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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 426 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 312 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 272 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 241 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 97 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 84 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 84 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. J. Hardee or search for W. J. Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
pproved of the application, and sent it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referres. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with th, who also told the Lieutenant that it was General Hardee's determination to consolidate the two secthat he did not think he could hold his; while Hardee, who held the weakest part of the whole line, visited the extreme right, now under Lieutenant-General Hardee, and threatened by a heavy force, whnd, under the immediate direction of Lieutenant-General Hardee. By the road across the ridge at Ro been formed upon which to rally. Lieutenant-General Hardee, leaving Major-General Cleburne in cr, the enemy attempting no pursuit. Lieutenant-General Hardee's command, under his judicious managws and Vaught commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holl Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longe[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
through the regular channel. He heard from none of these except the one sent to General Stevenson. That officer approved of the application, and sent it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referred it to General Johnston. General Johnston's Adjutant, thinking the section had accompanied General Walker's divisiol Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was received from Colonel Wickliffe, who also told the Lieutenant that it was General Hardee's determination to consolidate the two sections, and promote Lieutenant Ritter to Captain. On the return of Lieutenant Stillwell from Meridian, Miss., he m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
e troops, and excited general enthusiasm. In the afternoon, the men were ordered to prepare entrenchments, which they did under the heavy fire of the enemy. To the chagrin of all, that very night at 10 o'clock an order came to fall back. This sudden change of intention was at that time a mystery, but in his official report General Johnston has stated the cause. General Hood had said that he could not hold his part of the line; General Polk that he did not think he could hold his; while Hardee, who held the weakest part of the whole line, was of the opinion that he could hold his. On the morning of the 20th the line of retreat was taken up across the Etowah river to Alatoona, and thence to New Hope Church, near Dallas. On the 25th the enemy moved up and charged the greater part of the line, but were repulsed with heavy loss at every point. The Third Maryland was not engaged till late in the evening, when it did terrible execution in the enemy's ranks, itself having but two me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
hat direction. On Wednesday, the 25th, I again visited the extreme right, now under Lieutenant-General Hardee, and threatened by a heavy force, while strong columns could be seen marching in that very heavy loss, by Major-General Cleburne's command, under the immediate direction of Lieutenant-General Hardee. By the road across the ridge at Rossville, far to our left, a route was opened to oue efforts of my staff, a nucleus of stragglers had been formed upon which to rally. Lieutenant-General Hardee, leaving Major-General Cleburne in command of the extreme right, moved toward the lefting the road for the retreat of Breckinridge's command, and orders were immediately sent to Generals Hardee and Breckinridge to retire their forces upon the depot at Chickamauga. Fortunately it was night, all being quiet, Bate retired in good order, the enemy attempting no pursuit. Lieutenant-General Hardee's command, under his judicious management, retired in good order and unmolested. As
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
We meet the first blasts of a winter campaign. Our tents are finally pitched in winter quarters on Harpeth's frozen banks, where Rosecrans so rudely disturbed us at Christmas eve. Murfreesboro follows and Vaught commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holding the pivot of the position, or rushing madly in that deadly charge, when Breckinridge, in grand array and stern devotion, dashed for those heights across Stone river, the Washington Artillery won Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
the movement which has so happily resulted in suitably decorating the grave of Lee. The Lee Memorial Association was formally organized October 24th, 1870, with the following officers: President—General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. Vice-Presidents—General J. E. Johnston, General J. A. Early, and Colonel W. H. Taylor, of Virginia; General G. T. Beauregard, Louisiana; General D. H. Hill, North Carolina; General Wade Hampton, South Carolina; General J. B. Gordon, Georgia; General W. J. Hardee, Alabama; General S. D. Lee, Mississippi; General R. S. Ewell, Tennessee; General J. B. Hood, Texas; General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; General J. S. Marmaduke, Missouri; General William Preston, Kentucky; General Tappan, Arkansas. Treasurer—C. M. Figgatt, Bank of Lexington. Secretary—Colonel C. A. Davidson, of Lexington, Virginia. The Association was incorporated by act of Assembly, January 14, 1871, and organized under its charter February 7, 1871. The Executive Committee (
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
Bragg's campaigns. Paper no. 2. By Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Miss. The Kentucky campaign. By the 21st of August, having made all needful preparations and inured his troops to the necessary and required discipline, General Bragg, with Hardee and Polk's corps, crossed the Tennessee river at Harrison's Ferry, nine miles above Chattanooga (we had but one transport, and consequently were several days crossing, which allowed the boys in gray an opportunity of bathing, the last they enjoyeWalthall's (just promoted) staff, who at this juncture was on sick leave in Virginia, and his brigade temporarily commanded by General Patton Anderson, recently deceased, we received instructions that by early dawn the next morning the left under Hardee (he and Polk being the two corps commanders) would begin the attack, conforming elbows to the right in their advance, the right of our brigade, resting on the Franklin turnpike, to be the pivot. The balance of the army to our right, being part o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The twenty-fourth South Carolina at the battle of Jonesboro. (search)
left rested on the railroad cut, which, at that point, was some eight or ten feet deep, the formation of the brigade being in one rank. Our line ran through a thick undergrowth and wood near the railroad, and was entirely without fortifications. The Second battalion of Georgia Sharp-shooters, Major Whitely, occupied the left of the brigade, resting on the railroad cut, and the Twenty-fourth came next, the Sixteenth South Carolina next, and the Forty-sixth Georgia on the right. Lieutenant-General Hardee directed me to make my position as strong as possible, and told me that he relied upon our brigade to hold the right of his line. The men climbed up the small trees, bent them over, and, using pocket-knives to cut across the trunks, succeeded in a half hour in making a first-rate abatis of little trees, interlaced thickly, and held by half their thickness to the stumps. Along my line I brought up rails and logs from the rear, and made a tolerable breastwork. As we were bent-back
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
s advanced the Army of the Cumberland, and succeeded in taking the rifle-pits at the base of the ridge, and rushing headlong to the crest of the ridge amid a storm of shot and shell, drove us in confusion from the field. Brigadier-General Alexander W. Reynolds's (this officer recently died in the service of the Khedive of Egypt) brigade of East Tennesseeans were the first to give way, and could not be rallied. (General Bragg's letter of February 8th, 1873.) At the time this brigade broke, Hardee was far down the plains in advance of his works, rapidly driving Sherman. It was with difficulty that he was extricated. The victory was as great to the enemy as the blow was severe to our cause. But a few days before, and we had the enemy at the point of starvation; either that or its alternative, a surrender. Now that he had been overwhelmingly reinforced, and by armies flush with recent victories, he had given us battle and won the day. It was a desperate alternative, and equally desp