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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mormons, (search)
the plates in hieroglyphics of the reformed Egyptian, then not known on the earth. From these plates, with the aid of the Urim and Thummim, Smith, sitting behind a blanket-screen to hide the plates from eyes profane, read the Book of Mormon (or Golden Bible, as he sometimes called it) to Oliver Cowdery, who wrote it down as Smith read it. It was printed in 1830 in a volume of several hundred pages. Appended to the narrative is a declaration signed by Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris in these words: We declare, with words of soberness, that an angel of God came down from heaven, and he brought and laid before our eyes, that we beheld and saw the plates and the engravings thereon. These the Mormons call the Three witnesses. Several years afterwards these men quarrelled with Smith, renounced Mormonism, and solemnly declared that their testimony was false. The Book of Mormon is a collection of sixteen distinct books, professing to be written at different periods b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nashville, (search)
Fort Donelson to the Nationals. There was panic everywhere. Gen. A. S. Johnston, at Bowling Green, ordered the troops there to fly to Nashville, for General Mitchel, of Buell's army, was pressing on them. They did so, after destroying property valued at $500,000. They were followed by the Army of the Ohio. At the same time National gunboats were ascending the Cumberland River to co-operate with the troops. The Confederates of Nashville were fearfully excited. The governor of Tennessee (Harris) rode through the streets, and with his associates gathered as many papers as possible at the capitol as concerned themselves and fled by railway to Memphis. The officers of banks bore away their specie. Citizens, with their most valuable portable possessions, fled by railway to Decatur and Chattanooga. The public stores were thrown wide open, and everybody was allowed to carry away provisions and clothing. Johnston and his troops passed rapidly through the city, southward, and Nashville
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ns, he dug up the same, and found them covered with small, mystic characters of the Reformed Egyptian style—as Professor Talmage hints. It was a time when people were still talking of the Rosetta Stone, when travelling showmen were exhibiting mummies, and when the Egyptian style was affecting the public taste, even in some housebuilding. With the aid of a pair of crystal spectacles, his Urim and Thummim, which Smith said he found, and with the co-operation of certain kindred spirits, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, and David Whitmer by name, whose services were the more valuable because Smith seemed expert neither in reading nor in writing, in 1830 the Book of Mormon was published, and the angel Moroni, according to the narrative, then took away the Golden Plates. This is the story the Mormons tell of the origin of their Book, and those will accept its authenticity who without challenge are willing to accept the testimony of the four witnesses supplemented in part by the testimon