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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
ed to regard the whole affair as an excellent jest, and only the ordinary fortune of war. His gay laughter followed the narrative, and I remember the ardent light of the blue eyes looking out from the tangled curls of the brave boy. Well, Hardeman, you have had bad luck, I said, but get another horse and come on. I intend to; tell the General I'll soon be there. Yes. Good-bye. I shook the brave hand and rode on. I was never more to touch it. I have scarcely the heart to coe my narrative and relate the sequel. Something affects the throat as you think of these dead comrades whose hands you have clasped, whose voices you have heard. Some of the sunshine left the world when they went, and life grows dull. Poor Hardeman! But how can I call him poor? Rich, rather, beyond the wealth of kingdoms; for he died in the bloom of youth, before sorrow touched him, fighting for his native land. He did not succeed in procuring a horse, which is always difficult just
ed to regard the whole affair as an excellent jest, and only the ordinary fortune of war. His gay laughter followed the narrative, and I remember the ardent light of the blue eyes looking out from the tangled curls of the brave boy. Well, Hardeman, you have had bad luck, I said, but get another horse and come on. I intend to; tell the General I'll soon be there. Yes. Good-bye. I shook the brave hand and rode on. I was never more to touch it. I have scarcely the heart to coe my narrative and relate the sequel. Something affects the throat as you think of these dead comrades whose hands you have clasped, whose voices you have heard. Some of the sunshine left the world when they went, and life grows dull. Poor Hardeman! But how can I call him poor? Rich, rather, beyond the wealth of kingdoms; for he died in the bloom of youth, before sorrow touched him, fighting for his native land. He did not succeed in procuring a horse, which is always difficult just
spectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General, Commanding. Hdqrs. Little's Div., 1ST Corps, Army of the Miss., Bethel, Tenn., April 16, 1862. Major George Williamson, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: In obedience to the verbal instructions given me by the major-general commanding this corps, I have the honor to make the following report: This morning I was called upon by Maj. John H. Bills, of Bolivar Tenn., who, together with Dr. Jesse Barford and Thomas Boyle, of Hardeman, were arrested on Friday last by the Federals and taken to the headquarters of General Grant. On yesterday they were sent by General Grant with a note, which I saw, to General Halleck, who released them on parole, with a pass beyond their lines. Halleck's release and pass were indorsed on Grant's letter and dated yesterday. Bills says he was kept in Grant's quarters, furnished with food and lodgings by him; that he rode all through their camp, which is on the same ground occupied pri
ad escaped. We asked prisoner if he was the General. He replied, No; the General went to Wilmington this morning; that he was Captain Kelley, of the Engineer Corps, and on the staff of the General; that the officer who had escaped was Adjutant-General Hardeman, etc. Captain ordered him to dress himself without delay, and prepare to go with us. He (Captain Kelley) was terribly excited, and exclaimed: What, you take me, surrounded by my own troops! For God's sake, who are you! Up went the pister this they became quite sociable. The Colonel said he much regretted he could not invite me into the Fort; but said he: You have already seen more than I wish you had. Refreshments were brought on, and we had a very pleasant chat. Adjutant-General Hardeman, who was there, (I told him I had his blanket, and the circumstances connected with my taking it,) laughingly said that any body who could think of being cold at such a time, etc., deserved an admiral's commission. The Colonel said tha
position and strength. They found him in strong numbers and well intrenched. On Wednesday, the sixth, at daylight, skirmishers were again ordered to feel the enemy. They moved to the front, and found he had evacuated his position and withdrawn his forces across the river. About two o'clock P. M., we were ordered to march back to our old encampment. In closing this report, I cannot speak in terms too high of Colonel Cook and Lieutenant Winn, of the Fourth Georgia; Colonel Willis and Major Hardeman, of the Twelfth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Lumpkin, Forty-fourth Georgia; Colonel Mercer and Major Glover, Twenty-first Georgia. To their promptness and gallantry, and the able manner in which they were sustained by the officers and men of their commands, all of whom did their whole duty, I acknowledge my indebtedness. Attention is respectfully called to their reports, which you will find enclosed. To my staff, Captain Snead, assistant adjutant-general; Lieutenant Hawkins, aid-de-cam
