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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
he had in Parliament but one supporter of his views, a man named Biggar. He certainly had admirers elsewhere, for I remember having met a disciple of his, O'Connor by name, at a rout given by Mrs. Justin McCarthy. I asked this lady if her husband agreed with Mr. Parnell. She replied with warmth, Of course; we are all Home Rulers here. May 26. To Floral Hall concert, where heard Patti — and many others — a good concert. In the evening to Lord Houghton's, where made acquaintance of Augustus Hare, author of Memorials of a Quiet Life, etc., with Mrs. Proctor, Mrs. Singleton [Violet Fane], Dr. and Mrs. Schliemann, and others, among them Edmund Yates. Lord Houghton was most polite and attentive. Robert Browning was there. Whistler was of the party that evening. His hair was then quite black, and the curious white forelock which he wore combed high like a feather, together with his striking dress, made him one of the most conspicuous figures in the London of that day. Henry Irv
196, 206, 207, 208, 221, 235, 294, 302, 316, 339, 344, 375, 410. Letters to, II, 92, 362. Hall, Frances, II, 339, 362. Hall, H. M., II, 67, 294, 313, 324, 339. Hall, J. H., II, 67, 68, 98, 293. Hall, Julia W. H., I, 313. Hall, Prescott, I, 41. Hall, S. P., I, 340, 341, 343; II, 183. Hallowell, Mrs., Richard, II, 266. Hals, Franz, II, 10. Hampstead, II, 170. Handel, G. F., II, 351, 386. Handel and Haydn Society, I, 237, 290. Hapgood, Norman, II, 354. Hare, Augustus, II, 5. Harland, Henry, II, 165, 171, 172. Harland, Mrs., Henry, II, 167, 171, 172. Harrisburg, I, 386. Hart, Mayor, II, 162. Harte, Bret, II, 47. Hartington, S. C. Cavendish, honorary Marquis, II, 44. Harvard, I, 237, 297; II, 47, 48, 72, 183, 338, 374. Harvard Medical School, I, 72. Harvard Musical Concerts, I, 249. Havana, I, 126, 176. Haven, Gilbert, I, 365. Hawthorne, Nathaniel, I, 152; II, 325. Hawthorne, Mrs., Nathaniel, I, 79, 152. Haydn,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Constitution and the Constitution. (search)
sustain a contrast with freedom to be an outcast north of the Ohio? One more word from this officer and gentleman, bearing date July 28th: Seventeen hundred people have left Memphis within three days, rather than take the oath of allegiance. Leaving, they have sacrificed estate, wealth, luxury. War meant this for the South. Self was annihilated. The annihilation of self was in death grapple with the coronation of self-moral with material power. In the fascinating autobiography of Augustus Hare is narrated, Bayard mentioned a Southern lady, who, when the army of liberation approached, entrusted all her silver and jewels to her slaves, and they brought it back safely after the army had passed. In the trial fire of war the negro said: I obey where I revere. Could consent of the governed be more authentically certified? Under similar conditions would philanthropy in the Philippines receive a vote of confidence like this? Have seen, said John Randolph, the dissolution of many f