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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 218 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 163 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 145 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 127 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 117 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 113 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 109 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 102 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 93 1 Browse Search
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E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equall850) about the middle of August. The recruits were rendezvoused at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, under the command of Major Hardee, with orders to march to the frontier of Texas in October. General Johnston was troubled at being absent from his regierson Barracks. He was relieved, however, early in October, and proceeded to assume the command of his regiment. Major Hardee, an officer of tact, intelligence, and professional knowledge, had been in charge of the regiment, and had accomplishen, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While
, and to rouse that spirit of resistance which proved equal to the sublimest efforts. A month after Buckner's advance, the army at Bowling Green numbered only 12,000 men, 4,000 of whom were obtained not from recruits, but from the transfer of Hardee's army to that point. In his letter of October 17th to the adjutant-general, given hereafter, General Johnston concludes thus: I will use all means to increase my force, and spare no exertion to render it effective, at any point; but I caney need have no fear of losing it. On the 5th of January, General Johnston was reinforced by Floyd's brigade, which, with Maney's brigade, was sent him from Western Virginia. On January 9th he dispatched Colonel Liddell, of Louisiana, of General Hardee's staff, in whom he had great confidence, with a letter of introduction to the President. He says, Colonel Liddell is charged with a letter from me to the Secretary of War on a subject of vital importance to my command. He also commends him
23: Bowling Green. Confederate army in Kentucky.-Hardee's force, brought from Arkansas. situation in October. apKentucky a small force was recruiting. The transfer of Hardee's army from Arkansas to Kentucky has already been mentionelthough his military necessities compelled him to withdraw Hardee from Arkansas, General Johnston refused other applications to-night repair there and take command in person. General Hardee has already arrived there, and by to-night three-fifthad ordered forward all my available force to his support. Hardee's division and Terry's regiment have arrived. Here, and i men. This included about 6,000 under Buckner; 4,000 under Hardee, who had left 1,600 behind him, half of them sick; and som will elucidate its movements: first division. Major-General Hardee, commanding. Cavalry. Adams's regiment and Phifer'smmanders. Buckner has already been spoken of. But, though Hardee has been mentioned more than once, his relations to Genera
r with most of the infantry; at the same time ordering the cavalry to make demonstrations calculated to deceive Lane, Sturgis, and Fremont. The cavalry acted their part so well that the different columns of the enemy thought themselves threatened, and halted, while Price's main army had stolen several long marches upon them, and were making rapidly towards the south-west. At Springfield we learned that a different plan of campaign had been decided upon by the Confederate generals, and that Hardee's forces were withdrawn from the south-east. Pushing on towards Neosha, Price formed a junction there with McCulloch, and the Missouri Legislature, in full session, unanimously passed the Ordinance of Secession, amid salvos of artillery, and with the rapturous approval of representatives from every county in the State. As the combined forces of the enemy were still approaching in great numbers, and evidently bent on mischief, Price and McCulloch fell back to a strong position at Pinevi
-fires our presence was not known. Marching in three grand divisions, commanded respectively by Hardee, Major-General William J. Hardee was brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Second Cavalry, in the old serMajor-General William J. Hardee was brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Second Cavalry, in the old service, and for a long time commandant of cadets and instructor in artillery, cavalry, and infantry tactics, at West-Point, New-York. His famous work on Tactics is the approved text-book, both North ar under President Pierce, being made up of adaptations from the French and English manuals. General Hardee was for a long time on the Southern coast, superintending fortifications, but was appointed mand of Sidney Johnston, in Tennessee. At Shiloh our line of battle marched in three divisions, Hardee commanding the first; and by his rapid, skilful movements, contributing much to the rout of Grann them. It was now nearly eleven o'clock. Reports from different parts of the field represented Hardee and Polk as having driven the enemy pell-mell before them, capturing camp after camp, and immens
