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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 68 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Chapter 5: Wives and sweethearts At Antietam bridge A Union soldier after the battle, in September, 1862, occupied with different duties. The picket-guard The authorship of this production has occasioned more dispute than any other poem of the conflict. Very plausible details of its composition on August 2, 1861, were given by Lamar Fontaine. Joel Chandler Harris, who declared he would be glad to claim the poem as a specimen of Southern literature, concluded for five separate reasons that it was the production of Mrs. Ethelinda Beers. Mrs. Beers in a private letter to Mrs. Helen Kendrick Johnson said: the poor picket has had so many authentic claimants, and willing sponsors, that I sometimes question myself whether I did really write it that cool September morning, after reading the stereotyped all quiet, etc. , to which was added in small type a picket shot. the lines first appeared in Harper's Weekly for November 30, 1861. ‘All quiet along the Potomac,’ they sa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harris, Joel Chandler 1848- (search)
Harris, Joel Chandler 1848- Author; born in Eatonton, Ga., Dec. 8, 1848. Among his works are Uncle Remus; History of Georgia; Stories of Georgia, etc.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
y some ascribed to Thaddeus Oliver (1826-64). Davidson publishes Fontaine's letter claiming positively the authorship, but side by side with it is one from Joel Chandler Harris, who was at that time, according to the editor, planning an edition of Southern poems, and who after much deliberation expresses the opinion that Mrs. Beerditor of Harper's magazine. While he himself does not express an opinion, it is not difficult for the reader to be convinced by the reasoning submitted by Joel Chandler Harris. The mention of Harris suggests that in this volume he himself appears as the author of several poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything cHarris suggests that in this volume he himself appears as the author of several poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything could well be. Davidson has the credit too of publishing for the first time in this volume McCabe's Dreaming in the trenches and Christmas night of ‘62, and certain recent poems of Maurice Thompson and Sidney Lanier. He also has much to say of poems that do not relate to the war. In 1882 Francis F. Browne of Chicago carried out
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
his announcement kindled the ambition of young Harris, who was already familiar with the best literag country. It was in these early years that Harris laid the foundation for his future work. Theras known one-tenth part about the negro that Mr. Harris knows, and for those who hereafter shall wisonstruction period. A year before his death Harris founded Uncle Remus's magazine, which survivedn as a part of the present. As portrayed by Harris, Uncle Remus sums up the past and dimly hints at of an old negro, Uncle George Terrell, whom Harris had learned to know intimately on the Turner pWhat James Fenimore Cooper did for the Indian, Harris has in fact done for the negro. Just as ChingEnglish and in its most primitive state is, as Harris says, merely a confused and untranslatable mixleading short-story writers then living Joel Chandler Harris, George W. Cable, Mark Twain, Charles Eotable writers of the Southern dialect besides Harris, Page, and Cable, are Richard Malcolm Johnston[15 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
ons of life in the canebrakes of Arkansas; and it lingered over the Old South before the war as revealed by Johnston, and Harris, and Page. Never was movement launched with more impetus. No sooner had The luck of Roaring camp reached the East thaoduced this significant list of collections: Elsket, and other stories, Thomas Nelson Page; Balaam and his master, Joel Chandler Harris; Flute and violin, James Lane Allen; Otto the Knight, Octave Thanet (Alice French); Main-Travelled Roads, Hamlin Gs its fidelity to local conditions. The Century published Page's Marse Chan, a story entirely in negro dialect. Joel Chandler Harris See also Book III, Chap. V. contributed his inimitable Uncle Remus studies of negro folklore and added to themich appeared the same year as In the Tennessee Mountains, deals with the Craddock region and people but with surer hand. Harris was himself a native of Georgia hills, though he was by no means a cracker, and he spoke with the sympathy and the knowle
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
