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ost his first wife in 1793, in the following year he married Abigail Harris, the daughter of Edward Harris, an old settler, who, with his wife, had emigrated from Newburyport, Massachusetts, and whohnston's earliest recollections was of his grandfather giving him money to buy a catechism. Edward Harris had been a Revolutionary soldier, and was appointed military storekeeper and postmaster at Wed religious convictions, and is evidently the production of an educated and thoughtful man. Edward Harris died in 1825, aged eighty-four years. He, at one time, owned a large body of land in Ohio, bsecond wife lived about twelve years after her marriage, and died, leaving him six children-John Harris, Lucius, Anna Maria, Clarissa, Albert Sidney, and Eliza. Anna Maria married Mr. James Byers, Clsylvania, and studied law with Hon. William T. Barry, afterward Postmaster-General. Orramel and Harris were thoroughly trained, under the eye of their eldest brother, by private tutors; the former co
reform me, which to a great extent was effectual, could have prompted his action. This kind of personal effort for the good of others is commonly given more grudgingly than advice, or even than money; but it does more good than either, because it evinces sympathy, and not merely benevolence. In explaining to the writer that he had divested himself of all claim to some land in which he was supposed to be interested, General Johnston wrote, December 20, 1858: My grandfather, Edward Harris, gave to my brother, J. H. Johnston, my sisters, and myself, 640 acres of land in Ohio. When I came of age I gave to Mr. Byers my interest in this land, and whatever else I inherited from my father, being a share in a small farm, a few negroes, and a homestead of small value. It was not much, but, whatever it was, I gave it all for the benefit of my sisters. My recollection is, that my father told me that his brothers united in this action. During the fall of 1826 Lieutenant Jo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
, as follows: Maine--Sweat; New York--Brooks, Chanler, Kalbfleisch, Keirnan, Pruyn, Townsend, Ward, Winfield, B. Wood, F. Wood; New Jersey--Perry, Steele; Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, Denison, Johnson, Miller, Randall, Styles, Strause; Maryland--Harris; Kentucky--Clay, Grider, Harding, Malloy, Wadsworth; Ohio--Bliss, Cox, Finck, Johnson, Long, Morris, Noble, O'Neill. Pendleton, C. A. White, J. W. White; Indiana--Cravens, Edgerton, Harrington, Holman, Law; Illinois--J. C. Allen, W. T. Allen; EdEdw. Harris; Wisconsin--Brown, Eldridge; Missouri--Hall, Scott.--56. Eight Democrats did not vote, namely, Lazear, Pennsylvania; Marcy, New Hampshire; McDowell and Voorhees, Indiana; Le Blond and McKinney, Ohio; Middleton and Rogers, New Jersey. Thus the nation, for the first time in its life, speaking through its representatives, declared its practical recognition of the great truth of the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal. This act was the full complement of the Procl
lliams, Master-at-Arms; John Troy, Captain Forecastle; Charles Anderson, ordinary seaman; Richard Ashley, colored boy, Wounded--Lieutenant Stephen A. McCarty, splinter-wound of ankle, slight; Ensign Clarence Rathbone, splinter-wound of knee, slight; Charles Hayden, yeoman, fracture of right leg, serious; John Burns, seaman, splinter-wound of arm and back, severe; James Ward, Quarter-Gunner, splinter-wound of back, slight; Frederick Stewart, officers' cook, shell-wound of head, severe; Edward Harris, seaman, splinter-wound of head, slight; John Bengsten, seaman, splinter-wound of wrist, slight; Anten Lewis, seaman, splinter-wound of knee, slight; Adam McCullock, seaman, splinter-wound of leg, slight; S. H. Eldridge, Quartermaster, splinter-wound of face; John Edwards, seaman, splinter-wound of face and arm, severe; John Lear, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of shoulder and hand; Francis Burns, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of back; R. O. Seaver, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
et my letter in time. It was on her own account chiefly that I asked her to stay back. At first I had a most strong desire to see her again, but there appeared to be very serious objections; and should we never meet in this life, I trust that she will in the end be satisfied it was for the best at least, if not most for her comfort. I enclosed in my last letter to her a draft of $50 from John Jay, made payable to her order. I have now another to send her, from my excellent old friend Edward Harris of Woonsocket, R. I., for $100, which I shall also make payable to her order. I am waiting the hour of my public murder with great composure of mind and cheerfulness, feeling the strong assurance that in no other possible way could I be used to so much advantage to the cause of God and of humanity, and that nothing that either I or all my family have sacrificed or suffered will be lost. The reflection that a wise and merciful, as well as just and holy God rules not only the affairs o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
