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s Mayor Lyman, 2.32, 43; on Lovejoy's death, 187. Hallowell, Morris L. [b. Aug. 14, 1809; d. June 16, 1881], 2.217. Hamilton, James [1786-1857], message concerning Lib., 1.241, visits New York, 2.1. Hammond, Ann Eliza, 1.317. Hancock, —, Dr. (of Liverpool), 1.349. Hancock, John, 2.29, 189. Harris, Andrew, persecutes Miss Crandall, 1.322, has G. indicted, 391. Harris, Beulah, 1.145. Harris, I. L., 1.248. Harris, John H., 1.70. Harris, Marcia, wife of Charles, 1.318. Harris, Mary, 1.318. Harris, Sarah, pupil of P. Crandall, 1.318; dismissal called for by town, 319. Harrison, William Henry [1773-1841], proslavery, 2.414; election opposed by Lib., 81, 333, 349, Webster preferred by G., 82; nominated for President, 434; carries away Whig abolitionists, 415, 428, 436, elected, 428. Hartford (Conn.), negro pew, 1.253. Harvey, Alexander, Rev., 2.371. Harvey, Jonathan [1780-1859], 1.111. Hathaway, Joseph C., 2.309. Hawes, Albert G. [d. 1849], gag-rule, 2.1
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
taught from early childhood the sin of slavery, my sympathies were greatly aroused. Sarah Harris, a respectable young woman and a member of the church (now Mrs. Fairweather, and sister to the before-named intended husband), called often to see her friend Marcia, my family assistant. In some of her calls I ascertained that she wished to attend my school, In order to teach her own color (Lib. 3.82; Fruits of Colonizationism, p. 9). This was as early as September, 1832. Another pupil, Mary Harris, who afterwards became Mrs. Williams, was in 1881 engaged with her husband in teaching colored persons, old and young, in Greensburg, La., their home being in New Orleans, where their oldest son is teaching, with six teachers under him (Mrs. Philleo [Miss Crandall], Ms. May 5, 1881). and board at her own father's house at some little distance from the village. I allowed her to enter as one of my pupils. By this act I gave great offence. The wife of an Episcopal clergyman who lived in t
Mayor's Court. --Before the Mayor, on Saturday, the case of Adelaide, slave of Charles F. Suttle, charged with feloniously and maliciously setting fire to Lucy Exall's house was continued until to-day, as was the case of Isabella Bryan, for using insulting language to Mrs. Mary Harris. Case of B. F. Philip, for threatening to assault and beat M. J. Carter, was dismissed at the request and cost of the complainant. Ann M. Charles was punished for living in the city with Henrico papers.
Robberies. --The store room of Mr. Robert Y. Catlett, residing on the corner of Marshall and 1st streets, was broken into on Tuesday night and robbed of about three thousand dollars' worth of groceries and liquors. The fastenings to the door were forced off, and after helping themselves to everything they wanted the thieves took their departure, leaving the entrance to the basement open. About twelve o'clock Wednesday night the residence of Mrs. Mary Harris, on 18th street, near the corner of Clay, was entered and robbed of three very fine black bombazine dresses. Mrs. H. was aroused by a noise in the lower part of her house, and on going down stairs was horrified by the sight of two negro men in the dining-room. As soon as the fellows heard her footsteps they became greatly alarmed and beat a precipitate retreat, carrying off the dresses, but leaving behind three pairs of shoes and two hats, which were doubtless stolen from some one whom they had previously visited. Upo
Police arrests. --Officer Chas. A. Moore arrested yesterday afternoon two negro men, both of whom were named William, respectively owned by Samuel Fauntierey and A. F. Gooch, charged with stealing three dresses, the property of Mrs. Mary Harris. They will have a hearing before the Mayor this morning.
