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; on Lovejoy's death, 187. Hallowell, Morris L. [b. Aug. 14, 1809; d. June 16, 1881], 2.217. Hamilton, James [1786-1857], message concerning Lib., 1.241, visits New York, 2.1. Hammond, Ann Eliza, 1.317. Hancock, —, Dr. (of Liverpool), 1.349. Hancock, John, 2.29, 189. Harris, Andrew, persecutes Miss Crandall, 1.322, has G. indicted, 391. Harris, Beulah, 1.145. Harris, I. L., 1.248. Harris, John H., 1.70. Harris, Marcia, wife of Charles, 1.318. Harris, Mary, 1.318. Harris, Sarah, pupil of P. Crandall, 1.318; dismissal called for by town, 319. Harrison, William Henry [1773-1841], proslavery, 2.414; election opposed by Lib., 81, 333, 349, Webster preferred by G., 82; nominated for President, 434; carries away Whig abolitionists, 415, 428, 436, elected, 428. Hartford (Conn.), negro pew, 1.253. Harvey, Alexander, Rev., 2.371. Harvey, Jonathan [1780-1859], 1.111. Hathaway, Joseph C., 2.309. Hawes, Albert G. [d. 1849], gag-rule, 2.127. Hawes, Joel, Re
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
tion Society were faithfully exposed, and the question of Immediate Emancipation of the millions of slaves in the United States boldly advocated. Having been taught from early childhood the sin of slavery, my sympathies were greatly aroused. Sarah Harris, a respectable young woman and a member of the church (now Mrs. Fairweather, and sister to the before-named intended husband), called often to see her friend Marcia, my family assistant. In some of her calls I ascertained that she wished to arichly deserves the patronage and confidence of the people of color; and we doubt not they will give her both. Already, however, the town of Canterbury had been thrown into an uproar by the news not only that Miss Crandall would not dismiss Sarah Harris, but would practically dismiss her white pupils instead, and make Canterbury the seat of the higher education of niggers. The good people of Canterbury, writes Arnold Ms. to W. L. G. Buffum from Providence, on March 4, I learn, have had th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
ge Benson, under whose roof, on the 27th of October, occurred an incident thus reported in the next issue of the Liberator: Acknowledgment.—Just before midnight, on Sabbath Lib. 3.175. evening last, in Brooklyn, Connecticut, the Deputy Sheriff of Windham County, in behalf of those zealous patrons of colored schools, those plain, independent republicans, those highminded patriots, those practical Christians, Andrew T. Judson, Rufus Adams, Solomon Paine, Capt. Richard Fenner, Doctor Harris, presented me with five indictments for a panegyric upon their virtuous and magnanimous actions, in relation to Miss Crandall's nigger school in Canterbury, inserted in the Liberator of March 16, 1833. I shall readily comply with their polite and urgent invitation to appear at the Windham County Court on the second Tuesday of December, to show cause why, &c., &c. As they have generously given me precept upon precept, I shall give them in return line upon line—here (in the Liberator) a l
"No!" said he inquiringly, "Oh! you wouldn't do that — I'm a poor fellow — only a fisherman, sir." "But you are the very fellows we are after," was the reply. The poor devil looked ready to sink through the deck, but managed to get into his boat again, and pulled off after his dunnage. He was allowed to take everything he wanted — small boats, lines, &c., and then his craft was scuttled. The skipper and his three men were put into their small boats and towed down to the Sarah Harris and turned adrift. We saw him on board, and steamed away. The appearance of several mirages of remarkable beauty and distinctiveness have afforded us some pleasure. The fog clouds that hang low upon the water, play fantastic tricks with the sails beneath, or in them. Sometimes a fac of a vessel is seen reversed upon a cloud, apparently high in the air; sometimes it appears cut in half, one part towering, like a marble column, an hundred feet in the air. Sometimes, again, they lo<
"No!" said he inquiringly, "Oh! you wouldn't do that — I'm a poor fellow — only a fisherman, sir." "But you are the very fellows we are after," was the reply. The poor devil looked ready to sink through the deck, but managed to get into his boat again, and pulled off after his dunnage. He was allowed to take everything he wanted — small boats, lines, &c., and then his craft was scuttled. The skipper and his three men were put into their small boats and towed down to the Sarah Harris and turned adrift. We saw him on board, and steamed away. The appearance of several mirages of remarkable beauty and distinctiveness have afforded us some pleasure. The fog clouds that hang low upon the water, play fantastic tricks with the sails beneath, or in them. Sometimes a fac of a vessel is seen reversed upon a cloud, apparently high in the air; sometimes it appears cut in half, one part towering, like a marble column, an hundred feet in the air. Sometimes, again, they lo<