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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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15; praises him, 2.122; defection, 293. Hallett, Benjamin F. [1797-1862], edits Daily Advocate, 1.482; censures Mayor Lyman, 2.32, 43; on Lovejoy's death, 187. Hallowell, Morris L. [b. Aug. 14, 1809; d. June 16, 1881], 2.217. Hamilton, James [1786-1857], message concerning Lib., 1.241, visits New York, 2.1. Hammond, Ann Eliza, 1.317. Hancock, —, Dr. (of Liverpool), 1.349. Hancock, John, 2.29, 189. Harris, Andrew, persecutes Miss Crandall, 1.322, has G. indicted, 391. Harris, Beulah, 1.145. Harris, I. L., 1.248. Harris, John H., 1.70. Harris, Marcia, wife of Charles, 1.318. Harris, Mary, 1.318. Harris, Sarah, pupil of P. Crandall, 1.318; dismissal called for by town, 319. Harrison, William Henry [1773-1841], proslavery, 2.414; election opposed by Lib., 81, 333, 349, Webster preferred by G., 82; nominated for President, 434; carries away Whig abolitionists, 415, 428, 436, elected, 428. Hartford (Conn.), negro pew, 1.253. Harvey, Alexander, Rev., 2.371
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
d have fallen dead, making no stir or impression, and being consigned to a speedy oblivion, in which it remained until discovered and reprinted in 1840 by the American Anti-Slavery Society; but the writer had the disadvantage of publishing his work in an obscure town and a remote State, where he had no facilities for forcing it upon the attention of the country at large. Nor did he follow it up by dedicating his life to the cause. Lundy and his partner boarded with two Quaker ladies, Beulah Harris and sister, who lived at 135 Market Street, and their circle of acquaintances was limited to a few Quaker friends and some of the more intelligent colored people of the city. Among the former, John Needles, who subsequently attained a ripe age and lived to see slavery abolished, was one of the truest and most devoted; while among the latter were William Watkins (probably the Colored Baltimorean subsequently referred to), Jacob Greener, and his sons Richard W. and Jacob C. Greener. Ja