from Thibodeaux about eight o'clock at night, with Hardeman's, Shannon's, and Herbert's regiments of my brigadthe water's edge, and there make an entrance. Colonel Hardeman, with the Fourth T. M. V., was to move up the e garrison within. hand to hand. Both Shannon and Hardeman were charged that they were expected to take the f of the plan of attack, and furnishing Shannon and Hardeman with guides, and the head of the column of the thrhich were to envelop the fort, I moved Shannon and Hardeman forward. Waiting a short time for Major Shannon trately contested on every part of the ground. Colonel Hardeman, with the Fourth Texas, being unable to controance. The columns of attack, of Shannon above and Hardeman below, were expected to move along under the leveeonal observation satisfies me that if the guide of Hardeman's regiment had not failed to conduct it to the forederal transport Huville was badly crippled by Colonel Hardeman's regiment and the rifle section of Semmes' ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
reported to be advancing on the road by Taliaferro's mills, and I sent Colonel Lane with his own (Twenty-eighth North Carolina) regiment and a section of Latham's battery to support the pickets and repel any small parties. At the same time Colonel Hardeman's Forty-fifth Georgia regiment was sent to repair the railroad at Ashcake, where it had been obstructed by the enemy the day before, and watch any approach of the enemy on that road. About the middle of the day the enemy opened fire from a ed that my brigade was engaged with an entire division in its front, but continued the contest in the hope that the cannonade would attract to me some reinforcements — taking the precaution, however, to keep Campbell's Seventh North Carolina and Hardeman's Forty-fifth Georgia in order to cover the retreat in case my expectation should not be realized. Finding I could remain no longer without being surrounded, and hearing of no reinforcements, and feeling assured from the firing that Lane had ma
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
f Southern soldiers. The gallant South Carolinians came first. Close on their rear came the Georgians; and we hear that Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana are on the way. To cap the climax, we hope soon to see Jefferson Davis on the hills of Richmond. But my main object in penning these lines was to speak briefly of the Georgians. At least three of the companies already arrived are commanded by Christians. Captain Doyall and Captain Beall are Baptists; Captain Smith is a Methodist; Captain Hardeman, though not, I believe a professor himself, is closely connected with a religious family. All of these gentlemen occupy high social positions in their several communities, and their companies comprise the best fighting, and some of the best praying materials of this nation. With a just cause and such defenders, can the contest in favor of the South be doubtful? This morning I had the pleasure of visiting Captain Beall's company, which is quartered in this city. A more substantial
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
ent to the men to attend meeting. He was one of the best officers in the army, one of the best friends I ever had, one of the most promising men I ever knew. He was killed while in command of Early's old brigade, at Bethesda Church, in June, 1864. His earnest request was, that if he was ever wounded he wanted the surgeon to tell him his true condition. Dr. Etheridge told him that he was mortally wounded. He said: I am no more afraid to die than I am to fight for my country. Lieutenant-Colonel Hardeman, Major Carson and Dr. Etheridge, were all professors of religion, and were always ready to do all they could for the cause of Christ. There were several captains and subordinate officers of whom I would like to speak if I had time. I am yours, etc., A. M. Marshall. From Rev. C. H. Dobbs, Presbyterian, chaplain Twelfth Mississippi. Kosciusko, Mississippi, March, 1867. Dear Brother: I regret exceedingly that about the close of the war I lost nearly every vestig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 18 (search)
ternoon, in extending our line to prevent the enemy from turning our right, I found myself with only two companies (Captains Hardeman's and Crosson's), opposed to a force numbering some four hundred men, the other four companies being several hundre effect of bringing the enemy within range of our guns, when the two pieces of Teel's battery and the small arms of Captains Hardeman's and Crosson's companies opened an effective fire upon them, before which they rapidly retreated with considerables were won and the enemy in full retreat before them. After carrying the battery their guns were turned upon them, Captains Hardeman and Walker manning those on the right. Lieutenant Raguet, of Reily's battery, being on the ground, I placed one guded the fortunes of the day, there were six companies of the Fourth regiment, T. M. V., under their respective captains (Hardeman, Crosson, Leseueur, Ford, Hampton, and Nunn). Besides these I saw Captains Shropshire, Killough, and McPhail, of the Fi
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