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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Harmon or search for Harmon in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
,—there's a rustle among the leaves: Another,—the click of his gun is heard! A footstep,—is it the step of Cleaves, With Indian blood on his English sword? Steals Harmon Captain Harman, of Georgeana, now of York, was for many years the terror of the Eastern Indians. In one of his expeditions up the Kennebec River, at the headdgewock.’ He was killed in the attack of the English upon Norridgewock, in 1724.from Tacconock Has sent his runners to Norridgewock, With tidings that Moulton and Harmon of York Far up the river have come: They have left their boats, they have entered the wood, And filled the depths of the solitude With the sound of the ranger's d chapel-door. “Ha—Bomazeen! In God's name say, What mean these sounds of bloody fray?” Silent, the Indian points his hand To where across the echoing glen Sweep Harmon's dreaded ranger-band, And Moulton with his men. “Where are thy warriors, Bomazeen? Where are De Rouville Hertel de Rouville was an active and unspar