hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 34 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Harper or search for Harper in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

d uninjured, the rest killed, wounded and missing. The Washington Artillery, of New Orleans, was the last battery of the enemy to cause firing last evening, all the rest having previously become silent. It is supposed that want of ammunition was one cause of the slacking of the rebel fire in the latter part of the day. Our well served and numerous batteries, however, did the most towards silencing the enemy's batteries. In the afternoon the rebels were using the ammunition captured at Harper's Perry with more effect than their ammunition used in the morning. The enemy used on this engagement railroad iron, slugs and smooth stones as missiles of destruction. Among the officers who were reported killed yesterday was General Mansfield. Brigadier Generals Hartford and Max Weber were dangerously, and it is fared mortally wounded. Col. George L. Beal, of the Tenth Maine regiment, was wounded in the freshly part of both thighs, and Lieutenant Colonel Jas, Fillebrown, of the same