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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
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the army of the Shenandoah, had reached Manassas Junction, by rail, at midday. They were 6 miles in the rear of the battle, but officers of the general staff were at hand to guide and hurry them to the critical point of the pending contention, the Confederate left of the field. Just as that brigade entered the wood to the left of the Sudley road, a Federal bullet seriously wounded General Smith, and the command devolved upon Col. Arnold Elzey, a most efficient successor, who, guided by Captain Harris of the engineers, marched his brigade to Beauregard's extreme left and then, moving forward, met the Federal advance just coming into the open fields of the Chinn farm, and, aided by Beckham's Virginia battery, poured upon it a destructive fire which held it in check in the forest on the northward slopes toward the turnpike. Just then McDowell made another strenuous effort to turn the Confederate right by sending Keyes' brigade across the turnpike near the stone bridge, and thence south
The steady roar of the battle, which had been continuous since half past 4 of the morning, from the dawning of the day, now swelled in volume as Gordon met Hancock in the pine thickets embraced within the salient. The Federal left was soon thrust back and Gordon held the works on the east. Ewell hurried forward Ramseur's brigade, which had occupied the extreme left of the salient, in attack upon Hancock's right; while from Early's command, the Third corps, came the brigades of McGowan and Harris, following up the advance of Gordon and Ramseur. Lee, remaining where Gordon had left him, again rode forward to lead Harris' Mississippians, who, seeing this, in turn shouted: Lee to the rear, as they followed up Ramseur's attack on Hancock's right. These rapid combinations and charges of Lee's men soon drove Hancock outside the salient, and only left him in possession of the outer trenches at its apex and along its northern front. Two divisions, from the Sixth corps, were hurried forw
uite a body of his cavalry and learning that Sheridan's cavalry had turned from Charlottesville toward Lynchburg, determined to intercept and turn them back. Imboden's brigade, from the South Branch valley, reached Stauntonon the 10th, and on the 11th Rosser marched, at sunrise, with about 500 men, toward Lexington, encamping at Bell's, beyond Midway; marching at sunrise of the 12th, crossing the Blue ridge at Tye River gap, then by way of Massie's mills and Fleetwood and on by Hubbard's to Harris', three miles beyond Lovingston, where he went into camp at midnight. Sheridan had been frustrated in his attempt to get to the rear of Lee's army by finding that the bridge across the James, at Hardwicksville, was burned, and had turned down the river toward Scottsville, destroying property of all kinds as he went. On the 13th, Rosser took the old stage road leading toward Charlottesville as far as Rockfish river, where he turned, through byways, toward Scottsville on the James, which he
nant-colonel; Green, Charles J., major; Green, William J., lieutenant-colonel; Lyell, John W., lieutenant-colonel; Mayo, Robert M., major, colonel; Richardson, George W., colonel; Tayloe, Edward Poinsett, major. Forty-seventh Militia regiment: Harris, Benjamin J., major. Forty-eighth Infantry regiment: Campbell, James C., major; Campbell, John A., colonel; Dungan, Robert H., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Fans, Wilson, major; Garnett, Thomas S., lieutenantcol-onel, colonel; Stewart, D. Bosto S., lieutenant-colonel. Cohoon's Infantry battalion (see also Sixth battalion North Carolina Infantry): Cohoon, John T. P. C., lieutenant-colonel. French's Cavalry battalion (merged into Thirty-second regiment): Goggin, James M., major. Harris' Heavy Artillery battalion (disbanded June 10, 1862): Harris, N. C., lieutenant-colonel. Henry's regiment Reserves: Henry, P. M., colonel; Hobson, Joseph A., lieutenant-colonel; Reynolds, A. D., major. Jackson's Cavalry battalion (afterward