dditional embarrassment arose, in the case of the Liberator, from the action of the Hovey Committee, who had hitherto paid for one hundred copies of the paper, for gratuitous circulation. They now stopped the appropriation, on the alleged ground . . . that the Liberator, for the countenance it has given to President Lincoln and his administration, has no more claim to be circulated by the Committee than any other Republican paper (Lib. 34: 210). The Draper Brothers of Hopedale, Mass., Edward Harris of Woonsocket, R. I., Samuel E. Sewall, and others voluntarily assumed the burden thus dropped by the Committee. From Henry Ward Beecher there came the following gay and characteristic note (Ms.): Brooklyn, Feb. 4, 1865. my dear Mr. Garrison: I have had the Liberator sent to me, free, for several years; on the principle, I presume, that I needed it. So long as I was in a state of nature, I consented to have a free gospel preached to me. But, as I have made up my mind, at length, t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
ent.Date. Harmon, William H., Corp.,7th Mass. Inf.,Marye's Heights, Va.,May 3, 1863. Harnett, Garrett, Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 18, 1864. Harridon, Elisha B.,22d Mass. Inf.,Gaines' Mill, Va.,June 27, 1862. Harrington, John, Sergt.,31st Mass. Inf.,Port Hudson, La.,May 25, 1863. Harrington, Patrick,33d Mass. Inf.,Dallas, Ga.,May 25, 1864. Harrington, Timothy,9th Mass. Inf,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Harris, Charles,20th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Harris, Edward,12th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Harris, Edwin H.,11th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Petersburg, Va.,June 21, 1864. Harris, George W., 1st Sergt.,1st Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 29, 1862. Harris, John, Corp.,16th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 29, 1862. Harris, John S., 1st Lieut.,11th Mass. Inf.,Chancellorsville, Va.,May 3, 1863. Harris, Sullivan B.,39th Mass. Inf.,Before Petersburg, Va.,June 23, 1864. Harrison, William H.,54th Mass. Inf.,Fort Wagner, S. C.,July 18, 1863. Harrol
ent.Date. Harmon, William H., Corp.,7th Mass. Inf.,Marye's Heights, Va.,May 3, 1863. Harnett, Garrett, Sergt.,12th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 18, 1864. Harridon, Elisha B.,22d Mass. Inf.,Gaines' Mill, Va.,June 27, 1862. Harrington, John, Sergt.,31st Mass. Inf.,Port Hudson, La.,May 25, 1863. Harrington, Patrick,33d Mass. Inf.,Dallas, Ga.,May 25, 1864. Harrington, Timothy,9th Mass. Inf,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Harris, Charles,20th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Harris, Edward,12th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. Harris, Edwin H.,11th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Petersburg, Va.,June 21, 1864. Harris, George W., 1st Sergt.,1st Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 29, 1862. Harris, John, Corp.,16th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 29, 1862. Harris, John S., 1st Lieut.,11th Mass. Inf.,Chancellorsville, Va.,May 3, 1863. Harris, Sullivan B.,39th Mass. Inf.,Before Petersburg, Va.,June 23, 1864. Harrison, William H.,54th Mass. Inf.,Fort Wagner, S. C.,July 18, 1863. Harrol
ett, Garrett, 371 Harney, Richard, 459 Harnscott, F., 522 Harradon, J. J., 522 Harridon, E. B., 371 Harrigan, Jeremiah, 492 Harriman, Mr., 26 Harrington, C. A., 459 Harrington, Daniel, 459 Harrington, John, 16th Mass. Inf., 459 Harrington, John, 31st Mass. Inf., 371 Harrington, Leonard, 460 Harrington, Patrick, 371 Harrington, T. J., 522 Harrington, Thomas, 460 Harrington, Timothy, 371 Harrington, William, 437 Harris, C. C., 492 Harris, Charles, 371 Harris, E. H., 371 Harris, Edward, 371 Harris, G. W., 371 Harris, J. D., 460 Harris, J. S., 97, 371 Harris, John, 371 Harris, Michael, 460 Harris, S. B., 371 Harrison, Hans, 522 Harrison, Samuel, 39 Harrison, W. H., Co. H, 54th Mass. Inf., 371 Harrison, W. H., Co. H, 54th Mass. Inf., 522 Harroll, John, 371 Hart, B. D., 522 Hart, Davis, 460 Hart, J. A., 460 Hart, J. W., 19 Hart, James, 460 Hart, John, 7th Mass. Inf., 371 Hart, John, 28th Mass. Inf., 522 Hart, T. B., 129, 371 Hart, W. A., 460 Hart, Wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
y, 1803, in the village of Washington, Mason county, Ky. He was the youngest son of Dr. Johnston, a physician, and one of the early settlers of that town. After the loss of his first wife, Dr. Johnston married Abigail Harris, the daughter of Edward Harris, who was an old citizen and a soldier of the war of the revolution. From this marriage sprang six children—three daughters and three sons—of whom Albert Sidney Johnston, the subject of this address, was the youngest son. General Johnston inhmade. Says his biographer: General Johnston had passed through the ordeal seemingly unhurt. His noble horse was shot in four places. His clothes were pierced by missiles. His boot soles were cut and torn by a minnie ball. At this moment Governor Harris (of Tennessee, now United States Senator) rode up elated with his own success, and the vindication of his Tennesseeans. In the meantime the retreating Federal soldiers kept up a fierce discharge of firearms, and delivered volley after volle
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