hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 46 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
private letter-book containing a large number of statements of prison experience by his fellow-prisoners. We can only extract one of these. Statement of Rev. George Harris, of Upperville, Virginia. On the morning of the 30th of August our quiet village was thrown into excitement by a report of the approach of Yankees. Fromhis business, when the following conversation ensued: Yankee. Are you the man of this house? Answer. I am. Yankee. What's yer name? Answer. My name is Harris; what is yours? Yankee. My name? Why my name is------. Then looking around, he espied some of the servants in the kitchen, a detached building, and awkwardour health, if not the lives of some of our party. But hitherto hath the Lord helped us, and in Him is our trust; we will not fear what man can do unto us. Mr. Harris, one the most devoted and useful ministers in Virginia, contracted disease at Fort Delaware, from which he was a great sufferer until, a few years after the war
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
as promptly, decidedly, and coolly as when piloting the vessel to a usual anchorage. Acting Master George Harris, in charge of the pivot gun, and Acting Master's mate, J. H. Hartshorn, in charge of efore they could be extracted, and the sabot of one had to be blown out and the gun reloaded. Mr. Harris, the master in charge of the pivotgun, attributes this serious fault, first, to the swelling ochem and make a minute survey from Wiley's Jump up to the forts. He detached Mr. Oltmanns and Mr. Harris, the first an assistant in the Coast Survey, the latter sent out by the superintendent (Mr. Arn the Owasco, being detailed by me for the purpose of protecting them. These two gentlemen, Messrs. Harris and Oltmanns, performed their duty most admirably: in three days they had surveyed and trianch other, their positions having been marked by the Coast Survey party, and Messrs. Oltmanns and Harris superintending personally that each one was acquainted with proper distance. Next to Lieutenant
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
is, J. W. Merriman, J. W. Page and H. E. Tinkham. Steamer Kineo. Lieutenant-Commander, Geo. M. Ransom; Acting-Masters, Oliver Colbourn and John Whitmore; Assistant Surgeon, O. S. Oberly; Second-Assistant Engineer, S. W. Cragg; Third-Assistant Engineers, C. F. Hollingsworth, C. J. McConnell and James Manghlin; Acting-Masters' Mates, John Bartol, W. H. Davis, G. A. Faunce and W. S. Keen. Steamer Katahdin. Commander, George H. Preble; Lieutenant, Nathaniel Green; Acting-Masters, George Harris and W. H. Pollup; Assistant Surgeon, S. Robinson; Second-Assistant Engineer, T. M. Dukehart; Third-Assistant Engineers, Wm. J. Reid, W. W. Heaton and John McIntyre; Acting-Masters' Mates, A. Hartshorn, Geo. Leonard, J. W. Thode and A. Whiting. Steamer Mississippi. Commander, Melancton Smith; Lieutenants, Thos. McK. Buchanan and George Dewey; Acting-Masters, C. T. Chase, F. E. Ellis, F. T. King and George Munday; Midshipmen, Albert S. Barker and E. T. Woodward; Surgeon, R. T. Macco
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
ommander, George H. Perkins; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, Wm. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. K. Bacon; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. S. Wheeler; Acting-Master and Pilot, Benj. Lancashier; Acting-Ensign, G. L. Jordan; Acting-Master's Mates, F. A. Case, M. F. Keeshan, Chas. Atkins, W. A. Osborn and M. J. Jones; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Wm. Rodgers; Acting-First-Assistant, E. P. Bartlett; Acting-Second-Assistant, J. M. Maratta; Acting-Third-Assistants, Alfred Wilkinson, A. H. Goff, George Harris, Henry Duckworth and Alexander Wiggins; Gunner, J. A. McDonald. Selma--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant, Arthur R. Yates; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Felix McCurley; Assistant Surgeon, Frederick Krecker; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. W. Clapp; Acting-Master and Pilot, J. H. Collins; Acting-Ensigns, L. R. Vance and W. A. DeWitt; Acting-Master's Mate, T. G. Gilmore; Engineers: Second-Assistants, John D. Ford and J. W. Patterson; Acting-Third-Assistants, H. W. Whiting and Edward Kenney. A
mpany G.--Killed, Private Thomas Snelling. Wounded, Privates Jas. Fox, shoulder, slight; Charles Ford, spent ball in stomach, slight; First Lieut. George Pemberton, spent ball in breast, slight. Company H.--Killed, none Wounded, Sergeant Jacob L. Wright, shot through the hand, slight; Privates Benj. L. Gowing, in foot, slight; Erhardt Burke, in wrist, slight; David Patterson, spent ball in ankle, slight; Burtis M. Gurd, wrist, slightly; Mather Neely, in head, recovering rapidly; George Harris, leg; Daniel B. Widell, shoulder; Lewis C. Clothier, hand, slight. Company I.--Killed, Color--Corporal Willard Hall, shot in the head. Wounded, Privates Henry C. Boyer, shot in cheek, slight; Grannison Reeder, in side by piece of shell. Company K.--Killed, none. Wounded, Privates Wm. Lenty, grape-shot in back of head, mortally; Hopkins Smith, spent ball in shoulder, slight. Recapitulation--Killed, staff one, corporals one, privates one. Wounded, Lieutenants one, sergean