more to the author's illustrations than to the text). For this condition publishers may be somewhat responsible, as they can sufficiently supply the market with uncopyrighted European material for which no royalties need be paid. Less likely to have been discouraged by unfair foreign competition, and certainly in themselves more indigenous, are stories which endow animals with human motives and speech. A local counterpart of European folk-lore is the lore of Uncle Remus, created by Joel Chandler Harris. See also Book III, Chap. V. He was far more successful than Hawthorne in the setting he gave these tales, which, like the Greek myths, are the common property of a race; Uncle Remus himself is a fine characterization, well-observed, humorous, and full of reverent kindliness. The class of juvenile poetry furnished no writer distinguished by any body of work, but an anthology of high order could be compiled. First in time and perhaps in merit would come a one-poem writer, Cleme
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Benjamin Buel, 260 Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 150, 167 Halpine, Charles Graham, 155, 279, 284, 286 Hamerik, Asger, 336 Hamilton, Alexander, 74, 84, 180, 181, 184 Hamilton, Gail, 402 Hamilton, Sir, William, 219 Hammett, Samuel A., 155 Hammond, Charles, 184 Hampton Institute, 324 Hannibal, 128 Hans Brinker, 402 Harbinger, the, 166 Harlan, Jas., 270 Harned, Thomas B., 265 n., 266 n., 272, 272 n. Harper's magazine, 168, 169, 303, 371, 373, 381 Harris, G. W., 153 Harris, J. C., 303, 347-350, 352 n., 353, 354-360, 365, 379, 388, 389, 408 Harrson, Benjamin, 93 n., 191 Harrson, J. A., 61 n., 65 n. Harrisse, H., 128 Harte, Bret, 242, 281, 284, 286, 360, 362, 363, 365, 377-381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 387, 388, 389, 391, 394 Harvard, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 33, 34, 35, 36, 77, 109, 110, 111, 115, 117, 123, 124, 126, 132, 133, 149, 207, 209, 226, 227, 246, 255, 316, 320 Haunted Palace, the, 65, 66, 67 d'haussonville, Count, 127, 129 Hawthorne (Hathorne
was the magazines and publishing-houses of New York and Boston that gave the Southern authors their chief stimulus and support. It was one of the happy proofs of the solidarity of the new nation. The romance of the Spanish and French civilization of New Orleans, as revealed in Mr. Cable's fascinating Old Creole days, was recognized, not as something merely provincial in its significance, but as contributing to the infinitely variegated pattern of our national life. Irwin Russell, Joel Chandler Harris, and Thomas Nelson Page portrayed in verse and prose the humorous, pathetic, unique traits of the Southern negro, a type hitherto chiefly sketched in caricature or by strangers. Page, Hopkinson Smith, Grace King, and a score of other artists began to draw affectionate pictures of the vanished Southern mansion of plantation days, when all the women were beautiful and all the men were brave, when the very horses were more spirited and the dogs lazier and the honeysuckles sweeter and t
Fugitive slave act, 144 Fuller, Margaret, 119, 140-41 Garrison, W. L., 89-90, 137, 159, 208, 217-18 Gettysburg address, Lincoln 230-231 Gilded age, the, Clemens 237-238 God glorified in man's Dependence, Edwards 50 Gold Bug, the, Poe 193 Gookin, Daniel, 38 Greeley, Horace, 217-18 Greenslet, Ferris, 169 Hale, E. E., 224 Half-century of conflict, a, Parkman 185 Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 107 Hamilton, Alexander, 76-77 Hanging of the Crane, the, Longfellow 156 Harris, J. C., 246 Harte, Bret, 240-42 Harvard, John, 16 Harvard College, 62 Haunted Palace, the, Poe 192 Hawthorne, Nathaniel, in 1826, 89; opinion of Bryant, 105; opinion of Transcendentalism, 143; life and writings, 144-52; typically American, 265 Hayne, Paul, 225 Hazard of New Fortunes, a, Howells 251 Hearn, Lafcadio, 248 Hecker, Father, 141 Henry, Patrick, 72, 209 Herons of Elmwood, the, Longfellow 156 Hiawatha, Longfellow 155 Higginson, T. W., 142, 262 Holmes, O. W.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
worn chivalry in the South, an account of a meeting with G. W. Cable and Joel Chandler Harris in New Orleans, and miscellaneous yarns and information; but it is of diddock, Johnston, Page, For these writers see Book III, Chap. VI. and Joel Chandler Harris, See Book III, Chap. V.—though they all wrote novels of merit,—becau painted the amiable colours of antebellum plantation life— Cable, Page, Joel Chandler Harris; or from California, from writers who tried to catch the charm of old Sp, Kipling, Thomas Hardy, Andrew Lang, Conan Doyle, William Dean Howells, Joel Chandler Harris, F. Marion Crawford, Edward Everett Hale, George W. Cable, and others off divine accident that one wishes might happen oftener. It appears that Joel Chandler Harris did not himself know, when he wrote them, that his Br'er Rabbit and Br'er understanding misses the humouresque which they had to the Indian. Coming to Harris as they did through the modified primitiveness of the negro, their essential fr<
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