for others. His body, kindly cared for by General McClellan, was subsequently transferred with tokens of respect to the hands of his friends. Brigadier-General David Bullock Harris Brigadier-General David Bullock Harris, a distinguished military engineer, was born at Fredericks hall, Louisa county, Va., September 28, 1814.Brigadier-General David Bullock Harris, a distinguished military engineer, was born at Fredericks hall, Louisa county, Va., September 28, 1814. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1833, with promotion to brevet second lieutenant of First artillery, and a year later was called to the position of assistant professor of engineering at West Point. On August 31, 1835, he resigned from the army and entered the profession of civil engineering, for some trd wrote, My best and almost only assistant for planning the construction of batteries and making the selection of sites on which they were to be erected was Maj. D. B. Harris, the chief engineer of the department, on whom I placed the utmost reliance, and who always thoroughly understood and entered into my views. Early in May, G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
with a fury unsurpassed! On came the fleet, straight for the fort; Admiral Dahlgren's flag ship, the Monitor Montauk, Commander Fairfax, in the lead. It was followed by the new Ironsides, Captain Rowan; the Monitors, Catskill, Commander Rogers; Patapsco, Lieutenant-Commander Badger; Nantucket, Commander Beaumont and Weekawken, Commander Calhoun. There were, besides five gunboats, the Paul Jones, Commander Rhind; Ottowa, Commander Whiting; the Seneca, Commander Gibson; the Chippewa, Commander Harris, and the Wissahickon, Commander Davis. Swiftly and noiselessly approached, the white spray breaking from their sharp prows, their long dark hull lines scarcely showing above the water, and the coal black drum-like turrets glistening in the morning's sun. Approaching still nearer they formed the arc of a circle around Wagner, the nearest being about three hundred yards distant from it. With deliberate precision they halted and waited the word of command to sweep the embrasures of the fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General David Bullock Harris, C. S. A. (search)
General David Bullock Harris, C. S. A. A brief Sketch of his life and services. Brigadier-General David Bullock Harris, a descendant of an early settler and planter of Henrico, one of the eight original shires of the Colony of Virginia, was born at Frederick's Hall, Louisa county, Virginia, September 28, 1814. His fatheBrigadier-General David Bullock Harris, a descendant of an early settler and planter of Henrico, one of the eight original shires of the Colony of Virginia, was born at Frederick's Hall, Louisa county, Virginia, September 28, 1814. His father, Captain Frederick Harris, served in the war of 1812; was one of the founders of the old Louisa railroad and its first and continuous president until his death. This road became, subsequently, the Virginia Central railroad, and is now known in its extension as the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. David B. Harris, after having enDavid B. Harris, after having enjoyed the advantages of the classical schools of his native county, entered West Point Military Academy July 1, 1829, and was graduated thence July I, 1833, the seventh in his class of forty-three cadets, which included Generals John G. Barnard, George W. Cullum, Rufus Smith, Edmund Shriver, Alexander E. Shiras, Henry Dupont, Benja
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
t, Lt.-Gen. N. B., Lord Wolseley's estimate of, 325. Fulkerson, Col., Abe, 309. Fugitive slave law nullified, The, 382. Gaillard, Col. P. C., 172. Generals of the C. S. Army, Living, 34. Gordon, Gen. John B., 110, 400. Gorham, Hon., Geo. C., 205. Gregg's Texas Brigade, 71. Gregg, Fort, The Artillery Defenders of—A correction, 33. Graham, Col., Robt., 169. Greene, Death of Col., 182. Groner, Gen. V. D., 92. Hagood, Gen., Johnson, 181. Harcourt, Sir, Wm., 343. Harris, Gen. D. B., Life and Services of, 395. Heroine of Confederate Point, The, a contemporaneous account of the defence of Fort Fisher, Dec. 24-25, 1864, 301. Heth, Gen., Harry, 356; Sketch of, 389. Hiden, D. D., Rev. J. C., 307. Hill, Gen. A. P., unveiling of the statue of, at Richmond, with ceremonies and oration of Gen. J. A. Walker, 352; how killed and by whom, 349, 383; characteristics of, 384; his name last on the lips of Lee and Jackson. 385; presentation of statute of, to A. P. Hi