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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

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2, the following Mississippi commands were included: In Hardee's division: Sixth regiment, Cleburne's brigade; Third batt Polk; the Second, under General Bragg; and the Third, General Hardee; the infantry reserve under General Breckinridge. Und battle was issued by General Johnston, according to which Hardee was to advance on the ridge road and form line of battle irey, advance up the two intersecting roads and then follow Hardee, forming a second line of battle. The First corps, except Monterey and go into action as practicable. On the 4th Hardee marched to Mickey's, and it was the skirmish on his front That night it rained in torrents. But as soon as possible Hardee advanced, and at 10 o'clock was in line of battle, thoughe river, and were led in person in a gallant charge by General Hardee. Major Mangum, with the Second Confederate, gallantly brigade took position on a hill and, under the eye of General Hardee, twice again repelled the enemy's efforts to seize the
th, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade, Thirty-third infantry. In Breckinrarmington and drive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; PolVan Dorn was received stating that at noon, after a conference with Hardee and Price, he had determined to return to his intrenchments, findin. On the 25th, after a consultation with General Beauregard, General Hardee, an officer whose fighting qualities and sound judgment have neday's delay might have proved fatal to the army. The letter of General Hardee, approved by General Beauregard, expresses the well-settled cone immediate command of the army of the Mississippi was given to General Hardee. On June 10th, Chalmers, promoted brigadier-general, had beeGrant and Rosecrans contented themselves with occupying Corinth. Hardee started for Chattanooga on July 21st with the army of the Mississip
eill, also the Twenty-seventh regiment, Col. T. M. Jones, but the latter was transferred to Patton Anderson's division of Hardee's corps, and given command of a brigade including his own and the Thirtieth and Thirty-seventh regiments. With Anderson'e division of Gen. J. M. Withers, Polks' corps, which was almost entirely made up of Alabamians and Mississippians. In Hardee's corps, the Fifth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col W. L. Sykes, and the Eighth, Col. J. C. Wilkinson, formed part of Jackson's brorning of December 31, 1862, Chalmers' brigade, at the right of Polk's line and well to the front, was the pivot on which Hardee and Polk wheeled to the right, driving before them, but not without desperate fighting, McCook's and part of Thomas' corpthe pieces were falling into the hands of the Twenty-ninth. Now, approaching noon, the hitherto unchecked progress of Hardee and Polk was arrested by Van Cleve's fresh division on the pike, and the Federals began to form a firm line to support th
lvaine, the Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth under Col. William F. Brantly, and the Thirty-fourth under Col. Samuel Benton. Hardee's corps included in Jackson's brigade, Walker's division, the Fifth Mississippi, Col. John Weir, and the Eighth, Col. Johirty-second, Col. William H. H. Tison, and Forty-fifth, Col. Aaron B. Hardcastle. Col. Melancthon Smith was in command of Hardee's artillery, in which were included the Mississippi batteries of Turner and Shannon. Stanford's battery was attached to ed, under command of Lieutenant Shaw, of Company G. Gen. M. P. Lowrey's brigade was conspicuous in the flank attack of Hardee's corps upon Sherman's army before Atlanta, July 22d. His men had not enjoyed rest or sleep for two days and nights; had's corps south to Jonesboro. In the battle there on the 31st of August, Gen. M. P. Lowrey commanded Cleburne's division, Hardee's corps, and Col. John Wier led his brigade. Lowrey's men swept everything from their front on the first day, and Sharp
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
led to Bowling Green, Ky., 2,000 sixty days men, raised in response to the call of Albert Sidney Johnston in the fall and winter of 1861. He was assigned by General Hardee to command of the fortifications at Bowling Green, December 20th, and one of Hardee's brigades was also for a time under his command. When the period of enliHardee's brigades was also for a time under his command. When the period of enlistment of his troops expired he returned to Mississippi and continued to serve his State and country in various positions, also resuming the practice of law. While defending a prisoner he became involved in a quarrel with the prosecuting attorney and was shot in the court house at Columbus, Miss., December 15, 1873. Brigadier-Gil the fight was over, and his men went into camp on the other side of Chickamauga creek. He shared the honors of his division and corps commanders, Cheatham and Hardee, and was mentioned by Bragg as distinguished for coolness, gallantry and successful conduct throughout the engagements and in the rear guard on the retreat. Goin