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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 426 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 312 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 272 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 241 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 97 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 84 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 84 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. J. Hardee or search for W. J. Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Bond of heroism. (search)
berate way. When the officer in command had got them formed to suit him, he made them lie down, while he rode up and down the front as if waiting for orders. General Hardee came up to my brigade while we were firing on them, and said: Stop shooting at those men. It's murder. We stopped. Some time afterward I talked with McDowell about Hardee's order, and asked him what he thought of the situation. He said: It was not murder; it was war. Hardee was an officer of the regular army; he had fought under the flag, and I suppose he couldn't stand seeing it fired on when carried by such brave men. The way that brigade and its commander acted under fiHardee was an officer of the regular army; he had fought under the flag, and I suppose he couldn't stand seeing it fired on when carried by such brave men. The way that brigade and its commander acted under fire impressed me, and I have often wondered who the officer was. One of the officers present was able to tell to whom General Mills' tribute of bravery applied. He was General Carman. After a careful examination of the map, General Carman decided that the brigade was that of General John M. Loomis, composed of the Twenty-sixt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The prison experience of a Confederate soldier. (search)
was quite in contrast with the voyage down. The prisoners were furnished with rooms, and were allowed the privilege of the vessel, so to speak. We were guarded, of course, but by soldiers, not 100 day men. The Illinois touched at Hilton Head and took aboard the prisoners confined there. We were told that the Federal authorities considered that we had been punished enough, and that orders had been issued for our exchange at Charleston, S. C. On reaching the harbor we were informed that General Hardee, who had been in command at Charleston for some time, had just evacuated the city and was retreating before the advancing army of General Sherman. It was then said we would be exchanged at Wilmington, N. C. When we reached there, General Butler's army on transports, with a fleet of war vessels, were making preparations to storm Fort Fisher, and we were again disappointed. The Illinois was then ordered to Fort Monroe, with orders, we were told, to proceed up James River to the regular p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
alton, April 9, ‘64. Ordered to report to General Hardee's Corps, April 30, ‘64, 15th and 37th Tenn5, ‘62. Sept. 9, ‘62, ordered to report to General Hardee, Dec. 31, ‘62, 1st and 3d Florida Regimentoard at Shelbyville as Surgeon, transferred to Hardee's Corps. June 30, ‘63, 1st Georgia Regiment, sissippi Regiment. Exchanged at Vicksburg. Hardee, Charles, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secr1, ‘61. Chief Surgeon Breckenridge's Division, Hardee's Corps. Dec. 31, ‘62, ordered to relieve Surelieved at Dalton and ordered to report to General Hardee. July 31, ‘63, Senior Surgeon Polk's Briga. Bragg, Jan. 18, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Hardee. Dec. 31, ‘62, 44th Tennessee. Passed Boarnt, ordered to report to LieutenantGen-eral W. J. Hardee, by Secretary of War, Sept. 26, ‘63, to takwellen, April 25, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Hardee for duty with 16th Alabama. March, J. FrStout, April 9, ordered to report to Lieutenant-General Hardee, April 30, ‘64, 17th and 18th Texas.