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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harper's Magazine, Nov., 1875, pp. 777-796; and afterwards reprinted in a volume entitled Barry Cornwall and some of his Friends, pp. 9, 47, 65, 101. Sumner was one of the guests, in 1859, at a dinner given by Mr. Procter to Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty mi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harper's Magazine, Nov., 1875, pp. 777-796; and afterwards reprinted in a volume entitled Barry Cornwall and some of his Friends, pp. 9, 47, 65, 101. Sumner was one of the guests, in 1859, at a dinner given by Mr. Procter to Hawthorne; at which were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that in a quarrel with the keeper of a turnpike gate he would quote Bacon! He invited me to go with him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty mi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ought of Madame de Stael and Fichte,— Donnez moi vos idees en dix mots. I did it; and he muses still. To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Sept. 13, 1843:— I have only a moment for a single line. The sun is bright; the day is fair. The Orpheus arrived this morning; so did Mackenzie. I have been to ask the latter to join me in dining with Longfellow, and now go to superintend the landing of the former. At the Inglises' last night we talked of you, and listened to beautiful music, which Miss Harper very much admired. To Professor Mittermaier. Boston, Sept. 15, 1848. my dear friend,—Your letter of Jan. 22 now lies open before me, and its date seems to rebuke me for my negligence in postponing, for so long a time, to let you know how sensible I am of your friendship and kindness. Your hospitality to poor Wheeler has awakened the liveliest gratitude among his numerous friends. You have doubtless heard of his lamented death at Leipsic, on the 13th June last. He was thus remove<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
abundance,—exercise, receiving and returning a few calls have consumed my hours and minutes. I have a noble horse, whose hoofs, resounding on the beach, fill me with daily exhilaration; and I do not fail in gentle companions in my exercise. Miss Harper is not fond enough of rapid motion. With the young Caroline Bayard (fair daughter of a more beautiful mother!) I ride this evening; and we shall devour the way with no mean amble or more energetic trot, but with a swift gallop. Miss Harper iMiss Harper is said to have drawn after her, in her journey of life, a large train of admirers. She is amiable and good, and I doubt not possesses a judgment as fine as her character; but she does not seem endowed with the magical grace which has introduced into her family three titles from the English peerage. I like her frankness and simplicity, and her sympathy with things high and true. I have been more pleased with the Middletons than I expected to be. The sons are bred thoroughly in the conventions