The defences of Richmond — great Difficulties in the way of Taring it The New York Tribune contains some stunning revelations from Richmond, furnished by a Mr Harris, an Englishman, who had served in the Crimes, and had some knowledge of engineering. He escaped from the city, and is now in New York. His account of the fortJeff Davis & Co became fully satisfied that Richmond was to be resolutely assailed, the citizen militia were called out for further instruction and practice, and Mr Harris, although an alien, was forced to enter the ranks. Instead of appearing reluctant to do his part, he evinced a readiness and even a desire to aid in the defence by storm. He names and describes some twenty or thirty forts, some of the walls of which are from 80 to 90 feet thick, and all of them quite impregnable. Mr Harris gets into the cotton question, and shows how we make our explosives: The great scarcity of saltpetre, and the difficulty of obtaining it from abroad, has exc
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --William, slave of Samuel Fauntleroy, and William, slave of A. F. Gooch, were charged with robbing Mrs. Mary Harris of two black bombazine dresses, valued at $200. Mrs. Harris testified that after retiring on Wednesday night she was waked up by a noise in the first story of her residence, her chamber being in the upper or second story. She very cautiously got out of her bed and went to the head of the stairs, and looking over the railing espied a man stooping doMrs. Harris testified that after retiring on Wednesday night she was waked up by a noise in the first story of her residence, her chamber being in the upper or second story. She very cautiously got out of her bed and went to the head of the stairs, and looking over the railing espied a man stooping down taking things from her wardrobe, which was sitting in the passage. As she did so the fellow raised up, and holding to his face a lighted torch, she was enabled to see that he was a negro. This so much alarmed her that she screamed out, when he immediately ran out, taking with him the dresses alluded to above. After he had gone search was made about the house, when there was found at the back door, which had been broken open, three pairs of shoes and a hat, and in the yard by the fence an
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1864., [Electronic resource], List of casualties in Wickham's cavalry brigade. (search)
ott, Jos Davis, L C Pridmore, Thos Sparrow, T H Aylor, W Snith, T Clatterbuck, J A Banbecker, W S Robertson, J L Henderson. J C Cooke, Corpis P H Leadbatter and C R Wingfield, privates W J Binford, M A Waldrop, R W Luous, R A Hart, H Helm. Va cav. Missing: John Quigley, G W Fleming, D F Waldrop, J M Ficklin, 4th Va. c. June 12th--Near Trevillian's Depot — Killed: Privates Darby, 2d Va cav. W C Moseley, Lt B J Hill, 3d Va cav; W B Abraham, 4th Va cav. Wounded, Pvtes King, Lipscomb, Sergt Harris, Pvtes Kelley, J J Conner, Capt Whitehead, Pvtes Watts and Bayton, 2d Va cav; Pvtes Dabney, P F Jones, R T Armintead, W L Rogers, J H Ware, Sergt W B Foster, W M Folkes, J S Hardaway; Thos Fowier, C S Clarke, W L Gathrie, W M Hill, Corp'l Young, Pvtes Harrison, White, Jolley, Nat Thackston, S T Wootton, 3d Va cav; privates W Busic, B T Wayland, and Corp'l J T Amos, 4th Va cav. Missing: John F Hill. June 21st--Near White House.--Killed Privates A W Parr and B F Settle, 4th Va Wounded
ontinued: Ben, slave of John H Gentry, slave of James A Scott, charged will stealing an indefinite amount of money from some perform unknown; William, slave of Samuel and William, slave of A F Gooch, charged with breaking into the house of Mrs. Mary Harris, in the night time, and stealing two bombazine dresses, valued at $300, the property of Mrs Harris; and Rose, slave of Holman Duval, arrested for stealing a lot of boots and shoes, valued at $500, the property of Charles Ullinan. BurwelMrs Harris; and Rose, slave of Holman Duval, arrested for stealing a lot of boots and shoes, valued at $500, the property of Charles Ullinan. Burwell, slave of Richard Adams, charged with stealing a lot of cigars, tobacco, pipes, sugar, brushes, and candy, from some person unknown; Betsey Green, free negro, in the city with Henrico papers, charged with harboring a slave in her house; Robert Cole, a free negro, with improper papers, charged with stealing twenty packages of ground coffee, the property of the Confederate States; Virginia A Rik, a free negro, charged with permitting James, a slave, to remain in her house without permission from
counter. It turned out to be Mr. Euker himself, who was closing up the store, and after he suffered himself to be locked in there was no way for him to escape. When Euker opened the store yesterday morning Slattery was crouched up under the counter. On account of the absence of the Mayor, who had previously had the cases under consideration, the following were continued: William, slave of Samuel Fauntleroy, and William, slave of A F Gooch, charged with breaking into the house of Mrs Mary Harris, and stealing therefrom two bombazine dresses, valued at $200; Jordan Miller, charged with having in his possession a bay mare, valued at $500, the property of Edwin J Duval, knowing her to have been stolen, and with stealing a horse, valued at $400, from some person unknown; and Rose, slave of Holeman Duval, charged with stealing a lot of boots and shoes, valued at $500, from Charles Callman. William, slave of Spotts & Harvey, arrested without a proper pass, and having a pair of g
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