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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 426 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 312 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 272 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 241 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 97 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 84 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 84 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for W. J. Hardee or search for W. J. Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 5 document sections:

General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
ho, twenty-three years later, commanded the hostile armies on the plains of Manassas, in Virginia. Braxton Bragg and W. J. Hardee were of the same class. The head man of the next class (1839) was I. I. Stevens, who resigned from the army, and, exan Rangers, while out on a scout lost his camp guard of five men, surprised and killed, and later Captains Thornton and Hardee, of the dragoons, were met at Rancho Carricitos by a large cavalry force and some infantry under General Torrijon, who took captive or killed the entire party. Captains Thornton and Hardee and Lieutenant Kane were made prisoners. The other commissioned officer of the command, George T. Mason, of my class, refused to surrender; being a superior swordsman, he tried to nd Louisiana--under his authority from Washington for volunteers of infantry and cavalry. The capture of Thornton and Hardee created great excitement with the people at home. Fanning's massacre and the Alamo at San Antonio were remembered, and i
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 21: reorganization and rest for both armies. (search)
n was growing Burnside's three Grand divisions the campaign of the Rappahannock getting ready for Fredericksburg Longstreet occupies Fredericksburg the town called to surrender by General Sumner Exodus of the inhabitants under a threat to shell the town. Under an act not long before passed by the Confederate Congress authorizing the appointment of seven lieutenant-generals, the authorities at Richmond about this time sent commissions to Lieutenant-Generals Longstreet, Polk, Holmes, Hardee, E. K. Smith, Jackson, and Pemberton, and made appointments of a number of major-generals. Under these appointments General Lee organized the Army of Northern Virginia into corps substantially as it subsequently fought the battle of Fredericksburg. See organization of the army appended to account of the battle of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army rested along the lines between the Potomac and Winchester till late in October. On the 8th, General Stuart was ordered across to ride around
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 32: failure to follow success. (search)
ons with his other forces in Alabama and Mississippi. I said that under him I could cheerfully work in any position. Later on he offered the command to Lieutenant-General Hardee, who declined it. The suggestion of that name only served to increase his displeasure, and his severe rebuke. I recognized the authority of his high n to the corps left by General Polk, but changed his mind. General D. H. Hill was relieved of duty; after a time General Buckner took a leave of absence, and General Hardee relieved General Cheatham of command of the corps left to him by General Polk. About this time General Lee wrote me, alluding to the presence of the Presi the troops heard of the purpose of the President to assign him to command of Polk's corps, parts of the army were so near to mutiny that he concluded to call General Hardee to that command. A few days after he left us a severe season of rain set in, and our commander used the muddy roads to excuse his failure to execute the camp
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. (search)
r, let the detachment strike into Kentucky against the enemy's communications), something worth while could be effected. Presently I was called, with Lieutenant-General Hardee and Major-General Breckenridge, the other corps commanders, to learn his plans and receive his orders. He announced his purpose in general terms to sendtwelve thousand. We thus expose both to failure, and really take no chance to ourselves of great results. The only notice my plan received was a remark that General Hardee was pleased to make, I don't think that that is a bad idea of Longstreet's. I undertook to explain the danger of having such a long line under fire of the enBut I was assured that he would not disturb us. I repeated my ideas, but they did not even receive notice. It was not till I had repeated them, however, that General Hardee noticed me. Have you any maps that you can give or lend me? I shall need everything of the kind. Do you know any reliable people, living near and east of Kn
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 35: cut off from East and West. (search)
ral Bragg hall been relieved from command of the army at Dalton by Lieutenant-General W. J. Hardee, who declined, however, the part of permanent commander, to which,turn from Knoxville, General Sherman proposed to General Grant to strike at General Hardee and gain Rome and the line of the Oostenaula. He wrote,--Of course we must fight if Hardee gives us battle, but he will not. Longstreet is off and cannot do harm for a month. Lee, in Virginia, is occupied, and Hardee is alone. But GenerHardee is alone. But General Halleck was much concerned about the Confederate army in East Tennessee, the only strategic field then held by Southern troops. It was inconveniently near Kentucklure to follow has been explained. The summing up of the plans laid for General Hardee and Saltville is brief. Hardee was not disturbed. The ride towards SaltviHardee was not disturbed. The ride towards Saltville, made about the last of the month, was followed by General W. E. Jones and came to grief, as will be elsewhere explained. Upon relinquishing command of his ar