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thus laid over a straight edge. The knives are fixed radially to a rotating disk, and shear past the straight-edge, severing the hairs with nearness to the skin determined by the set of the machine. Williams, 1832, has a frame with a series of parallel knife-edges presented upwardly. Over them is a block carrying an oblique knife which makes a shear cut upon the fixed knives in succession. Flint's fur-cutting knife, 1837, has an edge on one jaw and a cushion on the other. See also Harlow's patent for cutting bristles, 1868. 2. A mechanical contrivance for shaving the backs of peltry skins, to loosen the long, deeply rooted hairs, leaving the fine fur undisturbed. Fur-dress′ing. Fur, in its usual trade acceptation, is the short, fine hair of certain animals, growing thick on the skin and deprived of the long, coarse, protecting hairs. Furs are dressed by greasing and tramping, or by beating in a fulling-mill, the skin being softened by the absorption of grease a
4,982Smith et al.Nov. 8, 1864. 45,059MackNov. 15, 1864. 45,528SmithDec. 20, 1864. 49,023ZuckermanJuly 25, 1865. 52,847HarlowFeb. 27, 1866. 56,805SchwalbachJuly 31, 1866. 58,366AndrewsOct. 2, 1866. 60,433SingerDec. 11, 1866. 61,270SingerJan. 10. 105,123PepperJuly 5, 1870. 106,032CoonAug. 2, 1870. 106,249BennorAug. 9, 1870. 106,307BarnesAug. 16, 1870. 107,041HarlowSept. 6, 1870. 108,020HarperOct. 4, 1870. 109,828MacaulayDec. 6, 1870. 111,359MackJan. 31, 1871. 111,452HigginsJan. 31t al1871 Reissued.45,703.Davis1865116,216.Pratt1871 45,821.Emery1865116,885.Tally et al1871 46,226Emery1865117,774.Harlow1871 Reissued.52,293Kennedy1866118,417.Wyatt1871 53,777.Davis1866119,019Evans1871 Reissued.59,089.Smith1866122,852.Priest et al1872 59,103.Washburn et al1866123,508.Pratt1872 65,077.Harlow et al1867125,809.Grout1872 65,130.Spelman1867125,911.Smith et al1872 66,966.Jenkins1867135,293.Smith1873 69,541.Clark et al1867136,903.Harrison1873 70,861.Kingsley186
chitecture, and stands upon a generous lot of land at the corner of Broadway and Irving Street. It consists of a main building 70 by 62 feet, with wings 60 feet square. A description of the work of the students will be given elsewhere in this volume by Mr. Morse, its superintendent. The building and equipment cost about $100,000. The school, since its foundation, has been supported wholly by Mr. Rindge. The city Hall. The architects of the city hall were Messrs. Longfellow, Alden & Harlow. A suitable site was purchased by the city government, located on Main Street, and extending from Bigelow to Inman streets. Ground was broken February 1, 1889, and the corner-stone was laid, with appropriate ceremonies, on May 15, 1889, by Most Worshipful Henry Endicott, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons of Massachusetts. On December 9, 1890, the new city hall, finished and furnished, was formally transferred to the city, with exercises simple in character, in accordance with th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Seventh regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
and on August 31 arrived at Alexandria, on the way to join General Pope's forces in Virginia, uniting with them at Chain Bridge, Va., September 3. It took part in the movement against South Mountain and Antietam, and was actively engaged at Fredericksburg December 13, going afterwards into winter quarters near White Oak Church, and engaging with the rest of the army in the mud march of January, 1863. At Chancellorsville, as part of General Sedgwick's division, the regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Harlow, led the assault on Marye's Heights May 3, its colonel, Thomas Denton Johns, being in command of the storming column. It took part without loss at Gettysburg and marched with the Army of the Potomac to the Rapidan, engaging in November in the Mine Run campaign. Its winter quarters were at Brandy Station, Va., from whence an expedition was made to Robertson's River in February, 1864. In May, 1864, the regiment, as part of the 4th Brigade, General Getty's Division, 6th Corps, took
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 10 (search)
shore, three canoes full of Indians came to them, but would not come near, but rowed away up the river. They all went ashore where they had made choice of their plantation, and where they had a sermon delivered unto them by their preacher; and, after the sermon, the president's commission was read, with the laws to be observed and kept. George Popham, gent., Gentleman. was nominated president. Captain Raleigh Gilbert, James Davies, Richard Lymer, preacher, Captain Richard Davies, Captain Harlow, the same who brought away the savages at this time showed in London, from the river of Canada, were all sworn assistants; and so they returned back again. Aug. 20. All went to shore again, and there began to intrench and make a fort, and to build a storehouse. . . . You may please to understand how, whilst this business was thus followed here, soon after their first arrival, that [they] had despatched away Captain Robert Davies, in the Mary and John, to advertise of their safe ar
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Index. (search)
