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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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h, by flag of truce, a formal demand for the surrender of the place, and on the following day received an answer from General Hardee, refusing to surrender. In the mean time, further reconnoissances from our left flank had demonstrated that it wasof the twenty-second rode into the city of Savannah, already occupied by our troops. I was very much disappointed that Hardee had escaped with his garrison, and had to content myself with the material fruits of victory without the cost of life whiand capturing near the foot of Argyle Island, a rebel despatch-boat called the Ida, having on board Colonel Clynch of General Hardee's staff, with despatches for gunboats above. The boat was unfortunately set on fire and burned. On the eleventh, ecember twenty-first, 1864: Moses White, Colonel, Thirty-seventh Tennessee infantry: J. H. W. Clinch, Colonel, Aid General Hardee; George P. Harrison, Colonel, militia; Thomas F. Wells, Lieutenant-Colonel, Georgia militia; A. D. Taylor, Captain, P
Charleston Railroad, and after destroying some miles of the road, marched to near the five-mile post, on the Augusta and Savannah Railroad. At this point, meeting with the enemy's strong line of defences behind swamps and artificial ponds, the corps was ordered to encamp for the night. During the afternoon a party of foragers, with some cavalry, succeeded in bringing to and capturing near the foot of Argyle Island, a rebel despatch-boat called the Ida, having on board Colonel Clynch of General Hardee's staff, with despatches for gunboats above. The boat was unfortunately set on fire and burned. On the eleventh, Geary's division was moved to the left, encountering some opposition from rebel pickets. They were, however, driven back into the main works, and our line was established from the Savannah River, near Williamson's plantation, in advance of Pipe Maker's Creek, across the Charleston Railroad to the Central Railroad, a few hundred yards from the junction of the two roads, co
, wood, etc. Marching on eastward, we struck the Savannah and Augusta road near the Savannah River and turned southward. On the eleventh of December I arrived before Savannah, and took position on the right of the Louisville road, relieving Mowers's, Leggett's, and G. A. Smith's divisions of the Fifteenth corps. This position was maintained, with more or less skirmishing, till the twenty-first instant, when my advance entered the city of Savannah. Several days before the evacuation by Hardee, I recommended an attack in front of my division. My total loss during the campaign in killed, wounded, missing, and deaths by disease is as follows: One commissioned officer wounded, two enlisted men killed, seven wounded, and thirty-seven missing. It is impossible to state accurately how much cotton was destroyed by my men, but it would probably amount to ten thousand bales. None was left in the country on our line of march. It is estimated that this division drew from the country
of December a foraging party of Carman's brigade, commanded by Captain Gildersleeve, One Hundred and Fiftieth New-York volunteers, captured the despatch steamer Ida, from the enemy, taking thirteen prisoners, among whom was Colonel Clynch, of General Hardee's staff. On account of the approach of rebel gunboats, Captain Gildersleeve burned the steamer, after removing the prisoners. On the twelfth, Colonel Hawley, commanding Third Wisconsin, on Argyle Island, took possession of the steamer Resrnpike. A forage party, under command of Captain Gildersleeve, One Hundred and Fiftieth New-York volunteers, this day captured the rebel despatch steamer Ida, on the Savannah River, taking thirteen prisoners, among whom was Colonel Clynch of General Hardee's staff. The steamer was burned by Captain Gildersleeve, he not being able to hold it on account of the rebel gunboats on the river. December 11.--The brigade in same position. Under orders from the Brigadier-General commanding the divis
lumn should take to the rear, whilst my forces moved on the front. To this end I brought round the iron-clad from Savannah River, which, with the Pawnee, Sonoma, Winona, and three mortar-schooners, were all that I could draw off from other places for the purpose. On the eighteenth, General Sherman came on board the flag-ship. Having fully invested Savannah on the land side, whilst the navy held every avenue by water, General Sherman sent a summons to surrender, which was declined by General Hardee on the ground that he held his two lines of defence, and was in communication with his superior authority. General Sherman therefore prepared to attack. His army was gradually drawing closer on Savannah River, and in order to cut off the escape of the rebel forces, he concluded it would be better to send a division to reinforce the troops of General Foster, up Broad River, and make a serious attack there in the direction of the railroad, whilst that on Beaulieu would be limited to the
ightly wounded. Enlisted men killed, thirteen; seriously wounded, fifty-three ; slightly, forty-eight. Eighth Georgia Regiment.--Enlisted men killed, four; wounded, eight. Ninth Georgia Regiment.--Wounded, Lieutenant J. A. Arnold and Lieutenant Hardee. Enlisted men, three killed, and twenty-eight wounded. Eleventh Georgia Regiment.--Wounded, Lieutenant and Adjutant J. F. Green, severely; Lieutenants M. F. Gudger and H. L. Parrish, slightly. Enlisted men killed, six; wounded, fifty, k P. M., entered the field of action, halted in a ravine for protection; remained till near eight o'clock P. M. Here our casualties were three (3) killed, thirty (30) wounded. Among the latter was Lieutenant J. A. Arnold, company C, and Lieutenant T. J. Hardee, company H. All the rest were enlisted men. Ten o'clock P. M., left the field in good order, remaining near the battle-field until the morning of the fourth instant; left in pursuit of the enemy, and proceeded down James River twelve
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
Mounger was followed by W. M. Jones, J. J. Webb and J. W. Arnold. Adj. A. O. Bacon was succeeded by John Jones. The commissary, J. C. Waddy, was followed by R. J. Cowart, and the quartermaster, J. W. Sutton, by E. P. Watkins. Captain Lane was followed by Gideon J. Norman; Jones by Wm. E. Cleghorn; Hillyer by J. W. Arnold; Webb by T. A. Hurt; Morris by R. P. Wellborn; Beck by S. A. Jemison and Hamp Doles; Hoge by G. G. Gordon and E. A. Sharpe; Mounger by R. A. Hardee, Corker (killed) and T. J. Hardee; Belt by R. V. Fulcher and Thomas Rought; King (died) by M. E. Sparks. Tenth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. Lafayette McLaws; Lieut.-Col. J. B. Weems; Maj. R. R. Hawes; Adjt. R. G. Strickland; Commissary G. H. Cheever; Quartermaster S. T. Neal. The captains were O. S. Kimbrough (A), C. H. Phinizy (B), Willis C. Holt (C), Henry L. Leon (D), Andrew J. McBride (E), Wm. F. Johnston (F), C. C. Kibbee (G), P. H. Loud (H), Y. L. Wotton (I), J. P. W. Read (K). This regiment served throughou