hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Charles G. Harker or search for Charles G. Harker in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

tenant-Colonel William H. Young. Ninety-seventh Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Milton Barnes. One Hundredth Illinois, Major Charles M. Hammond. Third brigade. Colonel Charles G. Harker. First Demi-Brigade, Colonel Emerson Opdyke. Second Demi-Brigade, Colonel Nathan H. Walworth. Twenty-second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Swanwick Artillery, Captain Hubert Dilger. Battery H, Fifth U. S. Artillery, Captain Francis L. Guenther. the former commanded by Brigadier-General G. D. Wagner, Colonel C. G. Harker, and Colonel F. T. Sherman; the latter, by Colonels Laiboldt, Miller, Wood, Walworth, and Opdyke. The demibrigade was an awkward invention of Granger's; permission, but before receiving a reply was ordered by you to move forward my regiment on the left of the Fifty-Eighth Indiana Volunteers. Report of Colonel Charles G. Harker, Third brigade. My right and Colonel Sherman's left interlocked, so to speak, as we approached the summit, and it was near this point that I saw the f
e decided to withdraw a part of the army to Strawberry Plains; and the question of supplies again coming up, it was determined to send the Fourth Corps to the south side of the French Broad to obtain subsistence, provided we could bridge the river so that men could get across the deep and icy stream without suffering. I agreed to undertake the construction of a bridge on condition that each division should send to the ford twenty-five wagons with which to make it. This being acceded to, Harker's brigade began the work next morning at a favorable point a few miles down the river. As my quota of wagons arrived, they were drawn into the stream one after another by the wheel team, six men in each wagon, and as they successively reached the other side of the channel the mules were unhitched, the pole of each wagon run under the hind axle of the one just in front, and the tail-boards used so as to span the slight space between them. The plan worked well as long as the material lasted,