back, shattered and broken. Hardee would have resumed the assault, but an order fdrew back two corps into those outer works. Hardee, however, was destined to a special duty. Abo sleeping soldiers; they kept on eastward till Hardee's advance was within two miles of Decatur, and fortunately for Dodge, after the firing began Hardee's approaching lines nearing him had to cross sand build the required bridges. Hood had sent Hardee by rail, with perhaps half of his command, to . Hood now abandoned Atlanta, and united with Hardee in the vicinity of Jonesboro‘, near Love-joy's[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hood's second sortie at Atlanta. (search)
e rear of the Seventeenth Corps, lay the two divisions of General Dodge's corps, as if in waiting for the approach of General Hardee's troops who had been marching nearly all night around Blair's left flank, and were even then making painfully slow pated the space it then held, there would have been absolutely nothing but the hospital tents and the wagon trains to stop Hardee's command from falling unheralded directly upon the rear of the Fifteenth and Seventeenth corps in line. Upon what a sliimmediately, facing south-eastwardly, and galloped off toward Sweeny's division. He had hardly reached that command when Hardee's lines came tearing wildly through the woods with the yells of demons. As if by magic, Sweeny's division sprang into lio much cannot be said of the position of General Blair's left. It has not escaped attention that Hood's ability to throw Hardee's corps into the position where it struck General Dodge that noonday, was aided materially by the fact that General Sherm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
in Atlanta, which it could hold forever, and so win the campaign of which that place was the object. The passage of Peach Tree Creek may not have given an opportunity to attack; but there is no reason to think that the second and far most promising plan might not have been executed. In addition to the above claim, that he could have held Atlanta forever if he had not been relieved of command, General Johnston now says: I assert that had one of the other lieutenant-generals of the army (Hardee or Stewart) succeeded me Atlanta would have been held. It is not proposed to discuss this assertion, nor to refer to the claim made by General Johnston in his own behalf, farther than may be necessary to elucidate briefly its connection with the Georgia militia. At the time General Johnston was relieved the militia numbered about two thousand effectives, and the troops promised by Governor Brown were just beginning to assemble. Atlanta was not strongly fortified, and the Federal army on
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
establishing communication with, Stewart's and Hardee's corps. After having established communica till about 4 o'clock P. M., on account of General Hardee's failure to obey my specific instructionss; rations and ammunition had been issued, and Hardee's corps instructed to be in readiness to move to my headquarters the three corps commanders, Hardee, Stewart, and Cheatham, together with Major-Getake up the movement from his right as soon as Hardee succeeded in forcing back, or throwing into co flank of the enemy. I at once perceived that Hardee had not only failed to turn McPherson's left, hat formidable stream. Although the troops of Hardee fought, seemingly, with determination and spirunt of superiority of numbers in his front. Hardee bore off as trophies eight guns and thirteen sorps, was ordered to follow during the night. Hardee was to attack with the entire force early on tan should have occupied himself with attacking Hardee's intrenched position, instead of falling upon[25 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
in the attack upon that little fortress in February, 1863, and was sent to the army of Tennessee in time to take part in the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. It participated in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns, and in the spring of 1865, being consolidated with the First Georgia Confederate and the Twenty-fifth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth and Sixty-sixth Georgia regiments, it was engaged in the campaign of the Carolinas. The follow ing succeeding captains are recorded: (B) B. H. Hardee, (D) C. T. Berwick. The Second battalion Georgia infantry, sharpshooters: Maj. J. J. Cox, Asst. Quartermaster Thomas B. Gower; Capts. (A) R. H. Whiteley, (B) William H. Brown, (C) E. W. Ansley, (D) Samuel D. Oliver, (E) O. C. Myers. Adjt. C. P. Roberts was promoted to his position for gallantry. This gallant command participated in the Murfreesboro campaign, where it won great distinction, under the leadership of Major Cox; again in the Atlanta campaign, led by Major Whiteley, and in
Delaney A. Forrest, H. H. Claiborne, and E. S. Ruggles. Mr. Forrest is of Portsmouth, Va, and was a Lieutenant in the United States Navy. He returned from the East Indiea, in the Decotab, on the 7th or 8th of Novemeber, and was immediately arrested and sent to Fort Warren. Mr. Claiborne is a Louisianian. He was a midshipman on the Congress, and on her arrival in Boslon harbor he was arrested and sent to Fort Lafayette, and afterwards to Fort Warren. Mr. Ruggles is a Virginian, and was also a midshipman in the Federal Navy. He resigned in March last, at New York city, but was arrested and sent first to Fort Columbus, and to Fort Lafayette, and finally to Fort Warren. Another Release. The Savannah Republican says: Lieut. B. H. Hardee, who, it will be recollected, was captured with the Adaline, by the Federals, taken into Key West and subsequently to New York, arrived here Monday night by the Western route. He was discharged without conditions.