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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
nd placed the whole sum in advance at his disposal. Considerable money was contributed by individuals, both Southern and Union men, for the same purpose. Later in the day a dispatch was received from the committee which had been sent to Washington giving assurance that troops would be sent around and not through the city. This dispatch gave much comfort; nevertheless the preparations for the defense of the city continued. Another committee, consisting of Senator Anthony Kennedy and J. Morrison Harris, was sent to Washington. They telegraphed back that they had seen the President, members of the Cabinet and General Scott, and that orders would be sent to stop the passage of men through the city. Fort McHenry was at this time under command of Captain John C. Robinson, of the United States army. It was in a defenseless condition, and it was rumored that an attack would be made upon it by a mob on Saturday night. It was feared that if this was done the guns of the fort might be turn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
nd placed the whole sum in advance at his disposal. Considerable money was contributed by individuals, both Southern and Union men, for the same purpose. Later in the day a dispatch was received from the committee which had been sent to Washington giving assurance that troops would be sent around and not through the city. This dispatch gave much comfort; nevertheless the preparations for the defense of the city continued. Another committee, consisting of Senator Anthony Kennedy and J. Morrison Harris, was sent to Washington. They telegraphed back that they had seen the President, members of the Cabinet and General Scott, and that orders would be sent to stop the passage of men through the city. Fort McHenry was at this time under command of Captain John C. Robinson, of the United States army. It was in a defenseless condition, and it was rumored that an attack would be made upon it by a mob on Saturday night. It was feared that if this was done the guns of the fort might be turn
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1865., [Electronic resource], Meeting in Baltimore for the Benefit of Presbyterian ministers in the South. (search)
was called to the chair, who, upon assuming the position, stated briefly the object of the meeting. The Rev. Dr. Dickson, of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, presented a preamble, setting forth the deplorably desolated condition of the Southern churches and the suffering of their pastors, with resolutions looking to the taking up of a collection and to appoint a committee to obtain contributions in aid of their brethren in the South. In support of the resolutions, Dr. Dickson, Hon. J. Morrison Harris, and Rev. Dr. Backus, of the First Presbyterian Church, delivered short addresses, concurring fully in the language of the preamble and resolutions, and setting forth in eloquent language the destitute condition of pastors of the different churches in the South, and the broad field of charity thus opened to those desirous of contributing thereto. During the remarks of the speakers it was stated that there were some seven hundred ministers in the South, representing a membership of