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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
tism of fire. During subsequent attacks by land and water, it was battered by the heaviest Union artillery. Its walls were completely crushed, but the tons of iron projectiles imbedded in its ruins added strength to the inaccessible mass that surrounded it and made it impregnable. It was never taken, but the operations of General Sherman, after his march to the sea, compelled its evacuation, and the Stars and Stripes were again raised over it, April 14th, 1865. Under an order from Secretary Stanton, the same flag that was lowered, April 14th, 1861, was raised again over Sumter, by Major (then General) Anderson, on April 14th, 1865, the day President Lincoln was shot. Of Major Anderson's former officers, Generals Abner Doubleday and Norman J. Hall and Chaplain Matthias Harris were present. The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher delivered an oration, and other prominent antislavery men attended the ceremony.-editors. View of Cumming's Point. From a sketch made after the bombardment.
picture films, this series of photographs preserves the progression of the celebration on April 14, 1865—the fourth anniversary of the evacuation of Sumter. The evening before, the news of Lee's surrender had reached Charleston and made the occasion one of national thanksgiving. The city was gay with flags; patriotic bands filled the air with music, and Dahlgren's fleet opened the day with the full national salute of twenty-one guns from every ship in the harbor. In Fort Sumter the Reverend Matthias Harris, who had helped to raise the flag over the fort, four years before, opened the services with prayer. Dr. Richard S. Storrs read that ever-beautiful passage beginning: When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. Raising the national flag in Sumter just four years after its evacuation (1). Raising the national flag in Sumter just four years after its evacuation (2). Raising the national flag in Sumter just four years after its evacuatio