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amherst College, (search)
Amherst College, An educational institution in Amherst, Mass., founded in 1821; incorporated in 1825. The funds for the construction of its buildings and for its endowments have been furnished by gifts of individuals, with the exception of $50,000 given by the State. The Christian men and women of Massachusetts have built it up and chiefly sustain it. The declared object of its founders was the education of young men for ministerial and missionary labor. In 1899 it had thirty-six professors and instructors, 380 students, buildings that cost over $400,000, and valuable art and scientific collections. The Rev. George Harris D. D., was elected its president in that year. Amidas, Philip
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harris, George, Lord -1829 (search)
Harris, George, Lord -1829 Military officer; born March 18, 1746; became captain in 1771, and came to America in 1775. He was in the skirmish at Lexington and was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill. In the battles of Long Island, Harlem Plains, and White Plains, and in every battle in which General Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, and Earl Cornwallis, in the North, participated, until late in 1778, he was an actor. Then he went on an expedition to the West Indies; served under Byron off Grenada in 1779; also, afterwards, in India, and in 1798 was made governor of Madras, and placed at the head of the army against Tippoo Sultan, capturing Seringapatam, for which service he received public thanks and promotion. In 1812 he was raised to the peerage. He died in Belmont, Kent, England, May 19, 1829.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
mous in English Unitarian annals. To mingle much with this denomination abroad was a novel experience for Mr. Garrison. On September 10, 1846, he wrote to his wife: Unitarianism is as odious in this country as infidelity is in ours; but, thus far, those who have most zealously espoused my mission have been the Unitarians. Ms. To S. J. May Mr. Garrison wrote from Boston on Dec. 19, 1846 (Ms.): I am under great obligations to Francis Bishop, William James, H. Solly, Philip Carpenter, George Harris, and other Unitarian clergymen, and have formed for them a strong personal friendship, which they appear heartily to reciprocate. By a letter just received from my dear friend Bishop, he informs me that, since I left, his wife has given birth to a daughter, whom they have named Caroline Garrison Bishop. This is an indication of their personal regard for me. James Martineau was absent from Liverpool when I was there, and I did not see him. I was told that he is considerably prejudiced a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
te the small gaps of the stupendous process and evolution, not very clearly defined or delimited, became accepted as God's method of creation. Belief in the unique sonship of Christ is a difficulty in the complete acceptance of evolution. George Harris of Andover Seminary and later President of Amherst College writes: There is no reason to suppose that any other man will be thus Godfilled. . . . We may well believe that he was one who transcended the human. Moral evolution, chapter XVI. Because Christ produced a new moral type, Harris feels that we need not deny either his nature miracles or his resurrection. Among the most thoroughgoing Christian evolutionists of our period may be mentioned President Hyde (1858-1917) of Bowdoin College and President John Bascom (1827-1911) of the University of Wisconsin. The latter, in his Evolution and religion or faith as a part of a complete cosmic system (1915), rejoices in the breadth of view and the boundless hope with which the doctrine
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
's Harfe, 584 Harber, G. B., 168 Harbinger, the, 437 Hardy, Arthur Sherburne, 86 Hardy, Thomas, 316 Harlan, Justice, 360 Harland, Henry, 91 Harmony of interests, the, 435 Harper, Chancellor, 338 Harper, Fletcher, 309 Harper, J. H., 547 n. Harper, W. R., 207, 468 Harper's Latin Dictionary, 463 Harper's magazine, 4, 5, 80, 81, 83, 114, 126, 150, 301, 304, 307-10, 311, 312, 313, 316 Harper's weekly, 325, 326, 334 Harrigan, E., 272, 278 Harriman, E. H., 167 Harris, George, 210 Harris, George W., 53 Harris, Joel Chandler, 12, 86, 89, 316, 615 Harris, W. T., 228, 230, 236-39, 247 n., 254, 265, 422, 477, 478 Harrisse, Henry, 184-85 Harrison, Gessner, 460, 477 Harrower, John, 389 Hart (Carey & Hart), 544 Hart H. and J., 582 Hart Tony, 272 Harte Bret, 4, 7, 31, 53, 53 n., 56, 59, 68, 73, 85, 86, 89, 99, 154, 267, 290, 307, 315, 581 Harvard, 35, 62, 86, 87, 96, 101, 117, 176, 177, 183, 186, 189, 199, 220, 231, 239, 240, 241, 245, 2
1 2