adventure among the pretty Quakeresses of London County, and had two listeners; Lieutenant-Colonel Dobbs was explaining formations and changes of front to Captain Johnstone, who, Scotchman-like, was disputing the authority of Dobbs's version of Hardee; while Lieutenant Moore entertained half a dozen round the fire with his reminiscences of the Emerald Isle. Said Major Jones, emptying his glass: Smithers, I entirely disagree with you. The campaign wasn't worth a cent till Lee took the helm,ame in there was no visible head at work, and those that were at work, the fathers of these blunders, had better keep themselves invisible still. Don't say any thing more, Major, said Johnstone, with a strong accent; I have a great respect for Hardee, for he is a good kind of Scotchman, from Glasgow, as my friend McGregor informs me, but there is no doubt about it that Beauregard was badly whipped at Manassas by that old Stirling man, McDowell. I knew some of the McDowells in Scotland, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., War preparations in the North. (search)
yed in marching in single line, by file, in changing direction, in forming column of fours from double line, etc., before their guns were put into their hands. Each regiment was treated as a separate camp with its own chain of sentinels, and the officers of the guard were constantly busy inspecting the sentinels on post and teaching guard and picket duty theoretically to the reliefs off duty. Schools were established in each regiment for field and staff as well as for company officers, and Hardee's Tactics was in the hands of everybody who could procure a copy. One of the proofs of the unprecedented scale of our war preparation is found in the fact that the supply of the authorized Tactics was soon exhausted, making it difficult to get the means of instruction in the company schools. The arriving regiments sometimes had their first taste of camp life under circumstances well calculated to dampen their ardor. The 4th Ohio, under Colonel Lorin Andrews, president of Kenyon College, c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ate Guard, though I had never then heard of a morning report, and did not know the right of a company from its left. Had Hardee or any other West Pointer been in command, he would have kept us in camp six months, drilling and disciplining us, gettinnot hard to find. General N. B. Pearce, commanding a brigade of Arkansas State troops, agreed to go along with them. Hardee, who was at Pitman's Ferry, Arkansas, within a few hundred yards of the Missouri line, and almost as near to Springfield he effort to repossess the State. On the same day, Price, McCulloch, and Pearce, relying upon the cooperation of both Hardee and Pillow, concentrated their forces at Cassville, within about fifty miles of Springfield. There Price was reinforced disperse Price's army; march to Little Rock and occupy the place; turn the Confederates under Polk, Pillow, Thompson, and Hardee, and compel them to fall back southward; push on to Memphis with his army and Foote's flotilla; capture that city; and th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
s where there was no need to go outside of prescribed military usage, or to assume responsibilities. But in Missouri all operations had to be initiated in the midst of upturned and revolutionary conditions and a rebellious people, where all laws were set at defiance. In addition to the bodies of armed men that swarmed over the State, a Confederate force of nearly 50,000 men was already on the Southern frontier: Pillow, with 12,000, advancing upon Cairo; Thompson, with 5000, upon Girardeau; Hardee, with 5000, upon Ironton; and Price, with an estimated force of 25,000, upon Lyon, at Springfield. Their movement was intended to overrun Missouri, and, supported by a friendly population of over a million, to seize upon St. Louis and make that city a center of operations for the invasion of the loyal States. To meet this advancing force I had 23,000 men of all arms. Of this only some 15,000 were available, the remainder being three-months men whose term of service was expiring. Gene
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
garrison there under General Alcorn and returned to Bowling Green. Rousseau's advance to Nolin and the arrival of large reinforcements there induced Johnston to move his headquarters from Columbus to Bowling Green, and on October 15th he sent Hardee with 1,200 men from that place against Ward at Greensburg, who, hearing of Hardee's approach, fell back with his recruits 20 miles to Campbellsville. no material change in this position of affairs in western Kentucky occurred while General ShHardee's approach, fell back with his recruits 20 miles to Campbellsville. no material change in this position of affairs in western Kentucky occurred while General Sherman remained in command, though there were several sharp skirmishes between bodies of Kentucky recruits and Confederate scouting parties in the lower Green River country. in the mean time the East Tennessee expedition was not progressing. Nelson, whose arbitrary temper had made him enemies among influential politicians, was sent to eastern Kentucky to superintend recruiting camps, and Brigadier-General George H. Thomas took command at camp Dick Robinson. Thomas was an ardent advocate of
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