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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 218 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 163 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 145 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 127 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 117 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 113 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 109 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 102 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 93 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for William J. Hardee or search for William J. Hardee in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
Battle of Shiloh Andrews' raid the Third infantry at South Mills the conscript act and State troops Georgians under Bragg and Kirby Smith naval affairs depredations in the coast region war Legislation Chickasaw Bayou and Murfreesboro. Georgia appears with credit at the famous battle of Shiloh April 6 and 7, 1862, by two commands, the Washington Light Artillery, Capt. Isadore P. Girardey, and the Mountain Dragoons, Capt. I. W. Avery; and among the general officers, by Maj.-Gen. William J. Hardee, commander of the Third corps, and Brig.-Gen. J. K. Jackson of Withers' division. Girardey's battery, attached to Jackson's brigade, took a conspicuous part in the struggle of both days, and suffered severe loss. In the Sunday fight, Lieut. J. J. Jacobus fell mortally wounded while gallantly commanding his section, and Lieut. C. Spaeth was seriously hurt. Gunner A. Roesel was killed, and Privates John Halbert, J. T. Nethercutt, Thomas J. Murphy and S. A. Ingalls were wounded.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
e up from the Eleventh battalion of infantry which had served on the Georgia coast in 1862. It was sent to the army of Tennessee in 1863; was in the campaigns of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, in the Atlanta campaign; then went to Savannah in Hardee's command. In the spring of 1865 it was consolidated with the Forty-sixth Georgia and Bonaud's battalion, and was engaged in the campaign of the Carolinas under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, surrendering with him near Goldsboro. Some of the successomos, (C) W. F. Scott, (D) T. P. Lloyd, (E) N. Miller, (F) O. Cromwell, (G) S. D. Nutt, (H) S. E. Glass, (I) T. H. Hodgkiss, (K) G. A. Cunningham. This regiment also was engaged in the campaign in defense of Savannah under the command of Lieut.-Gen. W. J. Hardee. The Fourth Georgia reserves had the following officers: Col. R. S. Taylor, Lieut.-Col. A. D. Candler, Maj. J. H. Bush, Adjt. W. T. Florence; Capts. (A) G. S. Peavy, (B) J. M. B. Carlton; (C) J. P. Hudson, (D) R. T. Bowie, (E) B. D. J
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
Bragg, with headquarters at Chattanooga, had to defend the line of the Tennessee river with an effective force of about 35,000 men, infantry and artillery, embraced in the corps commanded by Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, and the corps lately under Hardee, but to which Lieut.-Gen. D. H. Hill had just been assigned by President Davis. About 10,000 cavalry were under command of Gens. Joseph Wheeler and N. B. Forrest. The divisions of Polk's corps were commanded by Maj.-Gens. Benjamin F. Cheatham ag, the divisions of Jenkins and Law, four brigades, were sent against it to make a night attack. This was a failure, and the Federals remained in control up to within range of the guns on Lookout mountain. About the last of October, Longstreet, Hardee and Breckinridge were ordered to examine the situation on Lookout creek with a view to a general battle, but they decided that the difficulty of crossing the mountain prevented all hope of success. Our position was so faulty that we could not ac
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
of 1863. On November 3, 1863, General Bragg summoned Longstreet, Hardee and Breckinridge, then his infantry corps commanders, in consultatiLieut.-Col. Joseph T. Smith was mentioned for special gallantry. Hardee did for Bragg at Missionary Ridge what Thomas had done for Rosecrans at Chickamauga, and deserves just as much fame for it. Hardee's corps was the last to leave the field at Missionary Ridge, and Cleburne's diharge. So the fight raged for two hours and a half. At noon General Hardee sent word that the train was safe, and after consultation with f Tennessee, and turned over the command temporarily to Lieut.-Gen. William J. Hardee. In the address issued by the latter, he declared thatwn from Virginia and a like number from other sources, forming with Hardee and Longstreet a force of 100,000. Let this army take the offensivration and immediate mobility that are indispensable to save us. Hardee's force was increased after the battle of Missionary Ridge by Baldw
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
d the main body marched south of Calhoun while Hardee held back the advance of Thomas. On the 16th,nd prisoners, is reported by Foard as follows: Hardee's corps, 173 killed, 1,048 wounded; Hood's corcross the railroad north of Kenesaw mountain. Hardee's left was at Gilgal church, Bate's division omishers, put his artillery in position to take Hardee in reverse. Mercer's Georgia brigade, near Giough to cover the space vacated. At 1 o'clock Hardee began the change eastward and found that CheatShoup, was massed on the extreme right (east). Hardee was ordered to move with his corps during the ostile force at hand was in front of a part of Hardee's line. The prevailing impression was that Shn consultation, and finally determined to send Hardee's and Lee's corps, under Hardee, that night toHardee, that night to Jonesboro to drive the Federals across Flint river. This, I hoped, Hood says in his report of Februy between, in supporting distance of neither. Hardee did not have a strong position and had little [62 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
by the troops. During this visit Lieutenant-General Hardee was supplanted by Major-General Cheato Macon. Wheeler notified Generals Bragg and Hardee, General Beauregard at Tuscumbia, Gen. Howell b being concentrated at Macon on the 19th, General Hardee took command, and sent Wheeler up to Clint by the feint at Macon had managed to hold General Hardee there with some forces in their rear, and ing mainly on rice and finding it inadequate. Hardee saw that retreat was inevitable, and entertainthe latter. One of the precautions taken by Hardee to prevent Sherman from cutting off his retrea the following day received a refusal from General Hardee, who had about 15,000 troops, besides Geneas informed, to his great disappointment, that Hardee had escaped into South Carolina. A pontoon d from Hutchison's island across the Savannah, Hardee moved his army out in safety on the 21st, takia shore, disembarked, that his crew might join Hardee's column, and at 10 o'clock the ironclad was b[3 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
vannah. He moved in two columns, one threatening Augusta and the other Charleston. On the day that he entered Columbia, Hardee evacuated Charleston, retiring toward North Carolina. On February 22d, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was again called upon to take command of the army of Tennessee, transferred to the Carolinas, Hardee's command, Hoke's division, Hampton's cavalry, and such other forces as could be gathered to resist the advance of Sherman, who was reinforced by Schofield's corps at Wilmind thus saved Augusta from the fate of Atlanta and Columbia. At Averasboro Wheeler defeated a movement of the enemy upon Hardee's right flank, and covered the retreat when Hardee withdrew. In the engagement at Rivers' bridge, February 3d, the ThiHardee withdrew. In the engagement at Rivers' bridge, February 3d, the Thirty-second and Forty-seventh regiments, Fifth reserves and Earle's battery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Bacon, were engaged and suffered a loss of 97 killed, wounded and missing. Hoke's division took a prominent part in the battle of Bentonville, and
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
e siege of that city by Sherman's forces. Lieutenant-General Hardee, who was in command, did not expect to be after his long march from Atlanta to the sea. This, Hardee thought, would give time for the arrival of hoped —ing to thwart the latter's attempt to intercept General Hardee on his retreat from Savannah. On the last of tl skirmishing against vastly superior forces, until Hardee could evacuate Savannah, one of the neatest achieveon the march to Averasboro, covering the retreat of Hardee. Finally, at the battle of Bentonville, he particilater reported to General Mercer at Savannah in General Hardee's division; and in the siege of Savannah he coeans at his command. He commanded a division under Hardee at the battle of Averasboro, March 16, 1865, and walieved of active duty and sent to Savannah with General Hardee. On the retreat from Savannah he accompanied GGeneral Hardee, but was not afterward actively engaged. He was a gallant soldier, but physically unable to end