Ferdinando, 335. Gosnold (or Gosnoil), Bartholomew, 203-213, 222, 231, 232. Gourgues, Dominic de, 166. Granganimeo, 180. Wife of, 184. Greene, Henry, 296-301. Gregory XIII., Pope, 290, 328. Grenville (or Greenville), Sir Richard, 188, 190, 193. Guachoya, Cacique of, 135, 139. Gudrid, 14. Guernache, 151. H. Hackit, Thomas, 143. Hais, John de, 165. Hakluyt Society, Publications of, 18, 54, 120, 142, 202, 280. Hakluyt's voyages, 54, 98, 142, 169, 176. Harlow, Captain, 223. Hawkins, Captain, John, 161. Heckewelder, Reverend, John, 290. Henry VII., King (of England), 57, 58. Heriulf, 3, 6. Higginson, Reverend, Francis, 341-355. Hillard, G. S., 230. Hochelaga (now Montreal), 111. Holland, Lords States-General of, 303. Hopkins, Steven, 314, 334. Howe, George, 191. Huarco, 43. Hudson, Henry, and the New Netherlands, 279-308; last voyage of, 296-303. Hudson, John, 302. Hunt, Captain, 335. Robert, 231. Huyck, Jan, 305. I.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
e war. Carson, William, living at Middlebrook. Dunlap, John C., died in Georgia since the war. Gay, A. H., died prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1865. Gladwell, P. F., killed at Port Republic, 1862. Hanger, D. C., living at Spotswood. Harlow, Samuel, living in Missouri. Harlow, Nicholas, living at Rockbridge Baths. Hupp, B. F., killed at Cedar Creek, 1864. Kerr, R. Bruce, died in Georgia since the war. Lotts, Cyrus, killed at Spotsylvania Courthouse, 1864. McCutchan, JHarlow, Nicholas, living at Rockbridge Baths. Hupp, B. F., killed at Cedar Creek, 1864. Kerr, R. Bruce, died in Georgia since the war. Lotts, Cyrus, killed at Spotsylvania Courthouse, 1864. McCutchan, J. R., living at Middlebrook. McGuffin, Charles W., died since the war. McManamy, James, living at Middlebrook. McKemy, John C., killed at Buford's Station. Miller, David F., living at Moffett's Creek. Manley, Berry, living at Middlebrook. Payne, James, killed at Kernstown, 1862. Risk, John H., died in Indiana since the war. Runnels, Samuel H., died of disease, October 21, 1863. Smiley, Thomas M., living at Moffett's Creek. Snyder, James, living at Middlebrook. Sm
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry. Gore, James, discharged 1862, by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age. Goss, Ebenezer, enlisted October 10, 1864; exchanged with H. T. McCune to 39th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, November 23, 1864. Harlow, Samuel M. Herring, Henry A., detailed brigade teamster. Herring, John Henry. Hill, William H., wounded in hand, Second Manassas, August 30, 1862. Hall, Henry J., killed in battle at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Hall, William S., wounded in right shoulder, Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. Hall, Joseph M., enlisted March 28, 1862. Hall, E. B., honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harris, William, honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harlow, Lucian M., enlisted May 10, 1861. Johnson, W. W., died Chimborazo Hospital, typhoid fever, June 27, 1864. Johnston, William W., captured at Yorktown, April 26, 1862; exchanged August 5, 1862. Jones, B. C. Kendricks, J. M. Kite, William H.,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
nth Battalion. Virginia Cavalry. Gore, James, discharged 1862, by conscript act, over 35 years of age. Goss, Ebenezer, enlisted October 10, 1864; exchanged with H. T. McCune to Thirty-ninth Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, November 23, 1864. Harlow, Samuel M. Herring, Henry A., detailed brigade teamster. Herring, John Henry. Hill, William H., wounded in hand, Second Manassas, August 30, 1862. Hall, Henry J., killed in battle at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Hall, William S., wounded in right shoulder, Gaines Mill, June 27, 1862. Hall, Joseph M., enlisted March 28, 1862. Hall, E. B., honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harris, William, honorably discharged and detailed to other service. Harlow, Lucian M., enlisted May 10, 1861. Johnson, W. W., died Chimborazo Hospital, typhoid fever, June 27, 1864. Johnston, William W., captured at Yorktown, April 26, 1862; exchanged August 5, 1862. Jones, B. C. Kendricks, J. M. Kite, William H., enli
ble anxiety as to whether the woods were not running away into the farmyards, and a solemn inquest was taken to determine boundaries. Forty gentlemen took a walk . . . starting from Stratford bridge, called Bow; they glanced at West and East Ham, got to Ilford and Romford. . . . And then they saw landmark after landmark, and looked up the various meers, metes, bounds, and limits of the forest aforesaid, until every man must have earned any amount of dinner, and we hear of them at Epping and Harlow, and then among the marshes of the Lea at Waltham Abbey, the monks of which were, at one time, large proprietors and lords of manors in the district; and so on to a bridge called Lock bridge, now broken down, where now for passage is used Trajetus (a ferry), and from thence by the same river Lea (which bounded at once the forest and the county), to the fore-nominated bridge of Stratford Bow. —Cornhill Mag., March, 1864. near which he established a village of threescore and six dwellers. Af
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